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I have looked over the options and here are the items I have chose to make a kit of

North American Rescue CAT tourniquet (For arms and legs)

roll gauze and Israeli bandages for wound packing (For shoulders and Torso)

Hyfin vented chest seals (For neck to belt line)

As I can afford I intend to add a 2nd of everything to my kit

Opinions or advice?

What is the opinion on wound packing agents like bleedstop?
 

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Definitely carry a second tourniquet. I consider both trauma shears and a nasopharyngeal airway to be essentials, for cutting away clothing and establishing an airway on an unconscious patient, respectively.

A triangle bandage is another handy item, though I'd consider it to be outside the scope of a ready-access trauma kit. Its main purpose is as a sling, which is very useful in a backcountry scenario where the patient needs to be ambulatory.
 

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I'd add a Kotex or two, as well as some tampons. Don't laugh -- they make amazingly good wound dressings and are cheap.
 

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The blood clot agent dressings are fine for oozing wounds, but if there is arterial or a good sized vein bleeding, it won't stop it. Be prepared to apply direct pressure over the bleeding until medical care can be provided. I am a Surgical assistant and we use blood clotting agents on a regular basis for oozing tissue, but we need to cauterize or tie off vessels to stop them from bleeding.
Study the anatomy of main blood vessels so you can recognize where to apply pressure. We study the anatomy of our quarry to make clean kills and dress the animal, so it's not hard to do the same for humans.
OP, the only thing I would add to you kit is duct tape and I am not joking. It will help hold pressure on dressings and help with water and dirt contamination.
Andrew
 

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The blood clot agent dressings are fine for oozing wounds, but if there is arterial or a good sized vein bleeding, it won't stop it. Be prepared to apply direct pressure over the bleeding until medical care can be provided. I am a Surgical assistant and we use blood clotting agents on a regular basis for oozing tissue, but we need to cauterize or tie off vessels to stop them from bleeding.
Study the anatomy of main blood vessels so you can recognize where to apply pressure. We study the anatomy of our quarry to make clean kills and dress the animal, so it's not hard to do the same for humans.
OP, the only thing I would add to you kit is duct tape and I am not joking. It will help hold pressure on dressings and help with water and dirt contamination.
Andrew

Thanks for reminding me Andrew , I was gonna ask what the opinion was on the best tape to carry
 

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Andrew is right about the duct tape,working on farms for years duct tape and toilet paper were our band aids! Most everything I own has duct tape holding something together,why not us!
 

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Hey Andrew, I’ve always wondered how downstream tissue/organs get oxygen when an artery is severed via trauma or surgery?
Is necrosis common, especially due to trauma injuries?
It really depends upon which arteries/ veins are damaged. Each extremity, the head and torso has major arteries and veins that supply the blood flow. Let's take the leg for instance. The femoral artery provides the flow into the leg, if that is severed, the chance of losing that leg (if not life itself) is great. Some folks with diseased (blockage) of the femoral artery will developed a secondary blood supply to the leg. This happens because the disease is a slow progress and the body has the time to adjust to it.
When we do surgery, the team is always cognizant of major arteries and veins. We identify various blood vessels before disecting the surrounding tissue/organ. There is a fairly new technology we use that allows us, through a special camera, to see the blood perfusion in tissue. The perfused tissue developes a bright green glow, if it doesn't glow green in the area of concern, it's due to the vascularity being compromised and then we take steps to fix it. This has helped where we use to have to wait and see if the tissue turned dark and cold (dusky), before redoing the dissection.
The best thing to remember is an extremities major vein is closest to the skin, with the artery being located behind it. Tourniquets and direct pressure has provided the best way to save lives from boood loss.
Andrew
 

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One year at deer camp I sutured my left hand with boiled thread from a military sewing kit. It was then soaked in a shot of a friends 100 dollar tequila. The good news was it stopped the bleeding of a bad laceration and a 120 mile trip to the nearest trauma center. The bad news my brother blew chunks and passed out watching, in my camper. LOL I love old deer camp stories
 
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