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I've read several fine posts that taught me not to be jealous of the super magnums that are intrinsically limited in penetration due to their high velocity.

"The faster they go, the less the penetration." e.g. "A thinly jacketed .2x caliber at 27xx fps blows up on a hog 'shield', but a .45-70-4xx blows thru."

I've wrapped my mind around this concept, reading stories about the success of Nosler "Partition" style bullets, where the nose disintegrates and the enclosed lead body continues to penetrate. Now my handloading question becomes;
"How do I estimate the terminal velocity for a given muzzle velocity, for my .45-70-405 hard cast handloads?"

I need to get a better idea of how my 20:1/30:1 cast bullets might hold up at 150yds (max) with various (non lead fouling) IMR 3031 loadings. Thanks much.

Wally
 

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I'm thinking that the best way to see how your cast bullets will hold up at that range and velocity is to shoot them into some medium that allows recovery and examination.

But, to answer the question- one way is with a chronograph and ballistics software. If you know the ballistic coefficient of your bullet- or find one similar and use that ballistic coefficient- you can calculate your bullet's velocity for any desired range. If you don't want to get the software you can look up ballistics tables in most any reloading manual. You can also get detailed information about trajectory either way.


M
 
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