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I am a huge fan of the Marlin leverguns, but totally dispize the Marlin triggers, in both the pre and post Rem buy out. Between the heavy pull and the flop, I amazed that there are so few options out there to correct decades of manufacturing complacency. I can almost live with the flop, but the extremely heavy pull is totally unacceptableam at any level.

I'm a big fan of a 3 to 4 pound trigger pull and in recent past years I replaced all my Marlin triggers with the WWG triggers. it is absolutely amazing how reducing that factory pull can make anyone a far better offhand shooter. I have witnessed my young son make great off hand shots with his Marlin that he never could have made with the heavy factory pull.

Getting back on track... Since buying my first WWG triggers about 6 years ago, I have seen the cost nearly double. I purchased my first WWG trigger for my 1895XLR in 2010 for $69. As recently as a couple years ago, I liked the result so much, I converted the rest of my 1894 and 336 rifles. At that time the cost ranged from $79 to $89. Just this past week, I looked to purchase a couple more of these triggers for two recently purchased 336 rifles that my oldest daughter and her other half will be using this coming hunting season. Was I surprised, they now run at Brownells and Midway for $119 each. I guess I should have bought WWG stock.

At this point, I have not made the purchase. Nearly $120 or a small replacement piece, 25% of the cost for the entire gun. I found it so insulting, that I now find myself looking at other options.

Remington has made allowances for providing tigger adjustment on their bolt actions. I had hoped that Remongton might have looked harder at the triggers on the Marlins, but as of yet no changes or MFG aftermarket products by them to correct an age old issue.

I'm aware of having the currently installed sear and trigger polished, but that does not correct the flop issue. If I have the trigger assembly polished, is there another solution out there for the flop?

This thread might seem like an age old rant, thus my apologies....
 

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I am a huge fan of the Marlin leverguns, but totally dispize the Marlin triggers, in both the pre and post Rem buy out. Between the heavy pull and the flop, I amazed that there are so few options out there to correct decades of manufacturing complacency. I can almost live with the flop, but the extremely heavy pull is totally unacceptableam at any level.

I'm aware of having the currently installed sear and trigger polished, but that does not correct the flop issue. If I have the trigger assembly polished, is there another solution out there for the flop?

This thread might seem like an age old rant, thus my apologies....
Read posts by Tomray here. Marlin designed their triggers to make them work well, as well as to be safe and reliable. They never "fixed" them because they weren't broke, and there was little or no demand to fix anything. Historically, "the flop issue" was not an "issue."

Henry rifles have much better triggers than Remlins do, and their triggers are also noticeably better than JM Marlin triggers. Henry designed their rifles from a clean sheet of paper. They could have done pretty much anything. What did they do, though? They borrowed heavily from Marlin. And, you know what? Their triggers have "flop" too.

As for the price of the Happy Trigger, if you buy a new Remlin and put a Happy trigger in it, you've got the price of a new Henry. If Remington made better Marlins, they could charge what Henry gets.

My two cents: if you want a Marlin, but don't like the trigger, plunk down the money for a Happy Trigger. The guys at the range where I shoot have a saying, "Life is too short to own a gun with a terrible trigger." They're right.
 

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I tried a WWG trigger years ago when they first came out and didn't think it was worth the cost of admission. I sold it to another MO and have been perfect happy with my factory triggers since. Aftermarket companies usually sell stuff to fix what isn't broken.
 

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I like a good lever gun but Remington manufactured triggers are generally horrible. I bought a 338 MXLR (Remlin) that had a trigger so bad, I directly attribute it to a clean miss on a deer which aren't to plentiful in my parts anyway. It was like an 8 pound, 3 stage trigger. Like letting the clutch out from a dead stop on a VW in third gear. Of course that wasn't even the worst problem with that gun. Add on the almost regular jamming and misfires and you get the picture. About a week ago, I handled a SBL. It actually had an acceptable trigger. Not great or even good but acceptable to the point that it didn't "need" to go to a gunsmith. That rifle was one dollar shy of one thousand dollars. Considering it was a Remlin, I figured the price was a bargain because the mere appearance of it not being another factory return made it a collectors item.

I put Happy Triggers on my Marlins now. When you consider the actual cost of replacing the typical piece of crap Remlin trigger, you have to include a gunsmiths price, the time your without your gun, the cost of fuel for the two trips to the gunsmith, the value of your time screwing with taking a gun that should be right, right out of the box and dicking around with it and then finally deciding it's a piece of crap and ferrying it to a gunsmith and of course, the aggravation. Do not buy a current Marlin anything without considering the probability of what it will cost your to get it to the point that you don't hate it. Personally, I wouldn't even think about buying a Remlin unless I had an extra $100 in wasted ammo and a month or so to send it back to the factory just so they could fix what any euro trash gun maker could do in their sleep. Simply calculate the cost of a Happy Trigger into the price of the gun before purchasing. Don't even think for a minute your one of the lucky ones that got a trigger that makes you miss everything. If your got a good one, take that money and donate it to your church because only divine intervention can make a company that hates good triggers, good.

Remlins are like buying a compact British car. They look cute but don't be surprised if your neighbors kids have to pull their dependable car over and help you push it. If a $120 Happy Trigger makes your Remlin 100%, then your lucky. It's a bargain and you should feel like you dodged a bullet.
 

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I took the trigger out of my '81 336, cleaned up the rough spots and carefully reassembled it. The pull is now around 4 1/2 lbs; just right for my aperture sight equipped rifle. Not much creep or overtravel...just a good, medium effort trigger.
 

