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So for Christmas this year a good family friend has given me a beautiful piece of black walnut... has anyone on here made their own stock? I just received a marlin 336 from wally world from my fiance. I was totally floored because no one has ever bought me anything like that before. I have been rubbing the stock down with some teak oil all day and it looks a hell of alot better but that (birch) I think it is with the fake coloring lines are brutal. The gun itself is straight and the wood is fit really tight contrary to what I've read around the web about remlins. It actions fairly smooth for a new unbroken in rifle and has a fairly crisp albeit heavy trigger. But it feels like a awesome working gun, its tighter than any m16 or m4 I was ever issued! LOL. :). I've seen a company called boyds who make walnut furniture for 336's with an option of a straight stock vs the pistol grip Boyds: MARLIN® 336 STRAIGHT GRIP STOCK WALNUT (FINISHED) ( I can do the finishing on it in my workshop) and figure maybe save the pretty wood and maybe on down the line pick up a 336 in .35. Anyway I've never made a gunstock before and would for sure use some cheaper wood from a fallen hardwood tree in my backyard for a test bed before using this! christmaswood (1 of 1)-2.jpg christmaswood (1 of 1).jpg
 

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Hey Carl,

That is a beautiful piece of walnut.

What? No pics of the Marlin?

Think your fiancee is a keeper!

Merry Christmas,

Mark
 

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My grand father made several custom stocks with hand tools, careful rasping and sanding, hand fitted and finished and many nights spent hand rubbing with oil... and I must say they rivaled any custom stock I've ever seen. The quality of fit and finish were superb. He read a book on making custom rifle stocks before he attempted it and I sure wish I could recall the book title.

That piece of black walnut would yield a stunning stock set for a 336. Depending how thick it is you might get two sets out of it.

Good luck to you.

Jack
 
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One beautiful piece of walnut! :congrats:
 
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That certainly is a stunning piece of walnut! Congrats on the 336 and your future wife, she sounds like a gem. Great plan for getting the 35 Rem down the road, you will like it.. Welcome to Marlin Owners, be sure to let us know what you do with the wood on your 30-30, Boyd's puts out a nice product. DP
 
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I would look at getting it roughed in with power tools, then rasp, sand it finished. One thing about hand finishing it, you get to determine the length of pull etc... while the stock is still rough. When you finish it be patient. Sand down to 1200 grit or so. It closes up the pores and removes all sanding marks. You get it really close really quick with 80 up to 240 grit, and a rasp. Then start working up in grit numbers from 240 for finishing work. 400 grit, go to 800, then 1200. That thing will be baby butt smooth and show a shine like it deserves. I would personally use a palm sander too. And me personally, true oil is what would go on that piece for a finish. DROP DEAD gorgeous. I can see it already. A real beaut piece of wood deserves this kind of effort. You will be glad you did it after words.

One good thing to, your fiance will not mind buying you more guns once she sees how pretty that will be.:biggrin: Seriously, congrats on the new gun, a real nice piece of wood, and a best friend for life. God Bless
 

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That is certainly a uniquely grained and good looking piece of walnut; but in my opinion, that is not a piece of wood from which you would ever craft a buttstock and expect it to be durable. The key to having a strong butt stock from figured wood is having straight grain in what would the wrist area of the stock layout; which, assuming you've shown pics of the entire blank, are non-existant in this piece. Although this blank would certainly produce a couple of forend woods; given the time and expense necesary to craft a fine stock, you'd be far better served to find a more suitable blank Butt Stock Left Side..jpg For example, look at the stock on this Marlin; this blank has highly figured grain in the butt area, but the grain structure running thru the wrist area is straight. Highly figured stocks are beautiful; but to be serviceable and withstand recoil, they must have straight grain in the wrist to be strong in that critcal t area. As I said, these are my opinions and you are certainly free to do as you wish; but in the end you may be very disappointed should you choose to use that blank. Best of luck; Tom
 

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Carl, welcome to the MO Family, from here in west cnetral Mo. First two suggestions, 1) Keep the Lady! 20Keep the friend. A lady that will but you a Marlin is definitely a Keeper and that chunk of Black Walnut is flat out awesome. I live about 40 miles north of the Lincoln/Warsaw, Missouri area, this is the gunstock capital of the world. Lots of gunstocks came out of Rhinehardt Fajen and E.C. Bishop's gunstock shops. That piece of walnut has some awesome figure and in a gunstock would command a high price. making your own stock can be done, will take lots of time, patience, Sharp tools and reading gunsmithing books on stockmaking. Check your local libraries for starters. A great book to start with is, ''Gunsmithing,'' by Roy Dunlop, has lots of info on stock design, measureing/fitting and how to do the actual shaping and inletting. Please keep us in the loop and take/post lots of pictures. Take care, John.
 

