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I must admit, I have never shot a gun with a peep sight. I have a 336 in 35 remington that came with a scope on it. I do not like how it feels with the scope on it and have taken it off. I will be using this rifle to hunt deer with and will generally be used at 100 yards or less. How does a peep sight enhance open sights? Does it make it easy to aim at 100 yards and less then on stock sights? Do I need to replace the front sight if I install a peep sight? I am clueless on this and any help you can give me would be great. On a side note I have good eyes still as I am only 30 years old. Thanks in advance for all your help...
 

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Joel,
There are a few reasons I like the peepers. First, remember that many of mine are on tang sights. Both the Winchester type and the larger vernier sights like on my Sharps 1874's and single shots. But the same principle applies to a levergun too.
First, it typically extends the distance betweeen the front and back sights. This in turn makes for more accuracy.
Second, they are easier to find and acquire a target as the need arises.
Third, they tend to focus better for older eyes.
Fourth, it is any light, this would probably be the best sighting system I have found for quick target acquisition in low light.
Fifth, they tend to make even a poor shot like me, look better on paper.Good luck on your hunt!
Larry
 

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Peep sights are inherently more accurate that open sights because it's natural to place the front sight in the center of the peep. Even with good eyesight it's not possible to clearly focus on both sights and the target. Since the rear sight will will always be slightly out of focus, you can still accurately place the front bead in the center of a fuzzy circle more accurately than trying to place it in a fuzzy notch. The downside to the peep sight is that you lose the ability to see through it in low light. The larger the hole that you use in your peep will allow you to use it in darker conditions, but it will be less accurate than a smaller diameter hole. I had always used a peep sight on my slug gun until one evening right at the last ten minutes of legal hours. When I tried to aim at a buck, my entire peep was a solid black dot. Luckily he was only about 25 yards away and I killed him by pointing the gun instinctively at him. That winter I brought that gun into the machine shop where I worked and I drilled and tapped the receiver for a mount that I machined, and it's worn a scope ever since.
 

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The downside to the peep sight is that you lose the ability to see through it in low light.
This is right on. I will typically use my peep sighted rifle for A.M. hunts only. My peeped 30TK is a good walking rifle for hunts that involve creeping around in new areas. I feel like the peep is good for quick shots, more so than a scope on low power. But I have scopes on any rifle that I take to a deer stand that I'll sit at until legal shooting is over.
 

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Ever notice most battle rifles all have rear peeps on them.
For quick target acquisition.
 

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Pard said:
Ever notice most battle rifles all have rear peeps on them.
For quick target acquisition.
There's no doubt that they are more accurate and easier to use than open sights. It's also easier to train someone who's never shot before how to use a peep sight. Most of us here have shot guns our whole lives, but a large percentage of soldiers shoot their first gun during boot camp. A very good method to use is to have a peep sight with a screw in apperature. By changing the apperatures with various hole diameters, it becomes possible to find what diameter hole works best for you. With a screw in apperature it's also possible to remove the apperature when the sun starts setting, basically turning the peep sight into a ghost ring sight, which will allow some light to be seen when looking through it.
 

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And don't forget reduced weight, better handling, more rugged and less costly!!!

Makes you feel more like John Wayne than his katy elder son with a scoped rifle!!! ;D 8) 8) 8)
 

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I can see more of the target area than when using buckhorns.

The Williams FP I bought came with a front sight, but I like the front sight that came with my rifle better.
 

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To help (not cure) the low light problem with my peep sites I bought inserts with larger holes and brass ring inserted around the hole. It helps reflect a little more light and they do work. Most often I'm in the woods with the
insert removed and using the aperture like a ghost ring site. That works too. Early morning and late evening I screw the brass inserted apperture in and remove it during daylight hours.
358 Win
 

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No one has addressed depth of field... Looking through an aperture increases the ability to focus on objects at different distances. This becomes increasingly important with age. I lost the ability to use blade sights on rifles a long time ago. I simply can't focus on the front sight and see the target. But with an aperture, no problem.
 

