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Handle guns long enough, and sooner or later you'll do something without thinking it through, and it hurts. Hopefully it won't be too bad, just enough to teach you a lesson, remind you of the forces you're dealing with. Sometimes it's something stupid, like shooting something hard and flat with a BB gun, and having the BB come back at you. I know of a guy that did something similar with a 45 auto, and it damn near killed him.

In my case, I've had ONE oops, many years ago, not long after I started shooting, and it made me more careful. A little blood shed, in this case, was a good thing. It's kept me on my toes for the ensuing three decades!

Super Bowl Sunday, a dreary February day in the early 80's, and the two teams playing that year were nobody we cared about, so we went shooting for the entire weekend at a friend's cabin deep in the boonies. I had brought a couple thousand rounds of various calibers, but most of it was full-power pistol ammo to feed my then-new S&W 686. There was a steady drizzle so we were shooting off the front porch, and I was having trouble hitting a distant target. Without thinking about the spatial relationships involved, I grasped a 4X4 upright with my left hand, rested my shooting hand on my forearm, and let one fly. My knuckles were about three inches from the front of the cylinder, and about a hundred sand-size particles of 2400 embedded themselves in the back of my hand, mostly around my knuckles. It felt like someone had swatted me with a flaming 2X4. My shooting companion didn't laugh out loud, but he couldn't believe I did anything that stupid, and I spent the rest of the day nursing bloody knuckles.

So..........what have you folks done to make your own gun bite you?
 

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I've been lucky, only got nipped by an auto 12 gauge once trying to clear a jam. I did see a video of a guy shooting a .50 something rifle at a steel plate.
It ricocheted back, hit the ground about halfway between him and target, then whacked his earmuffs, knocked him off the seat. I think the steel plate was a little too securely fastened, perhaps. The sounds were pretty interesting, especially the bullet coming back.
 

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As a kid, I saw my cousin shoot a .22 short he had stuck in a clay bank and shot with a Daisy pump BB gun; the MT case came back and cut him over his eye! ha.
My two best "bites" were trying to use a .380 Walther PPK in these big hands and choked up too high on the grip. I got "plowed" two long furrows in the web by the slide. Sold it!
My next was my bloodiest. I was doing a close drill with a Ruger SP 101 and Corbon 125HP's, the range used these big angle irons you taped your target between. At about 12ft I dead center the edge of one, and got 'splash back". I had a big piece of jacket/core hit inbedded in my right cheek, forehead, and my left forearm, plus tiny shrapnel. I was able to dig out the pieces in my forehead/arm with my knife, but the "cheek piece" (get it?) was too deep, I swelled right up around it. I went to an emergency clinic, and the recep freaked, said she had to call the Police since it was a "shooting". I tried to explain, and luckily for me the EM Dr. was a shooter, he got it! ha. He said the pc in my cheek was so close to the nerve that I was fortunate I didn't dig around too much w/knife, I coulda had a paralyzed corner of my mouth...not too good for a preacher! ha.
I won't go into how bloody an unmodified Colt Series '70 made me in my first defensive handgun course! ha.
 

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I had a HiPower hammer pinch me in the web of my hand, can't remember which configuration or if it was one I had or a friends.
 

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The worst was one time had a female german shepard come in season.Had a stray dog trying to dig under the fence to her.Id ran him off a couple of times.Well he came back one morning,my other dogs were raising cain.I grabed a short barreled single shot 12ga.Walked out and shot it up in the air,one handed like a pistol. Id forgotten it was loaded with 3' #2s. The hammer tore a chunk out of the web of my hand.That dog better be glad he never showed back up ;D Then there was the time a Browning 50 left me with a nice scar.But that storys even longer ;D
Gunrunner,,
 

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Like others, I have felt some powder burn from the cylinder gap, and the bite of a long spurred hammer combined with a short beavertail from a Model of 1911 on the web of my right hand. My Pop, on the other hand, felt the bite from the sharp corners of the slide on a High Standard Sport-King after wrapping his left thumb around his right hand.

The worst bite I have ever seen somebody get was an eye-opener. A group of us were shooting where we normally did, near a gulley that some locals used for a refuse heap. We arrived, taped some targets to a chunk of sheetrock laying in the pile, and the first guy to let fly was shooting a .41 Magnum. He nailed the target, as he usually did, but something about the shot sounded different, and immediately another guy on the right side of our informal firing line dropped into a fetal position. He wasn't bleeding, but he took his time getting up. After helping him to his feet, he dropped his drawers, and in the center of his right thigh was a blue/black/purple welt about as big as a softball. No broken bones, no broken skin, just that huge, ugly welt and broken blood vessels. We went and inspected behind the sheetrock and found that somebody had dumped an engine block, covered it with some other rubbish and the chunk of sheetrock. The bullet had struck the engine block just below the juncture of the side wall and the head.

