Marlin Firearms Forum banner

1 - 17 of 17 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
18 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I'm relatively new to leverguns but I recently purchased 3 new SDTs and received them today.
(2) 1895s and (1) 336 (I didn't really want the 336 but had to buy it to obtain both 1895s)

My observations and concerns-

I like the compactness of the SDTs and the exterior fit and finish were fine. The roughness of the internals certainly didn't inspire confidence but I can polish them if necessary.

All three of the rifles had the front sight shrouds detached and floating loose in the bag.
Not a major problem but it was likely responsible for a couple of very faint scratches on the receiver and barrel.

The front fiber optic on the 336 was broken.
An annoyance but not a major concern.

One of the rifles had a somewhat heavy but crisp trigger. The others two may get replaced.

My real concern is with one of the 1895s. It would cyle fine if moved quickly. A slow cycle however, would cause it to "freeze up" just before the carrier drops down. At this point the cycle could be completed but only with a serious increase in pressure which resulted in the carrier "snapping" rather than "dropping" into place.

After innumerable cycles it has improved to the point where it only occasionally catches when cycled gently and never when cycled hard. (but when it does catch it is still as hard to lock up as before)

What do you think is causing this?
Would it be easy to remedy with fine abrasives and a buffing machine?
I hate to waste the time and money to send it back to Marlin if the fix is easily remedied at home!

Thank you for your help!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
31 Posts
Sorry I don't have any answers just some similar observations. I bought two 1895SDT rifles and one of them had the front sight hood floating around in the bag and scratches in the finish of the receiver. Having taken 3 1/2 months of paperwork and waiting to import the two rifles into Canada sending it back is not an option. I havn't had a chance to play with them yet so cannot comment on the functioning. Seems like poor quality control for such a limited number of rifles. One of the rifles is destined to accompany me on the trapline so it was bound to get some scratches eventually so I guess I will just live with it. Jim
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5,925 Posts
IMO, it's the way you're cycling it. They are meant to be cycled with authority and NOT like you're babying the thing. Keep cycling dummy rounds through them all and they'll get smoother in time.

The scratches on your stainless rifle can be easily removed by using dark red (maroon) industrial grade Scotch Brite. I use it on my stainless Guide Gun with A+ results.

BTW, welcome to MO's
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
10,610 Posts
SH said:
I'm relatively new to leverguns but I recently purchased 3 new SDTs and received them today.
(2) 1895s and (1) 336 (I didn't really want the 336 but had to buy it to obtain both 1895s)

My observations and concerns-

I like the compactness of the SDTs and the exterior fit and finish were fine. The roughness of the internals certainly didn't inspire confidence but I can polish them if necessary.

All three of the rifles had the front sight shrouds detached and floating loose in the bag.
Not a major problem but it was likely responsible for a couple of very faint scratches on the receiver and barrel.

The front fiber optic on the 336 was broken.
An annoyance but not a major concern.

One of the rifles had a somewhat heavy but crisp trigger. The others two may get replaced.

My real concern is with one of the 1895s. It would cyle fine if moved quickly. A slow cycle however, would cause it to "freeze up" just before the carrier drops down. At this point the cycle could be completed but only with a serious increase in pressure which resulted in the carrier "snapping" rather than "dropping" into place.

After innumerable cycles it has improved to the point where it only occasionally catches when cycled gently and never when cycled hard. (but when it does catch it is still as hard to lock up as before)

What do you think is causing this?
Would it be easy to remedy with fine abrasives and a buffing machine?
I hate to waste the time and money to send it back to Marlin if the fix is easily remedied at home!

Thank you for your help!

SH,

What you describe is the lever interacting with the carrier rocker. You can smooth it action by removing the carrier ans polishing the edges and corners of the rocker on the carrier. Also, with the lever out of the gun, inspect and polish the interacting surface on the lever.
You don't want to remove much metal, just ease the sharp corners and polish and burnish the surfaces.

RE: The broken front sight, call Marlin gun service for a warranty replacement.


Tom
NRA LIFE
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5,925 Posts
Lost Texan said:
Thanks six_gunz. Do you happen to know who makes the action polishing grease that contains pumice?

I've never used such a product, so sorry I can't help. Maybe someone else can help you with that.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
18 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
Thanks for the tips!