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W
Read posts by Tomray here. Marlin designed their triggers to make them work well, as well as to be safe and reliable. They never "fixed" them because they weren't broke, and there was little or no demand to fix anything. Historically, "the flop issue" was not an "issue."

Henry rifles have much better triggers than Remlins do, and their triggers are also noticeably better than JM Marlin triggers. Henry designed their rifles from a clean sheet of paper. They could have done pretty much anything. What did they do, though? They borrowed heavily from Marlin. And, you know what? Their triggers have "flop" too.

As for the price of the Happy Trigger, if you buy a new Remlin and put a Happy trigger in it, you've got the price of a new Henry. If Remington made better Marlins, they could charge what Henry gets.

My two cents: if you want a Marlin, but don't like the trigger, plunk down the money for a Happy Trigger. The guys at the range where I shoot have a saying, "Life is too short to own a gun with a terrible trigger." They're right.
I agree with much of what you stated... but I also note numerous others seem to agree on addressing the infamous trigger issues. I spend a fair bit of time on the gun range, not as much as some, but more than most. Your range guys are right, "Life is too short... for terrible triggers."

Out of the two 336 rifles I recently purchased, one was a newer Remlin 336SS for my oldest daughter on her 21st birthday. For the better part of the past year, she has a steady young man whom accomplished more in 1 year then I was able to do in 20 years... develope an interest in guns and then in hunting. This young man uses and well used Winchester 30-30 that is a family shared gun, thus my daughters interest in wanting a 30-30 levergun. As much as a Winchester 94 is a good gun, dad (me) wanted it to be a Marlin and opted to buy my oldest daughter the same gun I bought my yougest daughter a couple years back. I then came across a great deal that was to good to pass up, on a LNIB JM 336W manufactured in 2000 for $250. As a sign of gratitude, my thought was to give the 336W rifle to my possible future son-in-law. Thus providing him with his own his own deer gun, which would give the couple somewhat common rifles and common shared ammo. Thus,that brings the story a bit up to date...

After checking these two rifles out I noted them both with comsiderable heavy trigger pulls. The newer REM manufactured 336SS had 8+ lbs of pull and the gold trigger JM 336W had nearly a 10 lb pull; possibly why I picked it up so cheap. Thus, both rifles with "terrible triggers", that are in need of addressing.

After serving 20+ years with Uncle Sam, I have spent the past 12 years since in manufacturing. As much as my time with Uncle Sam taught me to shoot well, my time in manufacturing has taught me the value of "continuous improvement". The lack of "continuous improvement" will eventually kill any manufacturer.

Just within this thread, there have been several pointed out suggestions. Suggestions (aka Ideas) are the initial basis for improvements. We do not always need to reinvent the wheel, but even the smallest of changes can win you the race. My point... in all the decades the 336, 1894 and 1895 Marlins have been manufactured, why not a better trigger pull straight from the factory. Most shooters are not asking for a factory set 3lb pull on thier hunting rifles, but a guaranteed 5lb to 6lb trigger pull out of the box is not asking for too much, nor should it prove to be unsafe.

Your statement made about "punk down and spend the $$$ for the Happy Trigger" is probably the way I'll end up going, seeing that I will not be the primary user of these rifles. In the end, I strongly feel we are making up for a lack of "continuous improvement" in the manufacturing process.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
I'll add on one more thought to this tread...

As much as I love my Marlin leverguns... In my eyes, as many of you can attest to, Henry does make a very good quality side eject rifle... If Henry rifles had a loading gate like Marlins or Winchester rifles, instead of a loading tube, and if Henery had been sooner in providing a few more options with pistol grip stocks and with stainless steel options... Then add in all the manufacturing issues Remington has struggled with in recent years... The Marlin levergun line could have gone exstict after the 2008 buy out... Fortunately for us Marlin Owners, that never came to pass...

A bit off the main topic, but it does highlight the idea for timely "continuous improvement" in the manufacturing process... For both the newer Remington made Marlin line and thier competitors...
 

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The trigger in a average JM Marlin is the production trigger,adequate,if you want it better,you have to accurize it,no way can mass produced triggers be Everytime perfect,however if you learn to tune it you don'have to pay someelse the 100 bucks.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
I appreciate all the replies to this thread... My initial point was meant to bring attention to bad triggers on the Marlin Leverguns.. Really does not take much to make them better as many of you have found.. But why buy a gun worth hundreds of dollars then pour more money and time into it... When it could be better out of the box for a fraction of that cost... All that is needed is some "trigger quality control"... Measure the trigger pull before packaging.... Then make the nessasary improvements.. Eventually changes will be made in the factory that will limit the rework... Not asking for target triggers with too light of a pull for the average shooter/Hunter... But a trigger in the "safe" 5 to 6 pound range is definately not asking for too much!
 

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I just polish my own trigger parts. Easy peasy....and a crisp 3 pound trigger is not hard to do.
I do the same and mine cleaned up to between a 5-6 pound pull across the rifles. They're crisp and break smoothly. Now if I could shoot them with the eyes I had when I was young and flexible...
 
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I've never noticed a problem with any of my Marlin triggers. I don't have many Marlins, but they were made in 1950, 52, 57, 60-61, 65, 80, 86, & 2002. My 2007 model 1895 has a Happy Trigger on it, and it is noticeably better than my factory Marlin triggers. But my factory Marlin triggers aren't bad enough to spend the time or money to make them better.

Maybe I spent too many years (20) in the Army Infantry, shooting military grade rifles, pistols, shotguns and machine guns with lousy triggers, as well as finely tuned match grade and sniper grade triggers, it makes me appreciate a Marlin trigger for what it is. :tee:
 
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Ranger Point Precision also makes a replacement trigger, at the same price point.
 
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