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What did you think of the 8 steps to zero your rifle?

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Zero your Rifle in 8 easy steps:

A zero is the alignment of the sights with the bore of the rifle so the bullet will impact on the target at the desired point of aim. When the aim, the sights, and the bore coincide on the same point, it is called the zero. There are two zero ranges, near and actual. These are the two locations that the bullet crosses the line of sight.


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Step 1: Note your Zero Distance: 50 Meters
Firing ranges should have known distances marked by stakes, signs or lines on the ground. Be sure to note whether it is yards or meters. While the difference between yards and meters is relatively small, knowing it may save you some ammunition.

If you are using a range that is not marked, you'll have to pace, measure or laser range find the distance yourself.
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Step 2: Fire 3 Round Group.
We are looking for a good tight shot group. Adjustments are made from an estimated center of the shot group.

With groups 1 & 2 we can easily determine the center of the group and make adjustments

Group 3 is a problem. You can adjust from this group, but unless the shooter tightens up, you could be zeroing for a while.

Some people like to fire a four or five round group in order to get a better approximation of where the center of the group is. That is a good technique but the target may become confusing very quickly if you don't mark your rounds well.
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Step 3: Measure for Vertical Correction
Find the center of your shot
group and measure the vertical
distance to the horizontal
center line: For example 5 1/8 inches
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Step 4: Measure for Horizontal Correction
Find the center of your shot
group and measure the horizontal
distance to the vertical
center line: For example 3 1/4 inches
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MOA Defined:
A minute of angle (MOA) is an angular measurement equal to 1/60 of 1 degree of arc. Its size increases uniformly over the range, but its value stays the same. At 100 meters the true value of an MOA equals 1.14 inches this can be rounded down to just one inch; one MOA at 200 meters equals 2.29 inches but can be rounded down to 2 inches; and at 300 yards, three inches; and so on.
Thus a sight adjustment error of 2 inches at 100 yards becomes a 10 inch error at 500 yards and a 20 inch error at 1000 yards.

Step 5: Look up your inch or centimeter value for
your MOA/CLICK at your zero distance


MOA/Click25 Meters50 Meters100 Meters200 Meters
InchesCMInchesCMInchesCMInchesCM
1 Click.29.73.571.451.142.912.295.82





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Step 6: Adjust elevation settings

Number of clicks of elevation = Measure of Vertical Correction Needed ÷ Inch or CM for your MOA/Click at your zero distance

Example: 5.125 ÷ .57 = 8.99 round to 9 clicks up.
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Step 7: Adjust windage settings

Number of clicks of windage = Measure of Horizontal Correction Needed ÷ Inch or CM for your MOA/Click at your zero distance

Example: 3.25 ÷ .57 = 5.70 round up to 6 clicks to the left.


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Step 8: Repeat steps 3-7 until your shot group coincides with your point of aim
Depending on your consistency you should be able to zero in 9 rounds.
3 shots to establish a reference point for adjustments.
3 shots to check the adjustment.
3 shots to confirm your zero.
 

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That is one way indeed a very long winded way of doing it.
No kidding.
I guess if you have a gun that can't decide whether it wants to be a shotgun or a rifle you'll be firing a lot of shots until by pure probability 3 POIs will wind up within 4 inches of each other and you'll call that your "group" and walk away quite pleased with yourself.
Any scoped rifle in my stable has already decided it wants to be a rifle and has proven that it has the right to belong in my gun safes at the range.
The definition of "rifle" for me is a gun that will print 3-shot groups of 1.5" or less at 100 yards consistently.
If it can do it consistently it stays if it can't it's on the used gun rack the next day.
If you see a scoped rifle in my safe you know it prints consistent 3-shot, 1.5"@100 yards groups or it wouldn't be there.
Starting with rifles that are accurate simplifies the sighting in process which I do in the fall again before hunting season starts.
It usually takes from 3 to 6 shots to once again confirm the zero for each gun.
 

