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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Ok i don,t know if this topic has ever been here before but iam going to throw it out here. I hunt here in PA.mostly in the past i have used the 270 and 30/06 for whitetails and black bear which both cals are more than adequate. My question is would you fellas that hunt western part of the country that are hunting elk or muledeer feel under gunned with these 2 cals while hunting in the brown bear territory? just wondering in case of some day when i can afford to do an elk hunt :D which one to bring. thanks again DCH. :)
 

· El Kabong
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Im darn sure I can kill anything that walks in north America with any one of my 30-06s.
I prefer the challenge of the 45-70 and 45cal muzzleloader.
I live on the left coast, and have traveled deep woods all over the place & never have felt under gunned
 

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The .270 & .30-06 are commonly used "out west" for mule deer, elk & bear, or pretty much anything else too.

I'd feel very confident, particularly with the .30-06, as bear medicine. Load it with good 180 gr Nosler Partitions or some other excellent "controlled expansion" bullet, learn to shoot it well, and take anything in North America.

BTW, the threat of grizzly attack in some areas of the west is real. Offhand I'd say the area around Yellowstone, in Montana and Wyoming, is an area where that is a distinct possibility.

*I did feel a little uneasy in '09, hunting in Wyoming for mule deer. We'd hunted out in the sagebrush flats lower down, with poor results. We just weren't seeing many deer. So, we drove, then hiked well back into a deep canyon, up in the mountains near Yellowstone. Pulled two mulies out of that canyon, but also saw grizz tracks on our trail. Mama and cub tracks. I was carrying my .25-06 and my pard had the "big" gun, a .270 Win. Once the deer were down, we wasted no time, boning them out then hiking out to the trailhead with them on our backs. Think a guy with a .25 cal rifle and a venison filled pack doesn't get a little nervous hiking through grizz country, walking right on grizzly tracks? ;D

That .25-06 is just lightning wicked on mule deer, even at longer ranges out in the sagebrush country, but it didn't feel real well suited for dealing with a hungry grizzly bear.

BTW - noted Alaskan brown bear guide Phil Shoemaker has made it clear that he considers the .30-06 with good bullets to be very effective big bear medicine. Phil's word on that sort of thing is good enough for me.

http://www.grizzlyskinsofalaska.com/What_to_Bring.html

Guy
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
thanks M700 for the the read on grizzly skins of Alaska it was interesting. And i to would be a bit nervous packing that venison out totting a 25/06 on the grizz trail ;D. so if by chance i make it out on a elk hunt i will leave the whitetail/ pronghorn muledeer gun home. ; ;D.thanks again DCH.
 

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When I lived in Alaska, would I have felt under-gunned with an 06? Probably not but I wouldn't have felt well-gunned either. Now see, me, I never gave it much thought. I've been crawling around the outdoors for a bunch of years and never concerned myself too awful much with nasty animal encounters. Always chased off any black bear I encountered and cats stayed pretty much to themselves.

Even in AK I never worried much about bear. Moose were a bigger concern but even then they nearly always could be dissuaded. So I carried a Glock .45ACP mainly for the two-legged critters that concerned me much more.

That all changed one sunny day on the Little Susitina River when I had an all too close encounter with a big brown sow. Fortunately, after much posturing, she decided she had sufficiently impressed upon me her dominance and did not feel the need to prove it. I have been kicked, punched, shot at, and had missiles the size of city buses hurled at me but nothing rattled my cage like that bear.

There is a big difference between hunting a bear and defending yourself from one. We've discussed that here a lot of times and there are some very good threads to be found about it.

If I were going into densely populated grizzly country I would not feel great about a 270 and an 06 would make me feel only marginally better. I don't know that it would keep me out of the area, but I sure would feel better with my 1895G and Garret's best.

Maybe the fact that I have never shot a bear takes away from my credibility but I know that for me, and my experience, there is no such thing as too much gun when it comes to big bear defense. You'll be lucky to get off one good shot.
 

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As much as I love the .270 and like the 06 I would be using my 300 mag loaded with 200 grain nosler partitions if I were hunting where bear larger than black bear reside.
 

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I've lived here in Montana all my life, and I've killed plenty of deer and pile of elk with my 30-06 loaded with 180 grain bullets. It's plenty of gun for the task and will handle the big bears too, no doubt about it. Yes I carry a 45-70 for bear defense when we vacation in areas with a very dense grizzly population. When I hunt big game in areas where there are known to be big bears I use my 30-06 and I've no doubt it will kill big bears just as easily as it kills big bulls.

MM
 

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dch - I ranged that buck at just over 200 yards, something like 204 as I recall. Keith dropped it with a single 140 grainer from his .270 - as he usually does. That guy is a hunting machine. Looking forward to my next trip with him!

Guy
 

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Thanks, but Keith and I cheat, we both practice regularly out to 600 yards at the local gun club, and occasionally shoot beyond that. He did make a fine shot, and I got one a day or two later at an honest 400 yards with the .25-06, on a cross-canyon shot.

I love those high-mountain mule deer hunts. Sure hope to avoid any grizzly problem next time we hunt there...

Guy
 

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Either of those rifles would do you well out here in the West. If your hunting the coastal area's where brown bears are and up and personal I would use a heavier bullet in either rifle that has a high BC, and the same if your around here in the Rocky Mountains with Grizzly. Shoot what you are the most comfortable with and shoot the best.

Joe
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
thank you every one for your thoughts on this topic. If i get the chance to do a elk hunt i think the 06 with a good 220 gr head would foot the bill from information you fellas that hunt the western part of the states hard. And i don;t feel under gunned now thanks again.DAVE
 

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dch said:
thank you every one for your thoughts on this topic. If i get the chance to do a elk hunt i think the 06 with a good 220 gr head would foot the bill from information you fellas that hunt the western part of the states hard. And i don;t feel under gunned now thanks again.DAVE
Personally I would go with 180's for elk, but if in the Tetons and Yellowstone areas I would go bigger. Chances are if your hunting in these areas you will be with a guide and in that case I would go 180"s and let the guides worry about bears.
 

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I spent the last 5 years hunting Montana (both western mountains and eastern breaks/river bottoms) with a Remington 700 .270 and 130 grain bullets and never once felt under gunned. While it wouldn't be my first choice in bear defense, It killed elk, mule deer and whitetails like lightning and either of the two proven calibers you mention have much to recommend them in the West.

I'll be returning to Montana for school in the Fall and the .270 will continue to be my caliber of choice for all hunting adventures there.
 

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Pard said:
The challenge is distance. My shot range for the 30-06 is 1/2 mile. The 45-70 200 yards on a good day.
I don't see the problem. Put a sling on both rifles, and carry one on your back while you "handle" the other - I'd be keeping the .45-70 in my hands, with the '06 or .270 on my back. If a bear comes in too close, you have the medicine in your hands. If a shot comes up for a deer/elk/caribou/etc., put down the .45-70 and "limber up" the long-range medicine. I see no conflict here.
 
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