Just goes to show... gotta know where the bullets are going to go. The guy that took the richochet was told to "Walk it off" by the rest of us. Later, we had a t-shirt made for him that said, "I was shot by JR..." which happens to be the initials of the guy with the .41 Magnum (and "Dallas" was still in vogue on TV). ;) That is the only lasting momento he has to commemorate the event, other than the religious inspecting of any backstops.
 

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After getting back from shooting one day, I'd just got done cleaning a KBI Feg coppy of a Walther PP in .380, and was loading it up for carry.

With my brother and girlfriend in the living room, I had my right side towards them, gun pointed at the wall to my left. After chambering the round, I started to s-l-o-w-l-y depress the decock/hammer block safety with my left hand, so much slowly that it dropped the hammer before the block was fully in position and BLAM!

Ears ringing, look into the LR to see my brother, hands about six inches from each ear, mouthing the words "Are you okay?" Upon inspecting, the sharp corner of the slide had blasted back into my hand's webbing, puncturing the skin and a nice trail of blood was running from my hand down to my elbow.

As my hearing started to return over the ringing, my girlfriend said "Where's the dog?", who had been standing underfoot when the round went off. A search commenced, and she had decided that noise was unacceptable in the house, bolted under the waterbed and wedged herself between the under bed drawers.

The bullet had gone the opposite direction of the LR, hit the interior cinderblock wall of the rental, pancaked (it was FMJ) after about 1/3" penetration, then fell to the floor.

Now when working with a "hammer-drop safety", I hold the hammer.

The best "bite" I've ever witnessed was during class while getting NRA Rifle Instructor. The Training Counselor had everyone demonstrate a rifle they were NOT familiar with, so a nice lady got to demonstrate lever-actions with a Yellowboy 1866 replica.

With the rifle pointed in a safe direction and positioned roughly at port arms, she swung the lever down saying "To load the chamber, just swing the lever down like this. A round will exit the magazine onto the elevator. The shooter must then briskly close..." and as she briskly shut the lever, she pinched the last 2" of her right lady appendage between the lever and the trigger, her mouth shot open as far as it could go while simultaneously shoving the rifle away from her.

That wasn't working as it was secured FAST to her body, causing her eyes to open as wide as her mouth, at which point she opened the action and started speaking another language, entirely different from the one she had been teaching with.

Once everybody recovered (mostly), the TC said "This is what you call a 'teachable moment'. Now would be a good time to remind everyone to keep ALL body parts clear of moving parts on a firearm!"

Jon
 

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I did a 'stupid' like Preacher told about his cousin. I was dropping .22 shorts on the ground and shooting them with a Daisy Cub bb gun. I shot several; then, I felt something hit my forehead. Just a little sting like maybe a grain of sand. I started to drop another cartridge, but George (friend with me) looked at me wide-eyed and ran away. I felt something running down my forehead, thought it was sweat; wiped it with the back of my hand, and my hand was covered in blood. It was just a cut from the open end of the casing. If I look really close at my forehead, I can still see a little T-shaped red scar. I got my left thumb too high while bracing my right hand and got two grooves (just nicks) from the slide on a .380. I did a 'stupid' of resting a .22 revolver on my left hand. For several years I had several tiny black spots just under the skin. That's all I can think of at the moment; but I'm sure there are other stupid mistakes I've made. These were the worst and luckily I was not badly hurt. We can try to be SO careful, but still goof-up sometimes.
 

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Ok, now y'all don't get mad but...



I've never done any of that stuff to hurt myself because I'm not a masochist. ;D ;D :p

I got a bit of SKS thumb at the range one time. Was loading a cartridge and I hit the little bolt stop and let the bolt fly forward, but luckily I have iron thumbs and it didn't hurt me too bad. ::)

I'm sure some of you 1911 shooters know how this is with the steel magazines, the little lips on the bottom. I've sliced my hand on those, and pinched my hands slapping a mag into my 1911. It hurts!!
 

