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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi All........... Navy Arms and LSI both offer a '92 repro.
LSI's "Puma" is a Brazilian import, but what about the Navy Arms '92...is it made in Brazil, Italy...?
And if it's Brazilian, is it the exact same rifle as the LSI Puma, or does the Navy Arms have a little more hand-finishing & better workmanship?
Their website doesn't seem to provide the info on where they're made.

Thanks in advance for any info you guys could give.
 

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Ringo
The Navy Arms 92 is made by Taurus/Rossi/Puma. Navy Arms is the importer. They order their rifles with a better fit & finish than the regular production lines put out. I think they are an excellent value and very smooth in operation. I found mine at a gun show in Fort Worth for $400 tax included so their "list price" is real optimistic.
The one I had was a stainless short rifle in .45LC. It shot the Cor-Bon 300gr to point of aim at 50yards. When I got my 1894 Marlin Cowboy in .45LC my #1 son just HAD to have the Navy so it went to him(actually he wanted it the first day I got it). The one drawback that I found was with the heavier loads is that you NOTICE that the butplate is stainless steel & not rubber!
jim.e
 

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my wife both me the navy arms last xmas in 44-40.I love it accurate I now that she paid $315.00 otd at our local gun shop having a special sale.
the fit and finish on them are much better than the puma's(I had one).I read some where that navy arms has the stocks done in american walnut and has there own spec's on finishing on metal parts.blue/casehardening.
all in all I think they are a great buy for the money.
pete
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Guys........I can't thank you enough. Your info is mucho appreciated.
~ I thought Navy Arms had their rifles done with a better fit & finish, just couldn't be sure.
I know that the LSI Puma needs to be "slicked-up" quite a bit with some polishing before it'll work smooth.
Sounds like maybe a Navy Arms '92 might be in my semi-near future.

Thanks again, guys.
 

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puma

Ringo,

In order to slick up a Puma, you will need three hands, a prehensile tail and a very tolerant assistant! :shock: Well, maybe it's not THAT bad, but a Marlin is so DANG much easier to work on! A friend bought a used 357 Puma recently, and like a dummy, I volunteered to slick it up for him. I had never taken a 92 apart before, and boy did I learn a trick!

I did a google search on Rossi Puma and found some tips from Marauder13 that were invaluable - especially the one about reassembling the bolt with a spent round on the bolt face to keep the ejector in place.

The site recommends two parts sources, and the person in Arlington is much less expensive & ships promptly. I put a dedicated spring kit from Brownells in it & I felt that was really worth the $. The inside of the carbine was pretty rough, and the slick-up was well worth the effort.

The Puma has a lot of eye appeal, but owing to the more uncomplicated design, I will stick to Marlins for myself. SW
 

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The 92 Puma may be harder to tinker with, but its a much, much stronger action than the Marlin. I'm a Marlin guy but the truth is the truth.

Buckeye
 

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I've had one of the Navy Arms 1892s in 357 for about 4 years now. It was my #1 gun until I got my Marlin in 44-40 and I still take it out and use it on occasion. With a 145gr Win Silvertip JHP, it's more accurate than I am and will stop a deer or hog in it's tracks. Provided you do your part as well.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
44-40 Willy said:
I've had one of the Navy Arms 1892s in 357 for about 4 years now.
Hi Willy........... May I ask, which model you have: Rifle (24" bbl); Short Rifle (20" bbl); Carbine (20" bbl) ?

And are the Navy Arms' more slick and better crafted than the LSI's ?
 

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24" rifle. I think the same blank is probably used on all calibers. In 357, it's a pretty hefty thick barrel.
 

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44-40 Willy said:
24" rifle. I think the same blank is probably used on all calibers. In 357, it's a pretty hefty thick barrel.

Gotta second that one. I have a short rifle, 20" barrel & its hefty to be sure. I kinda like it tho. Seems easier to shoot offhand than most of my other guns. Just plain fun to shoot too! Mines an EMF tho not a Navy Arms.


Ringo,
I think the only difference is the wood. I'v heard different tho so I mighta just got lucky because mine was pretty smooth from the box.
 

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The LSI's have a safety on the top of the bolt and the standard Brazilian wood. The Navy and EMF versions do not and have walnut stocks. Otherwise, they're pure Rossi...........Buck 8) :roll: :D
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
A safety !!!
No LSI for me then.... Looks like I'll be leanin' toward the Navy Arms in .45 Colt.

