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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm buying a 1893 in 30-30 caliber [see Marlin collectors heading in this forum]I don't see any problem with modern loads and jacketed bullets but will probably get a mold for lead bullets as soon as possible.Any suggestions?Any loads?The rifle was made in 1900.Does any body know if the saddle ring is a split ring or is it solid ?if it's split are the butt ends welded or braised or just left as an open butt joint?I need to replace the ring as it was removed by someone ,probably to keep it quiet.If someone has one of these could they send me the dimensions[ stock thickness,diameter and circumfirence of the ring ]I feel pretty safe in assuming the material is either mild steel or possibly wrought iron.shootrj2003
 

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The ring on a Marlin saddlering carbine is identical to that used on early Winchester carbines. It is a split ring, and they can be fopund at Wisners! They may not list them for Marlins, so check under Winchester model 1894 carbines, if they don't.
They are mild steel, and at about $5, not worth trying to make one in my opinion. I can measure mine if you want to try to make one? The ends are simply butted together, with no weld, or solder.

www.wisnersinc.com

As for loads, I sure wouldn't shoot any factory loads in your 1893, and I don't shoot jacketed in mine. The modern factory .30-30 load is a bit hotter than I would feel comfortable shooting in a 100 year old gun.
My cast lead bullet is a 150 grain, which I cast in an old Ideal mold. I use 10 grains of Unique, which chronographs at around 1575 fps. I also have a 120 grain mold that I load with 9 grains of Unique, for around 1500 fps. Both are good accurate loads, with very mild recoil, and report. Not much leading at these velocities either.
Enjoy your new model 1893!
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
MM-93',You seem pretty sure that modern rounds are too hot for these old rifles so I'll take your advice and wait to shoot it until I can obtain some lead cast bullets and load some of my own milder loads for it.I checked Wisner's and they do list a saddle ring assembly [they call it a sling ring assembly]but they charge 15.50 for the assembly and the Winchester ring is only 3.50 so my cheap ass is gonna go for the Winchester part.Besides I don't need the whole assembly,whatever that may consist of[theres no picture]thanks for the scoop on Wisner's, never heard of them before.I'm on vacation for a week now and just got back from shootin' up at the old lead mines,I shot my 1894 .44,my 336 in .35 Rem.,my mod.39 and my Savage in 17 HMR. thats a good way to kick off the vacation huh?!Shot Win..44 Mag.240 gr.sp and was kind of dissapointed they were all over the place at 100 yds.I think they might be too hot because the magtechs I shot the other day went in a nice tight group of 3 in. [factory iron sights] but first I'll scrub the bore real good ,I also picked up a williams peep sight I'll install that tonight and shoot again maybe tomorrow.I don't want to twist your ear off so catch you latershootrj2003
 

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Glad I could help Shooter! The "assembly" for the Marlin is the staple and the ring together. Since you still have the staple, the ring is all you need, and the Winnie unit is the way to go, as they're identical. Good thing you have the staple, as they're a nightmare to stake in place if it wasn't there! Marlin must have had a special tool to do that procedure, because I've done a few for others, and it's no fun working through the side ejection port!
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
MM93, just got around to answering your last post and I was thinking that was what the assembly probably was and sort of figured they would stake it in place. I could see why it could be a pain in the ass to put in ,on the other hand its probably fairly secure once in. Thanks for the load info. I'm gonna see if any one around here sells .30 cal. lead bullets if not i'll order some from somebody. any suggestions? shooterj2003
 

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shootrj2003,

Regarding commercial cast bullets for the .30-30, I would suggest any one of the following. Unless you know what the groove dimension is for your rifle, I would suggest .310" diameter bullets where possible. :

http://missoula.bigsky.net/western/cbip/b311291.html
The 311291 was the first cast bullet (1906-1907) designed for the .30-30 and works very well.

http://missoula.bigsky.net/western/cbip/b30-150-fn.html
The RCBS 150 gr. is about the best 150 gr. bullet made for the .30-30 in my experience.

http://www.beartoothbullets.com/bulletselect/index.htm
Go down the left hand side of the page to .30 caliber. Their 140-170 gr. options will work well.

http://www.trueshotbullets.com/bullets.html
The 170 gr. gas checked version is similar to the 311291 except that it has a flat nose.

