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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
i've been looking at the ballistics charts from remington, winchester, and federal. according to those charts, there is hardly any difference in velocity, energy, and trajectory between 150 and 170 grain bullets at 100 and 200 yards.

what is the general consensus/experiences regarding the performance of either bullet on deer and hogs? and what brands/types have the most consistent results in the field?

thanks alot.
 

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There is not that much difference as you said. Some of the difference has to do with penetration. the 170 will usually out pentetrate the 150. If you are hunting bear or large dear you may want the heavier bullet. That said, 150 will do the job.

The 150 grain load will shoot flatter. If you intend on taking a shot out to 200 yards you would do better with the 150 load. Particularly if you use speer or the new fusion by federal. I just got a box of the fusion and hope to give them a try. energy and fps at the far range is better because they have a better coeffcient.
Pb
 

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The 170's should out penetrate at all ranges and like you have found in your research there isn't that much difference between them. I have always used 170's as all my 30-30's past and present prefer them. Best accuracy is most important. That said if you are going to be hunting hogs anytime soon most folk lean to the 170's since the range is usually much under 200 yds and inside of 150 yds I am given to understand the 170's out penetrate the 150's. On a big porker this might be an advantage.

Jeff Quinn form Gunblast.com really likes the barnes X bullet which only comes in 150 gr for 30-30. The bullet construction apparently gives outstanding penetration at the lighter bullet weight and one day I may try them.

One of my best friends hunts pig with a .223 and in his words "shoot them between the eye and ear, works every time."

Bottom line is find out what shoots best in YOUR gun and be happy. Hitting what you shoot at is more important than the energy advantage gained with a bullet you missed with.

Of course this advice if free and worth what you paid for it. :wink:
 

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I have always gotten good accuracy out of the 150 grain bullets and they penetrate plenty good as I haven't recovered one yet, they seem to exit on a regular basis. They also expand better than the 170 grain bullets and I think they are better for deer than the 170 grain bullets.
 

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I didnt have very good acuracy out of my rifle with the 150s but the 170s shoot great. For me that was the reason I went with the 170s.
 

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I've said this in the past, and will keep saying it, lol
The 150's flat out drop deer a little faster. At ranges up tp 100 yds, on avg. deer, heart/lung shots, no question in my mind. I used 170 corelokts for many years and killed many deer with them, and can readily see the difference, , I won't go back to 170's for DEER. I'm lucky both shoot well out of my older 336.
 

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I've always defaulted to the heavier loads. They penetrate better and don't damage as much meat. It just so happens that Rem 170s were the first and only load I've shot in my 336. They shoot under an inch and are inexpensive at WallyWorld. I don't mess with what works.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
would bullets of the same weight, but from different manufacturers shoot differently? as in a 170 Rem. corelokt and an 170 Winchester power point?

the power points seem to get alot of praise, whereas the corelokt have been criticized for not expanding much.

it seems like a heavy, quick expanding bullet would be the best balance, as long as the accuracy was good.
 

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tenniso said:
i've been looking at the ballistics charts from remington, winchester, and federal. according to those charts, there is hardly any difference in velocity, energy, and trajectory between 150 and 170 grain bullets at 100 and 200 yards.

what is the general consensus/experiences regarding the performance of either bullet on deer and hogs? and what brands/types have the most consistent results in the field?

thanks alot.
Either works. I prefer the 170s because of accuracy, confidence, and just plain out and out prejudice.
 

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tenniso said:
i've been looking at the ballistics charts from remington, winchester, and federal. according to those charts, there is hardly any difference in velocity, energy, and trajectory between 150 and 170 grain bullets at 100 and 200 yards.

what is the general consensus/experiences regarding the performance of either bullet on deer and hogs? and what brands/types have the most consistent results in the field?

thanks alot.
Either works. I prefer the 170s because of accuracy, confidence, and just plain out and out prejudice.
 

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my 1954 336 (chambered in 30-30 Ackley) shoots 150 grain Speer FP best. It is not as accurate with the 170 grain. My new 336Y with 16 inch barrel is the opposite. That little carbine dotes on the Speer 170 FP.
A friend gifted me with 500 rounds of once fired Remmy brass. I have 400 reloaded now with the Speer 170fp. That ought to last me through this hunting season. :lol:
 

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My only criterion for choosing the 150 or the 170 for use on deer in a particular rifle is accuracy. Generally speaking, the .30-30's I've owned have shown a slight preference for 170 gr. loads, so usually that's what I'm using. If all I happen to have on hand is 150's, no big deal -- they'll both perform admirably on deer. If I were out after heavier game like bear or hogs, I'd likely default to the 170 even in a rifle that shot the 150's better just to be a bit more on the safe side penetration-wise.
 

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Let's just say its nearly too dark to shoot and the big herd buck just stepped out of the trees. A herd of mulies is feeding in a small meadow surrounded by pines and you're positioned for a good 125 yard shot.
He stands broadside for a fairly easy shot. You decide to shoot directly into the shoulder to drop him where he stands. You don't want him to bound away into the dark trees where findng him may take 15 minutes or longer. Temp is already nearly zero and the wind is picking up.

150 grain bullet will cause significant meat damage. The softer jacket and slightly higher impact velocity produces a wider wound channel. Great for lung shots but devastating when shoulder roasts are concerned.

170 grain bullet will drop the buck but meat damage will be minimal. Wound channel and penetration are adequate for even a moose at this distance. The 170 grain bullets are known for their deep penetration.

Hope this is helpful.
Jack
 

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I don't know... I've shot a bunch of whitetails through the shoulder with 170's and there was a lot of damage and bloodshot meat, so even if the 150's Do produce slightly more damage, I'm still going to have the same problem,
I'll stick with the 150's, I don't need deep penetration on broadside whitetails.
 

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First off I have seen no evidence that ashoulder hits drop deer any quicker unless it is a high one that damages the spine. If it is near zero temperature wise then the meat will be just fine if you have to find him in the morning. But I have never had a heart/lung shot deer travel more than 50 yards unless the bullet did not expand properly. The 150 will exit and there will be a good blood trail if needed.
 
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150 vs 170

:idea: This arguement is getting old. Bottom line is a heavier bullit will retain more energy down range. I have had no deer get away from my 336SC 32spl. using rem corlokt 170s and I have a 35 rem 200 corlokt that was picked from the under the skin of the frt sholder of a large 9 point that was shot by my Dad in '54 . It traveled from the left rear to the right frt sholder and was a perfectly mushroomed recovery about the diameter of a dime. I have experienced very little meat damage with the 170s in my 32spl. and the accuracy is sub MOA if I do my part. I have just added the 3030 to my 336SC collection so I have no data on that one ,but the 32 and 3030 are almost twins. My angle is .so what if the 170 is a little slower if it has more energy. a few FPS the deer don't know the difference BUT the extra thump he will notice. You look you decide......... :D ---Jim--
 

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Interestingly the 170 grain 32 Special bullet and the 200 grain 35 Remington bullet have sectional densities very similar the the 30-30's 150 grain bullet.
 
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