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Cascade Jinx said:
This guy had his gun bite him good! So much for fast draw. This probably happened a lot in the Old West, but I've never seen it played out in a movie. ;D

Warning - A bit of profanity on this video, sorry folks

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=paxk_LPmdMI

CJ
Here is the original video here:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zYvAxLX6OzE

This is the same guy who made the 336 disassembly video that was posted here, and I made a video showing the proper way to do it and he got all mad and took his video down.
 

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I don't think that a larger frame 45 auto sitting on a hip (rear hip) is a great set up for fast draw shooting! ::) :eek: ::)

The old western low slung rigs with a single action had more than one purpose.

I think a lot (a hell of a lot) of dry fire parctice would preceed a live ammo run. And with his set up I would never attempt a fast draw! I could see this leading to an even more tragic event or greater injury than he suffered. :mad:

CJ
 

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Shooting my 45 at an indoor range when one of the ejected case hit the wall and bounced back landing between my glasses and lower eyelid :-[ ouch
 

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186 Tmanbuckhunter said:
This is the same guy who made the 336 disassembly video that was posted here, and I made a video showing the proper way to do it and he got all mad and took his video down.
I remember that Travis. Same guy, eh? Doesn't surprise me one bit. ::)

Speaking of masochists...this guy seems hell-bent on exposing his stupidity to all who'll watch.

This removes any question (except the correct spelling ???), here is the epitome of a dufas.

Roe
 

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Barenjager said:
I remember that Travis. Same guy, eh? Doesn't surprise me one bit. ::)

Speaking of masochists...this guy seems hell-bent on exposing his stupidity to all who'll watch.

This removes any question (except the correct spelling ???), here is the epitome of a dufas.

Roe
He actually gets money off his videos from google ad sense. All he did was upload the video to make money because he knew it would be popular, and like, each view he gets so many cents off of. He's also giving responsible firearms owners a bad name with that video. I've flagged it but youtube hasn't taken it down, so.
 

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Cascade Jinx said:
I don't think that a larger frame 45 auto sitting on a hip (rear hip) is a great set up for fast draw shooting! ::) :eek: ::)
...And with his set up I would never attempt a fast draw!
I must disagree with you there CJ. Neither the type of firearm nor the position of the holster is the issue here.

There are defined steps to a proper, safe, and rapid, draw and presentation. Key among, them keeping your finger out of the trigger guard and the safety on until the gun is pointed downrange. Removing the safety, thumb cocking the gun ::), or placing your finger on the trigger before the weapon is indexed on the threat or target (and the finger should only move to the trigger when a shot is imminent) is a recipe for disaster.

I certianly agree that dry fire practice is important and can ingrain these movements, making them second nature and eliminating occurances like this. Training is critical.

Roe
 

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While duck shooting in a below ground level metal blind, I leaned back for an overhead
shot at a mallard with my head resting against the metal rim of the blind. It just about
knocked me out. I never did that again!
 

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A few years back, while up in Spearfish shooting a "Steel Challenge" Match, there was a fellow that was on the adjacent range dedicated to the Cowboy shooters. He was banging away on the little steel "Bad Guys" with some degree of rapidity... This went on for an hour or so, and in between some of the sets, a couple of us would mosey on over to watch him. To his credit, he was pretty quick, fairly accurate, and transitioned well from handgun to carbine, even with those pooch cowboy loads he was shooting... He noticed some of us watching, and made sure we all saw him switch from his regular rig to fast draw rig; I reckon he was getting ready to do some showing-off.

He made a half-dozen dry runs with his quick-draw, then commenced to load up. I went back to watching other competitors on the steel challenge side. About the time I turned around to see how fast his draw really was, he drew, fired, re-holstered, then repeated. He got quicker and quicker. He loaded up a second cylinder full and started in again. He made two quick draws, firing, re-holstering like before. On his third draw, it seemed faster than the others, but I did not hear the clang of the little steel "Bad Guy" this time. What I did see was the 'Dude' hobbling around the back of his Blazer, shutting the back window, then he continued hobbling around to the drivers side. He left pretty quickly - - I reckon he was bound for the hospital. Few minutes later we sauntered on over to where he was, and sure enough - - a blood trail. ::)

Barenjager said:
There are defined steps to a proper, safe, and rapid, draw and presentation. Key among, them keeping your finger out of the trigger guard and the safety on until the gun is pointed downrange. Removing the safety, thumb cocking the gun ::), or placing your finger on the trigger before the weapon is indexed on the threat or target (and the finger should only move to the trigger when a shot is imminent) is a recipe for disaster.
Words to live by, or least, bleed a little less from... ;D
 
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