With regards to loads for any of these bullets, choose you favorite powder / load for jacketed bullets and use that. Personal favorites are 34 / 748 with the 150 RCBS and 36 / H414 with any of the 170 grainers.

The .30-30 cartridge has been loaded to similar pressures since it's introduction in 1895. A fellow I know has a 1894 Winchester made in 1896 and he has been shooting factory ammunition in it for several years with no problem whatsoever. His rifle is in very good condition however.
It would seem that any firearm IN GOOD CONDITION manufactured for use with the .30-30 cartridge should be able to use current factory ammunition with no trouble. Just my .02.

Good luck,
w30wcf
 

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The only 1893 Marlins I would not load factory ammunition in are the ones marked for black powder only. All of my 1893's except one are fired with standard pressure loads. One of my 1893's is a black powder only rifle, and so I only load black in it. I only have one made after 1894, and six made in 1893, none show any sign of headspace problems. As long as factory pressures are adheared to no problems should arise. My 1936 is chambered in 32-40 Winchester, and the Model 36 is chambered in 32 Winchester Special. Acording to Marlin all 1893's, Model 93, Model 1936, and the Model 36 utilized the same receiver right up to WWII.

Lee L.
 

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I'm especially interested in this thread and what type of ammunition can be fired in an 1893 Marlin 30-30 (serial number 164368, I believe manufactured in 1898 ). This was my Dad's 30-30 and I'm very interested in shooting the rifle. The octagon barrel is stamped "Special Smokeless Steel", and overall the rifle is in extremely good condition. It's a takedown 30-30.
 

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I have shot Federal Blue Box 150gr loads in my 1912 vintage 1893...I have not shot a lot, but have and will again shoot a few...

I have been shooting light loads using Red Dot under cast boolits with data from here:

Lever Gun Performance Studies
 

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Thanks, and I appreciate the feedback. I don't do reloading of any kind, so I'm likely to purchase "off the shelf" ammo, likely at Gander Mountain or BassPro (I have reasonable access to either). Is there an off the shelf 30-30 ammo you would recommend? You seem to do OK with the Federal 150gr loads mentioned in your update. I was looking at the 150gr bullet and the 170gr bullet and am leaning toward the 150gr bullet. My thinking there is the lighter bullet will put less stress on the receiver.

Again, I don't reload, so whatever I end up shooting will be sold through Gander Mountain or BassPro, although I could check in to Dick's Sporting Goods. I'm very interested in shooting the rifle, but not at the risk of damaging it or someone getting hurt.

Again, thanks.
 

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I shoot modern loads in my 1901 Model 1893.
 

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I, too, shoot modern loads in my 1914 Model 1893 takedown in 32 WIN. As long as they are in good mechanical shape and built for smokeless powder, they are more than compatible with modern ammo.
 

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By that we're meaning jacketed bullets, round tip or flat tip. Correct? I'll probably go with a 150gr bullet which I think would put less stress on the receiver than the 170gr bullet. I'm planning to takedown the rifle this evening or tomorrow and give it a thorough going over and cleaning and inspection of the bore.
 

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The .30-30 has always been a jacketed-bullet round. Today's factory loads of whatever bullet weight are exactly right for your 1893, assuming it is in sound condition.
 

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Awesome. This is a great forum. Thanks to all for your feedback. I'll be in NW Georgia this weekend and am planning to take the 1893 and also my Dad's .45 auto and shoot both, and also get in some deer hunting (Rem 700 BDL in 30-06 for that though). Again, thanks everyone.
 

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I have a 1893 30-30, it says "smokless steel" on the barrel, The rifle was my dads and he bought it in the 30's, I think it was made about 1923. My Dad, Myself and my Son have all shot deer with it using modern 150/170 gr ammo. No issues. I've retired it now and so shoot a 336y or 1894 44mag.
 
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