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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Anybody install the Wild west Trigger? It's supposed to lighten the pull to 2-3 lbs. Is it relatively easy to install?

Ramses II
 

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Yes it is real easy just drop in, once you take the rifle apart. I am happy with mine probably will buy another for my .35 rem.
 

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The Wild West Trigger is a good investment. They aren easy to install; if you run into trouble they have an 800 number and will talk you through the process. And the trigger pull does come out at about 2 1/2 #'s.
John
 
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I'm not the best at installing things in guns myself, so I had the wild west trigger, bear ejector and aluminum follower installed by my gunsmith in my 45-70 guide gun for $37.50. That trigger is the best thing you can do for your rifle, whatever the caliber. It's a pure gem....clean, reliable pull. Sure aids in accuracy. It went from about 7-8 lbs to 2.5 lbs...do yourself a favor and get it in as many of your Marlin rifles as you can afford. You won't regret that improvement. (it will improve the trigger to 2.5-3lbs in most guns.)
 
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I'm allright at gunsmithin' stuff. Shoot, sure couldn't do it for a livin' but I think I should be able to drop in the trigger. Now, I just need some instructions or a good exploded diagram of the 336.....anybody know where I can find one?

MMM
 

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I installed one on my 336 a couple of weeks ago. It was pretty simple and straight forward. Just pay attention to which screw goes where. Two of them look very similar but one is longer and won't fit in the wrong hole.
Also, take a good look at spring assembly before taking it off and remember to slide the keeper in and out from the left side. I don't know why thats important, but it didn't work well when I tried from the wrong side.

Also, it is well worth the $ and bother. My trigger is just great. I have been to the range 3 times since the change and I am still getting better and more confident with it. My groups have shrunk alot. In fact, this morning I was out testing some new loads with BL-C(2) and RE7.
With 31 gr of Reloader 7 and a Speer 130 FP I got 4 holes to touch. Should have quit there cause the 5th was off by 3/4 inch.
I never did that with the stock trigger.


Bob A
 

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The only problem I had with mine was it was to light for the .444Marlin, it was only 1.75 to 2.0lbs of trigger pull. For me that was to light. So I took it out and traded it for another trigger at 4.5 lbs. The other WWG triggers I have are all 3.0 to 3.5Lbs so I don't know how this one was so light.

fknipfer
 

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fknipfer

Likely the hammer notch in that gus was simply smoother than most.
The only way the WWG trigger can reduce pull is because its polished better than a Marlin factory sear.
I may get one some day but so far have been happy with the factory parts after a little smoothing, very little.
 

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fknipfer

Likely the hammer notch in that gun was simply smoother than most.
The only way the WWG trigger can reduce pull is because its polished better than a Marlin factory sear.
I may get one some day but so far have been happy with the factory parts after a little smoothing, very little.
 

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I disregarded all advice to the contrary and did a VERY little and VERY careful polishing of the sear on my 336 trigger. This, combined with weaking the trigger return spring made a big difference in my factory trigger. It's still not as good as it could be, but it's good enough that I cant justify the extra cost for a Wild West trigger.
 

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Kart,
If you aint scared try polishing the hammer notch with a bit of emry paper. Just a couple swipes cleans them up nice.
 

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Oh I'm scared! I'm very scared! :shock: You only get one chance to mess this stuff up. I considered trying to polish up the hammer notch, but I looked at it very closely for a long time and didn't notice anything I could do to improve it. It seems to have a nice sharp edge to the notch and I think all I could do would be to radius the notch edge ever so slightly. That might make it a little smoother but I don't see why it would make the pull any lighter. Based on your suggestion I may have another look at it next time I take it apart.

The thing I don't like about my trigger now is that it has some creep to it. At least I think what I am feeling is what others describe as "creep". As I slowly increase the pressure on the trigger I will feel it give and move just a tiny bit....but it stops and doesn't go "bang". Then I keep increasing the pressure and finally the trigger moves enough to release the hammer. I have some ideas on how that could be fixed by modifying the sear but that involves modifications I feel is too risky for me to try.
 

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You can stay out of trouble by using "polishin" grit paper like # 1000 or finer. Find something that is stable and "straight (like a piece of glass) wrap the grit paper arount it and polish. Be conscious of not changing any of the contact angles.
 

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What your feeling is machining marks in the hammer or sear.
You dont want to change any angles at all. I hold the hammer in a vice & use a 1/2" strip of 400 grit glued to a small piece of sheetmetal. Like I said, just a couple swipes is all I'v ever done & was suprised by the difference.
But, if your nervous better to leave it alone. :wink:
 

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I haven't looked at mine as closely as to understand (yet) what you're describing, but would a lady's (el cheapo cardboard) nail file work? I don't know as to the grit, but sounds simpler than gluing up a small home made file? Humbly...
 

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I was going to use one of them Mommicked, even went as far as to swipe one from the wife. The ones she has seem pretty course tho & looked like they might cut with the edge too & change the depth of the notch. Was easy enuff for me to make my hammer honer as I have lots of little pieces of sheetmetal.
 

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How would valve-grinding compound, or jeweler's rouge, and an old toothbrush work? Too imprecise? Just a thought...never tried it.
 

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I would think you would want something very thin to be able to get access to the inside of the notch and concentrate your effort on the particular part of the surface inside the notch that rides against the trigger sear.

When I polished my sear, I colored over the surface to be polished with a Sharpie marker. Then I gently and slowly drew the surface of the sear across a whetstone, making sure to keep the surface to be polished flat against the stone. I went ever so slowly and after every one or two short passes against the stone I would look at the surface and see how much of the ink had been honed off of the surface. By checking how much and where the ink was coming off I could tell how much and from where the metal was being removed. I reapplied the ink a couple of times and when I found the ink was being honed off of the sear evenly across the full surface I knew I had acheived a nice, smooth, flat surface

It seems jewelers rouge on a toothbrush would abrade on the total surface rather than just polishing off the high spots left from the machining process.
 
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