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That is one way indeed a very long winded way of doing it.
Hilarious! I want what he's drinking! Let's not confuse anyone by talking meters and yards in basically the same breath...

All joking aside if it's a scoped rifle you can do it in 3 shots. 1st one to pinpoint the hole and adjust to it. 2nd on to confirm it's now dead on.
3rd because why only shoot 2 bullets? Don't expect the las 2 to go thru the same hole as you will be dealing with the loads cone of fire.

If it's an aperture/globe sight it might take 4 shots to confirm your dead on.

Getting into all the MOA stuff is great if you plan to extend your range out a bit like 300,400,500,600,700,800,900,1000 yds or so.
You will be looking for the come ups for your particular rifle. It's kinda nice to know for your particular rifle with 1/4 MOA scope
its 6 clicks from 100--> 200 yds. or 1.5 inches up. Or from 100-->300 yds is 20 clicks or 5 inches.
Where you notice real differences is when you have a 1/8 MOA scope because you truly have a little finer adjustment at distance.

In layman's terms and for expediency in the field you can figure MOA as such:
at 100 yds - 1 MOA = 1 inch
at 200 yds - 1 MOA = 2 inches
at 300 yds -1 MOA = 3 inches and so on so....
at 1000 yds - 1 MOA = 10 inches

so take a 1/4 MOA scope. at 1000 yds 1 click = 2.5 inches of bullet movement. 2 clicks = 5 inches of bullet movement.
on a !/8 MOA scope it's cut in half. So for instance at the same distance 2 clicks = 2.5 inches of bullet movement.

Even with a .22lr it's kinda nice to know the drop from 50 to 100 yds is approx 7 inches. The only thing I shoot at 25 yds is my pistols
and I generally shoot them at 50 yds too. But I normal shoot my 6-guns at silhouettes for fun at those distance.

There's lots more but sighting in a rifle with a scope is 2-3 shots max. Lemme know if you wish to know how.
 

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As Lowpower said, it takes 3 shots to zero scoped gun, the op is interesting to read, but I would rather be hunting.
 

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Remember - you asked for feedback...

While the overall idea is fine, there are far too many inaccuracies and inconsistencies for this to be useful, as well as being far too complicated a description of a very simple procedure.

Intro... When the aim, the sights, and the bore coincide on the same point, it is called the zero. Well... no, it's not. Zero is when the line of sight intersects the trajectory of the projectile. Since the sights are usually above the bore of the gun this intersection occurs twice, once as the bullet rises (near) and the other as it falls (far).

Are there supposed to be graphics in steps 2, 3 and 4? If so, where are they?

As others have pointed out, why are you mixing meters, inches, yards?

Back to the original question... What did you think of the 8 steps to zero your rifle?
I learned something new - No, sorry
Too much info for me - No, there is too much info that is incorrect and/or unnecessary for this to be useful
I've got a better method and I posted it as a reply - Many, many folks have done this in the past, and in this thread
I prefer to use Kentucky Windage instead - Really, the only other choice is to not adjust the sights?

How's this for a poll choice... Good attempt at a first draft, needs a lot of work.

I will commend you for taking the chance and the time to post an explanation of your method of adjusting the sights of a firearm. Work on your writing and your precise use of language. The first thing, however, is to be very familiar with what you are attempting to explain. You can only describe clearly what you know thoroughly.
 

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I start my zeroing at 50 yards, if a scope is very far off, it may miss the 100 yard target completely. I also use a target with a 1 inch grid on it. you can check how far you are off with a spotting scope. move the adjustments one at a time, it is very frustrating to turn it the wrong way and fire again. if you remember how much you moved the adjustment, that will give you a good idea of how much and how far to adjust again. when zero is correct at 50, then go to 100 and do the fine zero.
in the army, we set battlesight zero, the point the bullet crosses the line of sight first. find that and the second crossing using a good balistics table for your round.
 