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What makes peeps so fast to use IMO is the fact that ones eye is normally drawn to the brightest spot in the aperture, centering the eye in the center of the aperture automatically, so one does not consciously have to aim with the rear sight. One just looks through it and places the front sight on the target.

There is no need to worry about how high the front site is in the notch of a rear sight consistently. I find that the most difficult thing with shooting regular open sights quickly is getting consistent height of the front sight in the notch of the rear sight. When shooting at paper targets and taking plenty of time to focus and aim it's a lot easier to use the regular opens than when a quick shot is required on game in the woods, especially as one's eyes get older, and mine are 65 years old. Years ago, when my eyes were much younger and sharper, I used to do a lot of hunting in the woods of NYS with an aperture sighted Winchester 94 in .30-30.

The old eyeballs are why my hunting rifles are all scoped nowadays, although I fantasize sometimes about using one of my aperture sighted Marlins in hunting instead of just at the range where I find them to be a lot of fun.

If I ever hunt hogs with dogs, where shots are taken at very close range, I very well may try it. I've got two aperture sighted 24" barreled waffle top Marlins, .35 Remington and .30-30, that might just fit the bill in that kind of situation.
 

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Another factor is "margin of error" for the human eye. Smarter people than I am have figured out that "on average", factory iron sight allow you to shoot about 4" groups at 100 yards, on your best day. A peep cuts than down to 2" and a scope anywhere fron zero to 1", depending upon the power. Now, you can kill every booger in the woods with a 4" shooter, but consider this; a 2" grouping levergun at hunting distances for big game is like using a .5" bolt gun for varmints. It gives you far more than you really need, but moving, living critters don't give you alot of time, nor the best angle. I like to "finesse" a bullet through a hole in the brush if needed, or to put the bullet in a small kill area, i.e. head/neck area.
I too use the "Twilight" apertures with the brass insert, it works swell. You may or may not have to change your front sight, depending upon your load, but it's no biggy. Go for it!
 

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If you're young enough - go enlist, there's some fine Sergeants who delight in teaching young men to shoot well with "peep" sights. ;)
 

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Sir,

Peep sights are not anymore accurate than properly used factory sights and in some cases like XS ghost rings or trueglo where the front sight is rather large it can be less accurate.

Ghost and large peeps are a bit faster and more natural to center but in thicker cover natural shadows can actually put you off target a little. They also work better with running game which isn't a concern to me anymore.

Using a smaller ap on the peep with a thinner front sight like the Skinner combo works really well at greater distance. The Skinner front is durable to boot. I personally would opt for an XS ghost rear with a Skinner front sight.

I use XS ghost rings and they are deadly accurate up to 85 yards then my groups spread to about 3" at 100-150 yards.

Goodluck
 

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They are fast in the woods. They don't fog up. Minute of a deer. Usually cheap. Classic look.

Large, black sights suck on tiny black bullseyes. Harder to sight in than a scope. They don't give you any more range than iron sights.
 

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"Minute of a deer"

Yeah, thats what I was trying to say ;D
 

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If you're actually serious about hunting, NONE. They may be cheap, they may be more accurate than standard rifle sights, they may look cool, they may be a lighter; and on and on and on. But a quality scope will not let you down in low-light conditions, is extremely dependable, and just as rugged when used correctly (peeps are subject to damage also). For my money, this old geezer will continue to use a Leupold; as a quality scope is always worth the extra bucks, and will allow you to take deer like the buck below when it is so dark it is impossible to see a deer thru a peep site. Had I lost this chance because I had limited myself to a peep sight; I'd still be kicking myself!
 

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Rachethead said:
If you're actually serious about hunting, NONE... Had I lost this chance because I had limited myself to a peep sight; I'd still be kicking myself!
Some might say that if you were serious about hunting, you wouldn't limit yourself by using an outdated lever gun with such short range capability. Imagine you'd only had a shot at that deer when it was 400 yards off. With that lever gun, you'd have to pass. So is it true to say that anyone who is actually serious about hunting will only use a fancy new magnum?
 
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