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Well guys I need help again,what ammo do I need to start with as I don't have a clue about the 45-70
I know where there is some Remington Core Lok and some Leverevelotion but I don't which one to start with..
 

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Hey 1022,

For venison, any of the 300 gr hollow points will work well. As will the 325 gr H'Day.

The 405 gr Remington will take most other game, very nicely.

Later, Mark
 

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I started with the Hornady because thats all I could get at the time. I have since run 405g Remingtons and 430g +P HSM Bear loads through it. The Rems are the easiest to shoot, and the Hornadys too, but the HSM +P stuff has a more profound thump to it. I would try both the Rem, and Hornadys and see which one you and or your 1895 likes the best for now. You may as well start shopping for reloading equipment too! I fought the concept for a long time, but alas, I have succumb to the reality that...it must be done. I have started picking up this and that, so I can get started with...another incredibly expensive hobby. Happy shootin!
 

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1022,

Getting 45/70 ammo may be a situation of buying what you can find.

Just be aware that the Hornady FTX is ammo loaded in non-standard length brass which causes issue for some folks depending on the die set in use.

Also, the FTX although it shoots very well in many rifles and is likely about the cheapest thing you can find in loaded ammo also has a bullet integrity issue.

Unless used in extreme situations, likely no one will say that it won't put a critter down, but be aware that a poor hit which contacts bone or heavy muscle is going to cause excessive meat damage.

There are just much better options available.

For handloading, one of the best options is a cast Bullet of 400gr or more which has a large meplat or what is commonly called a Wide Flat Nose (WFN).

If your an experienced hunter with jacketed bullets, the cast WFN of 400+gr. at a velocity of 1400 - 1700fps will kill all out of expectations, without excessive meat loss.

No need to push warp speeds to get er done. In fact, the cast WFN bullet cast of the proper alloy and which is basically a non-expanding bullet can also produce excessive meat loss.

My first cast bullet critter was taken with a 355gr WFN at a muzzle velocity of about 2300fps and I never want to see that big of a wound channel again. Not devastation such as with a poor jacketed bullet, just a HUGE wound channel, way beyond what I would have ever expected.

Welcome aboard and enjoy a great rifle/caliber.

Crusty Deary Ol'Coot
 

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Do you re-load? If so get whatever you can shoot it smile go home re-load repeat.
Just bare in mind the LE brass is a touch shorter than other 45-70 brass
 
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I'll second that. If you reload, start with 45-70 dies. Finding brass has proven impossible for me, so I've bought a few boxes of Black Hills since they use Starline brass, were about as inexpensive as I could find, and was in stock at Cabela's.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Was into reloading years ago,but haven't done any in ages...Don't have any equipment now...
 

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The Hornady LeveRevolution 325gr stuff is fantastically accurate in mine, and will kill anything on this continent. I can't see using anything else right now.

Luis
 
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The FTX killing anything on this continent may well depend on the how and where the critter is hit, due to that bullets lack of integrity.

As good as the results may be most of the time, I would not put that load against the big bears. It only takes one bad hit to mess up what started out as a good day.

I've seen the damage on a mature White tail buck and I surely would not be one to take it elk hunting.

Penetration will not be long if the going gets tough, bone or heavy tissue being hit, simply due to the over expansion of this fragile design.

As I said earlier, the load tends to be accurate and with good hits it will usually put a critter down OK.

However, hunting being what hunting is, there are no guarantees as to where the bullet will strike as once the trigger is pulled it is out of our hands, NO MATTER how perfect we held. Critters do move and a poor hit for whatever reason could present us with less then desirable results.

AS said, there are better bullets available.

To each his own and it is very good that we have so many options, but why not choose a bullet which provides us with better integrity and more margin for error when available.

Crusty Deary Ol'Coot
 
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