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Absolutely, a two shoot method can work to achieve a benched zero. Off hand shooters (hunters), should confirm for an off hand zero, due to the fact that how a rifle is held off hand can change the point of impact, here more than two rounds may be needed.
 

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I work with an operator who sights in with one shot at 100 meters. (scope) He gets it within a 1/2" and maybe makes a second adjustment. I wish I was that good. But seriously, for the rest of us, from a rest you should get it done in 5 shots. AC
 

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Disclaimer. grab a cupa java and read on if you're bored....or just go shooting!

What ya'll call swany's way is the way most of us learned to sight in a scope. To be more precise with what I originally said...

If you have a bolt action set your rifle on a bench and remove the bolt. Yu can do this at 50 or 100 yds. look down the bore to the targetat 50 yds it will cover the whole target and backing paper. Now look thru the scope. The cross hairs should also be on the target.
Double check the bore is on target. Now load that one bullet and align on a small bullseye and shoot.
Realign your sights on the bullseye and make sure you have locked on the bull and the gun won't move. Now adjust the sights until
they're dead center on the bullet hole.
Realign the rifle back to dead center of the bullseye and shoot again. Bullseye.

Now...shoot a third round because it's so much fun to shoot that darned accurate rifle. :D That's how I learned 40 years ago.

I've always shaken my head that this kind of knowledge hasn't been passed down from father to son or friend to friend although I have to admit I have a friend who is a Master shot at mid-range and his knowledge is vast. Imho his only problem is that he never, ever volunteers information but will always answer any question, in depth, that one specifically is asked of him. If no one asks him questions all of that wonderful knowledge will die with him and be lost. Then again he complains about hunters and shooters being a dying breed. DOH!

Let's move on to lever guns. You obviously cannot look down the bore but you can have someone stand behind you at the bench and look down the barrel of the rifle while someone does the same. They can also look down the side of the barrel to look at elevation but there is an easier way.I t's pretty rare that we don't shoot into backstops anymore. If you're sighting in your scope sick a spot on the berm. Anything that stands out. A clump of dirt, whatever. If you happen to have a buddy with you he can sight in on the same clump. Make sure he identifies you're both looking at the same clump. The reason to use a buddy is if you happen blink at your shot and miss the strike on the ground he will see it and tell you where the bullet hit in relation to the clump. Now let's get back to that MOA stuff.

At our local area ranges the berms are normally around 112-115 yds. while the targets are at 100 yds. So let's have a look at the bullet strike. Both you and your bud see the bullet strikes 6 inches left and 1 ft high.
We already know 1 MOA at 100 yds - 1 inch.
You also know your scope is a 1/4 MOA per click so 6X4 = 24 clicks right will give you a rough center in windage
1 ft = 12 inch = 12X4= 48 clicks of down will give you a rough center in elevation.

OR...you if you can see thru your scope what you're pretty sure the bullet hit you can still put your scope crosshairs on the clump and
adjust to what you think is the bullet hole.

Rather method will cost you one extra shot.
The 1st is in the dirt with a rough adjustment as you only want to put a bullet on paper so you can adjust to the hole.
The 2nd is aimed on paper at the bullseye.
The 3rd is again aim at the bullseyes and adjust the crosshairs to the bullet hole and re-aim at the bullseye.

3 bullets...with a scoped lever gun....I'd shoot the 4th for fun!

On a side note if you'd like to find out what your rifles actual cone of fire is here's any easy way.
After you get all sighted in and want to do a little shooting then stick up a new target and shoot a 5 shot group.
Measure what you got and keep the target. Remove the staples gently and hang on to that target.
You can measure that group that you shot onto the target. If you want to check different ammo put up a new
target. Keep that target.