It has smoothed up considerably after repeated cycling.
I will try deburring and buffing the carrier/rocker to (hopefully) completely eliminate the problem.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
18 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
IT IS CURED!

I stripped it down and lightly sanded every jagged and burred edge (almost every part and edge in the rifle) with 400 then 600 grit wet (oiled) sand paper.
I then buffed every piece and reassembled.

The difference is absolutely AMAZING!
I can not make it freeze up anymore.
The Hornady LE loads that just barely cycled before (very rough and clunky) will now slide through it smoothly with virtually no effort.

For never having opened up a levergun before, I am VERY pleased with the results!

Now its time to start making up loads and chronographing velocity from the 16 inch barrel.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
18 Posts
Discussion Starter #12
Chrono data-
Hornady 325 (factory) MV ~1825 with 52fps extreme spread
I will work on handloads over the weekend.

More 1895 Problems!

The first 1895 is functioning great after having all internal parts "dehorned". (see above posts)
(except for the absolutely horrible trigger pull that appears to be normal for this breed)

The other 1895 exhibited better action and upon opening it up the parts appeared to have a much better finish (almost as if these were tumbled and they weren't in the other rifle)
Despite the apparent smoothness (when empty) it was VERY difficult to chamber rounds.
So, I sanded and buffed the internals and expected perfection when I loaded it up.
Hmmm, still miserable... It appears that the extractor is over sized making it difficult for the case rim to engage the bolt face.
The bolt from the other 1895 functioned perfectly when I temporarily swapped them for a feeding test.

I have been unable to reach Marlin (always busy) but I will see if they will send a replacement extractor. (and a front sight for the 336SDT) In the meantime I will try to modify the defective extractor.

In summary- Two new 1895SDTs and both were almost nonfunctioning.
I haven't even tried to feed rounds through the 336SDT but I am becoming more inclined to sell or trade it before I find out if it functions properly. It had the broken front fiber optic and all 3 of the rifles had loose sight hoods in the box (which in some cases left faint "tracks" across the wood and metal)

Has anyone else had these types of problems?
Did I really just beat the odds on having 2/2 "lemons"?

My excitement has turned to disgust after spending several hours fixing problems that should have been detected and remedied before the rifles left the factory!

Marlin's brand equity is sinking to new depths in my book.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
23,784 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
18 Posts
Discussion Starter #14
Thanks swany.

I slightly reshaped it, polished it and bent it back a bit.
It can now be smoothly cycled in slow motion.
I can also "toss one in" and have it close without binding.

At last both of the 1895s are functioning to my satisfaction! (at least with the Hornady flex tips)
and...
I couldn't stand it any longer. I grabbed the 336 and a few cartridges.
They fed superbly! What a relief.
No additional tweaking appears necessary!

I appreciate the tips and comments.
This forum is a wealth of information!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
413 Posts
SH

This is a Hobby, Just think how much you just learned about your rifles. Yes we all a want perfect gun right out of the box. You hope the person on the assembly line building your rifle did not stay up all night drinking and fighting with the wife or husband.

You took the time to make it right for you, Be proud, be happy,

Oh by the way my action on my 1895 SDT sucks to! ;D

Moshin46
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
18 Posts
Discussion Starter #16
Hi moshin46.

You are correct.
I learned a lot about the rifles while I was working on them!
I guess every cloud does have a silver lining.

I don't think the person on the assembly line was hungover or angry.
I think they just forgot to show up for work.

I'm sorry the action sucks on your 1895 SDT.
Here is a suggestion...take it apart, sand and buff every part, reassemble and make sure the extractor is adjusted properly.
In a couple of short hours you will have a nicely functioning rifle! :)
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
7,648 Posts
six_gunz said:
Lost Texan said:
Thanks six_gunz. Do you happen to know who makes the action polishing grease that contains pumice?

I've never used such a product, so sorry I can't help. Maybe someone else can help you with that.
Mix a little automotive valve lapping compound (very fine grit) with some grease and you have it. Auto rubbing compound also works well, just apply to rough parts and cycle 50 to 100 times. Thoroughly clean all inside parts to remove the compounds and lightly lube. Works for me and dozens of gunsmiths.

.
 
1 - 17 of 17 Posts
Top