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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I broke down my new 410 and installed a Trigger Happy Kit. What a difference it makes! I cleaned all the goo out of the action, oiled it up and reassembled it. Needless to say, I was surprised at the roughness of the action. I read a post elsewhere in this forum from a fellow that discovered the same malady in his new Marlin. He used wheel bearing grease to smooth things up. I don't know if I want to do that, though. I would think that grease would be a bigger crud magnet than regular gun oil. Any other ideas? On a wistful note, do you think our beloved 1893s were that rough when new? Methinks not! Oh well....what can a person do, eh?
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Here is what I have done so far.....using my stones from Brownell's, I carefully worked the top of the hammer and bottom of the bolt to reduce the drag on the hammer. I had to flare the hammer slot in the back of the bolt because the hammer does not line up right. I also touched up the area where the hammer pivots. It was quite rough. Everything is much smoother in regards to the hammer. The shell carrier will need some stoning where it slides up and down in the receiver. Every little bit helps.
 

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Another trick that helps is a Cratex flexible abrasive kit. Chuck one up in your dremel. After sending 100 - 200 rounds downrange, take it apart and buff the wear spots. I'm a little soured on the newer Marlins - there's way too many burrs.

Being a cheap sort, I tried a do-it-myself trigger job instead of the WW kit. (I put a WW kit in my 444P and really like it) By carefully prying the trigger return spring up, you can gain a couple pounds of trigger pull. Go slowly. If you pry it up too much, you'll have to remove it to bend it back.

I clipped a couple turns off the hammer spring a little at a time. You will have people tell you that's a bad idea, but it has worked well for me. Then deburr the hammer & trigger as much as you can. I really don't try to change the geometry as much as just smooth things up. I go slowly, and it takes maybe an hour & a half.

Then I have a better trigger pull and the C-note can be cheerfully squandered on ca. 1900 Steyrs! :D SW
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Hi 'Hogger,
I know what you mean by all the burrs! I bought a brand new 1895SS in 1990, but I don't recall it being anywhere near as rough as this new 410. I will do some shooting and polishing, as you suggested. The weather here has been great! As soon as deer season is over, I will resume chasing the ruffed grouse. I will tote the 410 along for that! I bought a book by Layne Simpson about shotguns and acquired a good bit of new knowledge. I have been using my drilling for the grouse, but the 410 should be a challenge!
 

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I took my original 410 grouse hunting. Once. I busted Mr. Chicken at close range & he outflew all the others as they recalled they were late for an appointment. He was still flying strong last I saw of him. Took the old 410 home, cleaned it up & have not shot it since! I have used a model 28 on grouses since then with good results. SW
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Hi 'Hogger,
I abandoned my modified sighting system on my new 410. I took the lowered ramp off and installed a $4.00 HiViz fiber optic bead in the screw hole closest to the muzzle. Now, when I bring the gun up, the bright green bead sets on top of the Lyman dovetail block I replaced the rear sight with. I used my sandbags and spent quite awhile boresighting in the back yard at a small target placed at various ranges. The bead sits dead center of my targets, and the targets sit dead center in the bore. Now, I just have to see how it works. It looks more like a shotgun with the fiber optic bead and no rear sight. I really had a hard time imagining sight alignment on a ruffed grouse that just took off! I think Marlin could offer it both ways: with or without rifle-type sights.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Hi 'Hogger,
I took the 410 out to chase grouse today. The birds were nowhere to found today, but........the cottontails were abound! I shot 5 in the span of 5 minutes. Most shots were through light brush. One shot was about 25 yards! My sight arrangement works well! My game vest was full, and my left hand was full of rabbits, too. On the 2 mile hike back to the truck, the grouse were all over! Next time I won't shoot so many bunnies. I made a mess cleaning them. My wife is not pleased!
 

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That'll teach those wascal wabbits! :D Should I ever get a new 410, I will give your sight set-up a try! I would probably use it on doves. For wabbits, I'd go for head shots w/ an accurate 22. Actually, it's been a long time since I've given the wabbits what for. My preppy daughters had a couple for pets & they would give me the cold shoulder for quite a while if I plugged some. Same for ducks. They like turkey, though. I guess turks just aren't cute & cuddly. :? SW
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Hi 'Hogger,
Doves are small and fast, aren't they? Minnesota just reopened the dove season. I see one every now and then. I have to admit, I had the upper hand on the rabbits today. We had no snow on the ground, but Mother Nature changed the bunnies white already. I went down my favorite grouse trail and the rabbits were like little white ghosts! They were just sitting there. They probably thought I couldn't see them. Do you have prairie chickens (sage grouse?) in your neck o' the woods? We have a few here with a limit of 2. I have never seen one. The most unique bird I ever shot was a spruce grouse.
 

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I'm not sure what the proper name is for them. They have feathered legs and squared off tail feathers. Dad always called them chickens. Limit is 3 a day. My wife's family farms wheat & I had an offer to hunt some stubble on their place, but that would have meant hanging around with them. Well, I never did make it there. In Wyo, there are sage hens - they're a lot bigger... & dumber. I never shot one because I heard they taste pretty rank. SW
 
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