Marlin Firearms Forum banner

1 - 19 of 19 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
225 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Lyman seems to have 2 distinct philosophies for indexing rimmed cases. Their E-Z and Accu trimmers look like they index off the rim face, their others index off the case base. I just talked to their Technician & he is not concerned with rim thickness of rimmed cartridges, telling me "I'm splitting hairs." I mentioned that was my prerogative, not his directive. Seems the E-Z ($29) setup should work fine, but then he reports they have determined the pilot length using 1/2 SAAMI spec for the rim thickness, so the average rim thickness should work for everyone. I asked if this 'preset' pilot was adjustable at all, and he said he thought it might be, using the setscrew.

I have about 1K WW cases, half are new. Are their other [affordable] case trimmers you could recommend for consideration? Thanks for watching.

Wally
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,776 Posts
Never cared for the easy trimmer when doing cases in any quantity greater than 1, very tiring since you hold in your hands, at least the way I used it. The accu trimmer is the way to go, or better yet the universal trimmer with power.

I have always measured my case length from the base to case mouth, but I understand your point. There are differences in rim thickness out there, and shooting loads with different rim thickness mixed together can effect accuracy. I really notice it in 22 Hornet.
 
  • Like
Reactions: dhansen

·
Registered
Joined
·
283 Posts
+1 for the L.E. WILSON Ultimate Trimmer. You get what you pay for so I decided to pay more for one of if not the best manual trimmer out there. If I shot more I would get the Dillon powered trimmer.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,169 Posts
Another vote for the Wilson, American made, super simple, good folks to deal with.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
225 Posts
Discussion Starter #9 (Edited)
35rem: Initially to standardize/trim 500 new WW .45-70 cases..then my used WW .45-70 WW brass. I'm re-evaluating my headspace & boolit design before any trimming. I see where SAAMI calls for the .45-70 rim to be .070" +0.00", -.010" thick.

In 6 months or so, I might expect to see an AR-10 platform (.308) show up, so those cases will need attention. That's about it, for now. Thanks.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,005 Posts
Walstr,
I do think you are making a mountain out of a mole hill, however, if you wish to measure from the forward face of the rim on rimmed cartridges, I believe you will need to measure and segregate your brass by rim thickness and calculate how far to trim the case body. Regarding the .45-70, I find that most brass is way short (1.85 inch as opposed to 2.1) and may not need or want any trimming. Your rimless brass will require a base to mouth measurement for sure.

As far as case trimmers go, in my opinion, Wilson and Forster are the best; the Forster is faster to use when adapted to power operation.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Walstr and GaCop

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
5,492 Posts
It sounds like you are wanting the trimming method to set correct case length while the case is headspacing off the face of the rim to simulate the firing condition. I suppose how much that mattered depends upon whether you had precise dimensions from rim recess to end of chamber and start of leade, but if you are evaluating bullet design maybe you have those dimensions already.

If those dimensions were indeed known precisely, even base indexing trimmers could be adjusted to compensate for rim thickness....but then of course that would vary, potentially, if a different brand or lot of brass with a different rim thickness is used, so you'd have to refigure a new trim-to-length. I further presume you view that as more of a hassle than rim indexing trimmers, and you want to set the engagement surface of the bullet some precise distance from the lands no matter the case brand or lot used based on a common overall length.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,455 Posts
Well I have been using the Lyman power case trimmer for quite a while now . It has an automatic universal case head chuck , and uses a pilot to lien up the mouth of the case . once you get it set up for a caliber , it's pretty fast . I developed my own method for inserting the case's in that chuck , and that made it a little More faster for me and consistent . Beat's a hand crank ALL to Heck , I think anyhow... You can also buy an optional carbide cutter for the machine , which lasts a Long time . The one I have on my machine has cut around 6000 cases now and Still going pretty strong .

It come with two none carbide cutters , and the work very well by them self's also . I used one for probably 2000 cases , and seen where they do make the carbide cutters , and opted to buy myself one . Couldn't tell much difference in the two , as far as cutting faster or slower , but I'm sure the carbide cutter last's much longer ....


Magnum6
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
9,280 Posts
Which reloading press indexes off the rim face and not the case base?
Not sure that would be a good idea. As I understand it rims on rimmed cases can vary in thickness. Action lockup is ultimately determined by the bolt adjustment. Basing die adjustment or COAL on the top of the rim versus the base could increase tolerances. That's my layman's observation.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
5,492 Posts
I think Ima's point was you've no choice with presses because all push on the base of the case when shoving it into the die. The front of the rim doesn't enter into the equation except when pulling the brass out of the die.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,656 Posts
I don't know the answer to the OP, but I think I see his point.

I'm not that good a shooter, handloader or bullet caster to take advantage of either method over the other.
..
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,295 Posts
I think Ima's point was you've no choice with presses because all push on the base of the case when shoving it into the die. The front of the rim doesn't enter into the equation except when pulling the brass out of the die.
Yes sir, that was my point. If you trim your cases by indexing off the front of the rim, you actually introduce more variability into your loads, not less, since all other loading functions are indexed on the base.
 
1 - 19 of 19 Posts
Top