Thanks Guys. ~ :)
 

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Four-Eyed Buck said:
The LSI's have a safety on the top of the bolt and the standard Brazilian wood. The Navy and EMF versions do not and have walnut stocks. Otherwise, they're pure Rossi...........Buck 8) :roll: :D

EMF's arent walnut but somekinda Brazilian hardwood. Kind of a reddish brown finish on it, here see for yourself. I kinda like it myself.


Been tossing around the Idea of walnut but mine looks good to me & I havent come across anything specially for the Rossi's in walnut. I thought about a Win 92 stock set but I dont know if the foreend can be made to work. I know the originals had tapered oct barrels & of greater concern to me I believe they were a bit shorter. I cant seem to find my stock stretcher. :lol:
 

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I put walnut on my LSI 92 in 454, after two trips back to the manufacture for cracked fore grip I said to heck with it and put on Win 92 wood all around. My gunsmith had no problem at all installing the walnut and we used factory seconds to keep the price down. Now after several hundred rounds the fore grip has not cracked and it is a very fine looking levergun with walnut insted of the original coconut wood.
 

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Ringo:

If you are looking for a make believe Winchester Model 1892, 44/40, I would recommend one sold by Dixie Gun Works, Inc.

I purchased one in the year 2000 and have been very happy with the little gun.

It is just like the orgional Winchester to the point that parts will interchange.

It has a 24" blued barrel, color case hardened receiver, European walnut wood with a satin oil finsh.

The gun sold then for $ 575.00 and is made by Armi San Marco in Italy.

I assume they still carry the gun and if they do I highly recommend it.
Till next time, HAVE A GREAT DAY, djh
 

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I got one of the older rossi puma 92's in .357. (doesn't have that safety switch up on the reciever). I love that thing, it's really light, and while it isn't my favorite rifle, I have shot a buck with it. I just love the way it feels carrying it through the woods. It just fits perfectly in my left hand if I hold it just forward of the reciever. It has perfect balance, and I must honestly say, even with it's crude front sight, I can't shoulder and get on target faster with any other rifle I own. Good Stuff.
 

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I have a Navy Arms 1892 357 with a 24" oct. barrel. It is a great shooting gun. I really like it. Mine has walnut wood that looks pretty good. The fit around the cresent butt plate is not perfect but not bad enough to gripe about.
 

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The best production 92 available these days is the Winchester/Miroku 92 Ltd. Edition. Davidson's commissioned a run of 500 in each of several calibers. I have a particular weakness for Trapper length lever rifles and just bought one of these which I got from CDNN for $699 (about $100 below the "standard" dealer cost). I think they're selling slowly due to the high cost, but if you want the best in late model 92's , this is it:

Winchester/Miroku '92 Ltd. 16" Trapper - .45 Colt

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Not sure what your application is, but if you like Trappers, this limited edition offering from Legacy/Rossi is a really great little carbine...

Legacy/Rossi '92 Ltd. 16" Trapper - .454 Casull


chambered in .454 you can shoot everything from mousephart lead cowboy .45 Colt loads, Speer Gold Dot JHP .45 Colt defense loads, the hot Corbon .45 Colt JHP defense loads, and then right on into full bore .454 Casull loads if you wish. I bought mine with the intention of shooting mostly .45 Colt with just the occasional use of .454. The more I handle this little carbine the more I love it. Loaded with great features like bright hi-viz sights (green rear, red front), loading port on receiver and also tube feeding port ahead of the forestock-easy on the thumb!, the black finish hardwood looks like ebony against the bright stainless, stainless finish for better withstanding weather, humidity, perspiration, salt water, ventilated butt pad to nicely absorb recoil with heavy loads, extremely versatile chambering (.45 Colt -and- .454 Casull), John Browning's compact, lightweight, slick and super strong 92 action. Great little rifle that's light, compact, and a pleasure to handle.

I have these as fun guns for plinking, camp guns, truck guns, and around the property/home defense guns. I don't use either of these little carbines for cowboy action, as I have other rifles (Marlin 1894's and Browning 92) for that application.

Either one would benefit from having the action slicked up. All of today's new lever rifles can benefit from an action job. And while it's definitely not as easy to tear down/reassemble as the Marlin 94, you only have to slick it up once. And when a 92 is slicked up, it's really SLICK! I love my Marlin 1894's, but love these 92's every bit as much.
 
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