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I'm admittedly not too knowledgeable on wood.I have used Tru-oil with good results before on the more modern rifles.Tru oil doesnt give me the reddish-brown hue that I would like for old guns.Any suggestions??
 

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Get an oil based Cherry Wood stain---test on sample pieces first to the effect you want. I use it on new walnut furniture pieces, and especially repairs, to give it that red hue aged look of older aged walnut.



Steve
 

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I only use Boiled Linseed oil .. the more you apply the darker you can make it.
 
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Gunjunkie said:
I only use Boiled Linseed oil .. the more you apply the darker you can make it.
On my RRB stock I started with a mixture of raw linseed and turpintine about 50/50

This mixture sealed the grain of the wood.

When I couldnt get the wood to absorb anymore I switched to proper boiled linseed ( not chemically boiled). Using a small amount on my hand each time I rubbed this into the wood twice a day. Allowing the coating to almost dry.

Altogether it took me 3 months of oiling to get a lovely deep reddish colour to the woodwork.

Every now and then I apply a little boiled linseed to the stock, again by hand. The shine seems to go deep into the grain of the wood.

Chris
 

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Then you could always give it several coats of hand rubbed thinned varnish.
 

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Min-Wax Sedona Red #222 mixed in equal parts with Mineral Spirits and Boiled Linseed Oil. I usually mix up a teaspoon of each ingredient, dip a piece of 400 grit wet/dry paper and sand a "finish ready", bare piece of wood using the finishing mixture, coupled with the sanded particles to fill the pores. Allow to stand for 20 minutes or so, then wipe it down with a clean, dry cloth. Do this until the desired color is uniform, repeating the process as necessary.

Follow up with a clear sealer/filler to seal the oil/dust mixture into the pores, buff down with 600 grit or 0000 steel wool, and repeat.

Follow this step with Tru-Oil if desired to get the luster you like, or leave it as a straight hand rubbed oil finish. Typically, I will use at least three coats of hand-rubbed Tru-Oil to better seal the wood following the staining and sealer/filler. Leaves a nice satin luster that has a fuzz more protection than a straight oil finish.
 

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I've used Fiebings brown leather dye. Variety of shades. Thins with alcohol. Soaks in deep, sands well to even tone, and covers well with Tru oil finish. You can also wet sand dyed wood to fill the pores.
 
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