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That's an absolutely gorgeous slab of walnut. If you make a stock from it, we definitely want pictures of it! My 30-30 has a birch stock, and I'm planning on replacing it with a nice walnut stock, also. Of course, mine won't be built by my hands, since I don't have the tools nor the expertise for that. But I can do a lot of hand rubbing on it. Man, that walnut is inspiring!!

Ron
 

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I made a stock out of mesquite wood for a client once. What I did was take it to Lawson's custom guns in Tucson and had them rough cut it. They make some of the nicest stocks out there. It was right at $100 to have them rough cut it.
Then I did the fitting and finishing. It was very tedious work. One mistake and you can screw up a nice piece of wood.
Next time I will let Lawson's do it all.

Also the wood must be cured properly first. Lawson's let their wood cure for 3 years before they use it for stocks.
 

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Carl, welcome to the MO Family, from here in west cnetral Mo. First two suggestions, 1) Keep the Lady! 20Keep the friend. A lady that will but you a Marlin is definitely a Keeper and that chunk of Black Walnut is flat out awesome. I live about 40 miles north of the Lincoln/Warsaw, Missouri area, this is the gunstock capital of the world. Lots of gunstocks came out of Rhinehardt Fajen and E.C. Bishop's gunstock shops. That piece of walnut has some awesome figure and in a gunstock would command a high price. making your own stock can be done, will take lots of time, patience, Sharp tools and reading gunsmithing books on stockmaking. Check your local libraries for starters. A great book to start with is, ''Gunsmithing,'' by Roy Dunlop, has lots of info on stock design, measureing/fitting and how to do the actual shaping and inletting. Please keep us in the loop and take/post lots of pictures. Take care, John.
I owned property with a lot of black walnut on it about 30 miles south of Warsaw. I wanted a gun stock for a Mauser I was redoing. I stopped in Rhinehardt Fajen to offer them a whole tree for a stock to which they replied "we don't get walnut that-a-way" They buy precut blanks with dimensions just larger than the stock they are going to make.

Personally I don't have to skill, tools or patience to make a gun stock.
 

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That's a pretty piece of wood but I think squirrelbrain is right. If you want to learn about stock making check out a guy named Chris Knerr on youtube. He goes through tools you'll need, layout, etc.
If anyone is looking for a nice piece of wood at a reasonable price check this out Index. I got 2 beautiful pieces of black walnut a couple of weeks ago from them.
All they have left is 2 piece blanks, perfect for levers and shotguns.
 

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remember, too, that if yer gonna take a pistol-gripped marlin and make a straight-gripped one out of it, you'll need to find a different lever. not a big problem, i'd hope, but it's there. keep the lady!
and mind yer topknot!
windy
 

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As one who has built a few muzzleloaders I can agree with Squirrel Brain in that you need strength in the wrist area. More importantly working with that type of highly figured wood takes a certain amount of experience. Unless one is extremely gifted, they need a couple of stocks under their belt before using that type of wood.

DEP
 

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As one who has built a few muzzleloaders I can agree with Squirrel Brain in that you need strength in the wrist area. More importantly working with that type of highly figured wood takes a certain amount of experience. Unless one is extremely gifted, they need a couple of stocks under their belt before using that type of wood.

DEP
I have done a fair amount of wood working, but when I tried carving a highly figured piece of walnut, it was very challenging.
 

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With that dark striping, it looks more like European walnut than American (black) walnut.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Pics!

So here it is, The teak oil I've been rubbing in really helped darken the wood up a bit and made it look less cheap. I was wondering about the finish though? I've never seen a finish on metal like that unless it was that "cerakote?" type thing will it chip or rub off?




marlin (1 of 1).jpg marlin (1 of 1)-2.jpg marlin (1 of 1)-3.jpg marlin (1 of 1)-4.jpg
 

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Discussion Starter #20
I am so scared of messing it up LOL. I dont have the tools to rough cut it. That sounds like a good idea though!!! I kinda want to go the way you described!
 
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