Marlin Firearms Forum banner

1 - 20 of 61 Posts

·
Banned
Joined
·
4,647 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Not sure where to put this, so I put it here -

I've found a big gun safe, on sale, but it has an electronic lock. Punch in numbers instead of the regular old style dial type lock.

Looking for opinions about this type of lock, please! My instincts say the old dial is best, but I could buy this thing NOW with my savings - and it's very tempting.

So, what say the brethren about these eee-lectronic, push-button safe locks? Yeah or nay?

And thank you for your input!
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
4,647 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Old dial's are best IMO. Sargent and Greenleaf. Mine came with an electronic keypad but I had a safe locksmith change it out to a dial.
You trade some convenience for reliability.
Thank you!
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
750 Posts
Electronic locks are fine until the unit fails. If that happens you'll have to get someone from the company out or someone that can figure out how to open your safe. UNLESS it has a key backup. Which is what I went with. Even if my keypad fails mine unscrews and there's a special long key that fits in a little slot.
I like the ease of opening and god forbid I need something out of that safe in seconds I can open it that fast. Also mine has the traditional 3 handled wheel to open the lugs. Not an electronic type.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
23,560 Posts
Old dial's are best IMO. Sargent and Greenleaf. Mine came with an electronic keypad but I had a safe locksmith change it out to a dial.
You trade some convenience for reliability.
I agree--while in the Army--the only vault doors I had problems with were the ones with the digital dial locks. The locksmiths loved those digital dials--money in the bank for them when they came to drill out the door frame around the lock.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,239 Posts
I have a dial safe for over 30yrs. not one issue (knock on wood.)

A couple of friends brought a new electronic safe recently on the holiday sale. many safe have gone electronic. If you do go electronic, go with a good brand safe.

from my experience it's easier/quicker to access a electronic safe (a couple push of a button) vs. the dial (pass the # and you'll have to start all over. lol). but I'm still happier with my dial safe.
Electronic it's great when it works. I have heard of some electronic pads going bad, but the company did fix them for free.

I do like electronic in some things, but I don't need it in my safe. I tend to think, the more high-tech it is the more likely it will lead to headaches down the road (that's just me.)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13,445 Posts
Go to YouTube and look up the Lock Picking Lawyer. He has over 1,000 videos posted, and can pretty much get into any lock; manual dial, key, fingerprint, or electronic. He's sure to have info on a safe with electronic lock.

I only have one question. Is there a bypass in the event the electrics fail?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,304 Posts
FLASH BACK: Spring 2016:

I had a electronic combination lock issue with my then ten year old Champion safe. Would not open, even after installing 2 new batteries. Combination was changed once that day safe was installed to a combination I selected.

Called the dealer who advised me to call Champion Safe. After jumping through a few hoops, Champion sent out a loaner key pad. Still did not open.

Dealer representative came out and unsuccessfully tried several Champion provided "master codes" as well as new batteries. He called Champion and again unsuccessfully tried another master code. Dealer rep drilled out the safe door to remove the computer chip, open it up, and install a time-tested S & G dial lock.

Old lock sent back to Champion to test it. Champion found a problem in the computer chip as there was power from the battery/key pad to the computer chip. For someone reason, the computer chip would not accept the combination or the master codes. Learned the difficult way that electronic safe door looks are unreliable and like a home computer, they will fail. All that for a mere US$475.00, tax included.

The Bottom Line: an electronic lock has a small computer chip to operate. Computers fail and it is not if it fails, but when....
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
10,679 Posts
I am not trusting 21st century digital technology that has many weaknesses to open a vault of 19th and 20th century hardware. Lightning, battery failure, EMP, or failed Chinese made chip boards do not give a feel good.

I will say that after 15 years of openeing a safe 2-5 times a week the safe intermittantly failed to open. It is a Seargent & Greenlee. A digital online visit with google explained that mechanical locks wear. The fix is to dial the combo as usual adding or subtracting 1/2 digit of each number.

Works fine now.

AC
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
25,768 Posts
I won't own an digital electronic lock safe nor any cheap safe that doesn't pass a certified pry test. There are too many cheap safes offered that are easily pried open with a crow bar in less than two minutes. You get what you pay for comes to mind. A good safe won't have external hinges, or cheap easily defeated bolts and the safe door seam are tight so that crow bars can't get a good bite.

The following video explains the difference quite well and youtube has many manufacturers pry test results. Just do a pry test search of the safe brand.





Jack
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
25,768 Posts
  • Like
Reactions: MarlinManCB45/70

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
13,921 Posts
I have a dial safe for over 30yrs. not one issue (knock on wood.)

A couple of friends brought a new electronic safe recently on the holiday sale. many safe have gone electronic. If you do go electronic, go with a good brand safe.

from my experience it's easier/quicker to access a electronic safe (a couple push of a button) vs. the dial (pass the # and you'll have to start all over. lol). but I'm still happier with my dial safe.
Electronic it's great when it works. I have heard of some electronic pads going bad, but the company did fix them for free.

I do like electronic in some things, but I don't need it in my safe. I tend to think, the more high-tech it is the more likely it will lead to headaches down the road (that's just me.)

100% Agree.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,867 Posts
Now that is a old but cool safe! Thanks for sharing.



Jack
I Should have been a little more clear. That photo is of a vault door and is still in place in the original position of the original building. It is the Fitger Hotel in Duluth MN. Lots of cool history. Think of all the people and items that past in and out of that vault. Stayed there last week and they let me poke around.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,311 Posts
I have had a cheap Costco safe with the electronic key pad. Maybe 15 years now. Still working OK with battery replaced about three times. It also has a key back-up. A friend had trouble with his own, bigger, safe, also from Costco. Once he eventually managed to grind through and get it open the problem wasn't the electronics after all. A small bolt inside the mechanism loosened up and fell into the gears jamming the whole thing. Could have/would have happened the same with a dial lock. Learning from his experience, first I looked mine over and checked all screws and bolts for tightness. Second, I took various photos of the inside mechanism and figured out WHERE to drill to unlock the door with the least damage, should the lock go bust. Those photos with their explanation are in my OTHER safe. Just for peace of mind.

Luisyamaha
 
1 - 20 of 61 Posts
Top