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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Need help deciding. I have been reloading for maybe 2 years now on a rockchucker single stage press. I really don't reload much as my work keeps me short on time. I can't see my self with a full blown progressive press,I don't shoot all that much. I am thinking of getting a new turrent press. I think it will help speed things up little and maybe streamline the process when I do have the time. So my question to you that are more experenced then me, Which turrent press should I buy? and why. Make sure you take the cost of the press out of the consideration. I reload 38/357 , 35 rem. 45-70gov and 44 mag. thanks Scott
 

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Hey Scott,

You may be well served with the Lee 4 hole turret. (there are a few "quirks" with these, and the guys that use them will be along to extol their virtues)

The Redding and RCBS are priced at what you can get a Dillon 550B for. (which greatly speeds things up, and greatly frees up time for shooting more, load all my rifle ammo on the Dillon 550B)

Later, Mark
 

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Repeat after me........turret. Turret. Turret. The first step in buying this type of press is realizing there is no "n" in its spelling.

I use and like the Lee 4 hole turret press, and it has pretty good reviews from nearly all of its users.

I do not consider the turret press as the same as a full blown progressive press, as it has a slower operation than a progressive but is much faster than a single stage so be sure you're not comparing apples to oranges when looking at press types. Be sure to compare the same thing.
 

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I use an old Spartan from time to time but mostly use my Rock Chucker single stage.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
HAHAHA! Ok ok turret! I do realize a Turret will not be as fast as a progressive,and I am ok with that. They are also simple like a single stage, that I like.
 

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If you decide on a RCBS turret press, many of these presses have some slop in the head of the press. I used several thin teflon washers to remedy this and has worked well. I primarily use my turret press for holding my seating dies and a herters super 3 for sizing. If the press would be mainly used for larger rifle calibers, a two stage skinner is a great press.
 

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Got two Lee turret presses---been using em now 13 years or so ain't got no complaint bout em-work fine!------Mine are the old 3 holers----2nd one came w/ auto advance feature---didn't care much for that as I use em as kinda a souped up single stage method!------Fill up a 50 round tray W/ clean brass------resize & deprime em all------use hand tool to prime em ( don't care much for primer arm on press)---I use Lee powder thru expanderdie --flare & powder em ( if needed I weigh brass before & after this stage)----3 rd stage seat & crimp-------Grab another tray of 50 & here we go again! The main reason I got 2 presses is the Lee's can easily be set for right hand or left hand lever operation-------Old guys shoulders give out --so swap turret over & use other arm!!--I love it that if ya got extra turrets it's so easy to change em out for diff. calib. or whatever! My only bad experience W/Lee is NEVER even think about their Pro 1000 progressive press It'll make ya say all kinds of dirty words!!!
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Thanks for the replies. At one point I thought I wanted the Redding T-7 as I like the idea that it is built so stout and would out last me. But I think the Lee Classic TURRET press will most likely out live me and more than handle the amount of reloading I do. Thanks again for your input.
 

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Lee 4 hole turret works fine for me, but I only have used it for .38/.357 and 9mm. Don't doubt it would do as well for the rifle calibers that I shoot.
 

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I like my Lee 4 hole Classic Turret press. It has a tube which catches the expended primers. I used to have a Lee 4 hole Deluxe but the primers fell all over the place. I've used it for .357, .38, 9mm, .45ACP, .45LC, .44 mag, .44 spl, 45-70, and 30-06 with no major problems. I don't like the priming system so I go with a hand primer.
 
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If you can afford it, you won't regret buying the Redding T7. It's strong as can be and the extra room for dies can come in handy. When loading .223 I have about 6 dies set up for various operations, including sizing, expanding (for cast bullets), bullet seating, crimping, trimming and primer pocket swaging.
 

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I have a Lee Classic Turret Press. It works great, and I, too, hand prime with the press. I've had it for a few years now, and have several turrets set up to load different calibers. I use it mainly for handgun cartridges, but I have loaded rifle cartridges on it. My most used turret is for loading 38 Special wadcutters and I have a RCBS Little Dandy Powder Measure threaded into one of the turret spots. I size all my cases and then turn the turret to the next spot, and bell the case mouths and prime the cases, then I turn the turret to the powder measure and charge the cases. When done with that, I just turn the turret and seat and crimp the bullets. It works great for me, and I can do a load of ammo in a hurry doing this. I shoot weekly, and with my turret press, I seem to always have enough ammo when range time comes. The press works great. You will probably do well with one.
 

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Much, much faster is to use the press as intended to index with each stroke so a completed round is turned out in 4 strokes. While others may prefer to run the press differently, all other methods are slower than this in time to turn out a loaded round. The other advantage is whenever you quit there are rounds completed. This is the advantage over batch processing, which does not produce a completed round until the last of the steps is finished (comparable to loading on a single stage press).
 

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An other vote for the Redding turret press.

But I do recommend that your visit your local firearms emporia and look at the turret presses on display. One just might "fit" you a bit better than the others.
 

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And still another vote for the Redding. I can group calibers and avoid a lot of turret changing. The press itself is as solid as they come, and still made in the U.S.A..
 

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The main difference between the Lee and other turret presses is the Lee indexes between stations automatically with each stroke of the handle. In this way it could be termed a semi-progressive, and it is somewhat faster in production. Or less busy, if you prefer, as your off hand is always advancing the turret if you want a different operation at every stroke with a non indexing turret press. Some turret users batch load, as mentioned, but this is a slower procedure.

Manually index the turret by hand between die stations does save you the drudgery of screwing the dies in and out. I also have the Lyman turret press, a Spar-T that has T Mag turret heads.

The point in favor of the Lee is the turrets are relatively cheap and can have the dies more or less permanently set up and never in need of readjustment. Just remove the existing turret and replace with another, a matter of about five seconds.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Thanks for replies and advice. I was out to Sportsmans Whse and the had a Redding T-7 for 284.00. I didn't see a Lee classic turret but I know what they go for. Still trying to decide!
 

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I started out with a Lyman T-Mag II...which works fine but; it's a little slow for turning out handgun ammo....I recently purchased a Dillon 550 B and I fear that my Lyman won't see much use anymore...since you are moving from a single stage to a turret style reloader you might look at a Dillon Basic...it's a 550B without the automatic priming and powder systems and costs about $250.00.
 
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