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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I know this can be a controversial subject so lets please just reply with what you did and what your groups are like. I've not owned a marlin or rem barrel for that matter and am just curious if anyone has done a shoot, clean shoot clean etc barrel break in process with their newX7..

I should be getting mine late this week and plan to be shooting by Sunday so any suggestions and experiences are welcome.


PS,, I have never done a break in process before but as mentioned, this is my first rodeo with this gun manufacturer
Thanks
Brett
 

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Well, I first clean all the oil and gunk out before I take a first shot. Then I fire three shots, clean again. Fire three more, clean again and do it one more time to make sure it's shooting exactly where I want it. That's about all you need. It will take forever to clean the first couple times but gets quicker the more you shoot it.
Taking one shot and cleaning after every shot is of no benefit, at least that's my opinion. My groups are about 3/4 of an inch at 100 yds with the cheap Winchester 130 gr super X power points (.270). Not sure about my 7/08 since I havent shot it since I changed it's stock and scope.
 

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I clean thoroughly when new and then after each range session, normally 15-20 rds. My 243 and 25-06 shoot multiple loads under an inch and at least one varmint load under an inch at 200yds.
After I get the load work done I'll let it go 40-50rds before cleaning.
 

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El Kabong
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I bought a Shilen stainless steel varmint barrel 7 years ago.
Cleaned it after the first shooting
Ive cleaned it after every shooting since.
It still prints sub MOA at 200 yards.
Its had over 700 round shot though it.
 

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I clean out the barrel before I even fire the first round in a new gun. I then clean it out again after I've shot my range session which can be anywhere from 25 to 50 shots. I've found that this works for me. I've never found that cleaning after every 3 or 5 shots has affected my groups or accuracy.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks for the input guys. I'll give the gun a good first cleaning before firing a shot.

Typically I will clean after my accuracy starts to diminish which is between 30-70 rounds in my other rifles.

Just need to get the gun delivered so I can get started playing with it!

Thanks
Brett
 

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When breaking in a barrel what we want is for the almost microscopic machining ridges left to be all smoothed out. When a copper bullet is sent through the barrel those ridges will get embedded with copper. Its good to get that copper out so that the next bullet can smooth it out a little better. This process will make the barrel where it does not load with copper and makes cleaning much easier.

Here's my way of doing this.

Clean after each shot for 5 rounds
Then shoot 5 and clean. Do this 5 times.

Cleaning needs to get at the copper thats been deposited in the barrel. So use a good copper removing cleaner. The best I know of is Wipe Out
 

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1) cleaned the factory crap out when new
2) next cleaned every other shot or two for the first box of 20
3) then clean after every box for the remaining first 100 shots
4) now clean every time after I'm done at the range.
 

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raygunter said:
When breaking in a barrel what we want is for the almost microscopic machining ridges left to be all smoothed out. When a copper bullet is sent through the barrel those ridges will get embedded with copper. Its good to get that copper out so that the next bullet can smooth it out a little better. This process will make the barrel where it does not load with copper and makes cleaning much easier.

Here's my way of doing this.

Clean after each shot for 5 rounds
Then shoot 5 and clean. Do this 5 times.

Cleaning needs to get at the copper thats been deposited in the barrel. So use a good copper removing cleaner. The best I know of is Wipe Out
^^^^This is pretty much what I do too except I use JB Bore Paste and shooters choice copper remover.

I doubt that barrel break in makes a noticable difference in terms of accuracy but it does seem to pay off in ease of cleaning and how many shots you can fire before your groups start to open up and you need to clean. Also barrel break in pays off more with factory barrels then with premium barrels.
 

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Howa has this to say and I do it just to be on the safe side. I use an OTIS cleaning system and not a rod.

Howa Break-In Procedure

BREAK-IN PROCEDURE FOR GUN BARRELS USING JACKETED BULLETS

For the first ten shots we recommend using jacketed bullets with a nitro powder load (Most Factory Ammo). Clean the oil out of the barrel before each shot using a simple window cleaner (like Windex®) which will soak the oil out of the pores. After firing each cartridge, use a good copper cleaner (one with ammonia) to remove the copper fouling from the barrel. We do not recommend anything with an abrasive in it since you are trying to seal the barrel, not keep it agitated.

After cleaning with bore cleaner, clean again with window cleaner after each shot. Use window cleaner because many bore cleaners use a petroleum base which you want to remove before firing the next shot. This will keep the carbon from building up in the barrel (oil left in the pores, when burned, turns to carbon).

To keep the temperature cool in the barrel, wait at least 5 minutes between break-in shots. The barrel must remain cool during the break-in procedure. If the barrel is allowed to heat up during the break-in, it will destroy the steel’s ability to develop a home registration point, or memory. It will have a tendency to make the barrel “walk” when it heats up in the future. We have all seen barrels that, as they heat up, start to shoot high and then “walk” to the right. This was caused by improperly breaking in the barrel (generally by sitting at a bench rest and shooting 20 rounds in 5 minutes or so). If you take a little time in the beginning and do it right, you will be much more pleased with the barrel in the future.

Look into the end of the barrel after firing a shot, and you will see a light copper-colored wash in the barrel. Remove this before firing the next shot. Somewhere during the procedure, around shot 6 or 7, it will be obvious that the copper color is no longer appearing in the barrel. Continue the window cleaner and bore cleaner applications through shot 10.

Following the initial ten shots, you then may shoot 2 rounds, cleaning between each pair of shots, for the next 10 shots. This is simply insuring that the burnishing process has been completed. In theory, you are closing the pores of the barrel metal that have been opened and exposed through the cutting and hand lapping procedures.
 
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