The next time you go shoot take that original target with you and put it up under your new target. Shoot your 5
shot group and measure what you got on your new target but again carefully remove your original target.
Re-use it and you will begin to get a cone of fire that your rifle normal shoots under different wind/temp/hum/alt conditions.
Just because you go out on a good day and shoot a 1/2 in group on one day doesn't necessarily means you will do it on day 2.
You may find out over time you rifle actually averages a 3 inch cone for fire. It will be apparent.

All little bit of knowledge goes a long way and as most of us have heard don't expect your bullet to hit the same point from a
cold bore shot as it will after firing a shot or two. Instead why not determine where the bullet will hit on that cold bore shot?
I clean my rifles every single time i get done shooting. Including my .22's as I target shoot...a lot.
Just make it a habit that you carefully note where that first bullet will go on that first shot overtime you go to the range.
And, note the temp when you fired. After 5 or 10 visits to the range you will begin to see that the first shot hits 1.5 inches high at 80 degrees.If you hunt with high temp swings makes sure you know what the first shot will do with that same box of bullets will do at 30 degrees. Knowing these things instill confidence that you can make a clean, humane kill on the first shot.

The real problem as I see it is there is so much info out there and we can get very long winded trying explain one concept and why that concept does what it does. Like why does a cold bore shot bullet not go where the rest will. Because oil in the barrel creates a bit of additional pressure that increases the speed of the speed, somewhat? Can you check it? How about dragging out that crony and noting every cold bore shots speed. Is it thesame speed as the 2nd, 3rd, etc?

Then ask yourself...does it really matter all that much? I've seen guys show up at the range their WOW hunting gun and shoot up an 8 inch paper plate then turn to me and say "ok, I'm all ready for hunting season". They see my 40X .308 and ask how it's shooting and I tell him to look at the one hole group at 100 yds. They usually pack up at that point and no one will see them again until next year, a week before deer season.

While my ammo is not factory I've spent a lot of time helping friends sight in and break in their fine new rifles and I've seen many news ones that can shoot 3/4 MOA at 100 yds. with factory ammo. WOW!

Lastly, and I get long winded due to being an old part...I normally shoot a min of 5 shot groups as like the one of fire target it tells me more about my shooting than does a 3 shoot group. With my hypo and target rifles much over 5 shots and it stats eating out the center of the bull. I do shoot 3 shot groups with my big bores while sighting in because 550 gr lead freight trains make me spend more time pouring lead than shooting matches.

Now make up and go shooting if it's warm enough! :D
 

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Yes I have, and it was a bent barrel on a model 60 that was in a closet with a bunch of stuff piled on top of it. I was 18 and I got it shooting straight for the old uncle to use.
 

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I use to work for the Planning Dept. of a municipality. Almost every large project required redesigns and therefore I had access to volumes of large paper (24"X36" & 30"X42"). Being a cheap Yankee I hauled roles of this stuff to my car rather than the recycle bin and have never bought targets. This stuff is invaluable for sighting in: one guy showed up at the range with a new holosight on his pistol and couldn't hit an 8 1/2"X11" target at 25', I rolled out one of big sheets and we caught the bullet in the upper left-hand corner of the paper - at 25'. When you go to sight in a gun, whichever method you choose, start close and bring big paper.
 

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In the past I've always started at 25 yards with an "unknown or new" rifle and go/adjust for the bull at that yardage. Next I go to 100 yards and fine tune it so to say. I usually find it pretty close to the 2-3" high range at 100 for hunting doing that, with an eye on the published ballistics for the given round where I want to eventually leave it at 100.
 

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There's nothing I like better than sitting at the bench and having a guy shooting next to me at 100 yds, wondering why he can't hit the target out there. Then to find out the gun, scope and lead sled is all new and he is trying to "zero" his gun for hunting season! I usually ask them sorts if they've got it on paper first over at the 25 yd targets, the answer is no, i tell them that's where they need to start and then proceed to the 50 yd and try again, after adjustments, finally move to 100 and have some fun and make the final adjustments. If they feel froggy sometimes they'll try 200 Yds but not very often.
 
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