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Discussion Starter #1
My reloading press is a Lyman multi stage T Press. I wondered what they cost now, so went to find out. The only one I found was online and for sale as 'Vintage'. I bought it new, over 40 years ago. Vintage? I had a very senior moment. (Like when I found a book on snipers in an antiquarian bookshop, written by a friend of mine).

Anyway, it seems to still turn out good reloads, anyone know if I should look at an update, or maybe they just last? Do they wear out and if so, how? I guess if it works, thats good enough.
 

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I had a T press I bought new. I wore the bolt out that turns the torrent, twice! after the second one snapped I could never find another bolt as lyman quit making them. I use RCBS A2 and 2A presses made in the 50s and 60s I also have a pacific that was made in 60s-70s all still work good and will be here working long after I am gone,,,,,,,,,,,,
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I had a T press I bought new. I wore the bolt out that turns the torrent, twice! after the second one snapped I could never find another bolt as lyman quit making them. I use RCBS A2 and 2A presses made in the 50s and 60s I also have a pacific that was made in 60s-70s all still work good and will be here working long after I am gone,,,,,,,,,,,,
Can I ask, I see how if the bolt snapped that would be a clue, but how did you know the bolt was worn out?
 

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I've got one of those orange turret presses, had it for 25 years maybe, still works as good as new.
since getting hornady LNLap i mainly just use it for working up loads and short runs of stuff like 25-35
22 hornet and some others.
 

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I use an old Herters Press. I made a shell holder adapter that takes most of the popular new shell holders.
 

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I use an early 70's vintage RCBS Rockchucker press that I got from an old friend of mine 25 years ago. I also have a 1980's vintage RCBS Rockchucker that I use as well. I have one (the 70's one) set up for large primers, and the other press set up for small primers. No fiddling with the auto primer feed. Also, if something goes wrong during a loading run, I have an extra press to use so I don't have to tear down the one I am loading on.

Hard to beat the RCBS presses.
 

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All kinds. Enamored of their mechanisms!
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I'm using my 1978 Rockchucker. It was starting to look ratty with the 60's 'ish turquoise wrinkle paint coming off. Took it apart and had it black Parkerized by a nearby Mil-Spec plating company with Manganese phosphate. I use it for sizing rifle cases and prepping brass (primer pocket swaging, etc.) and my 1984 Dillon 450 for mass production.The Dillon just seems too flimsy for the heavy sizing chores. The two presses get along well with each other on the bench and know their places.

Kept cleaned and lubed they'll be good to go for another 35-40 years.

AC
 

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Can I ask, I see how if the bolt snapped that would be a clue, but how did you know the bolt was worn out?
well when I say worn out I mean it snapped from fatigue. it happened twice and all at once both times,,,,,,,,,,,,,,
 

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I still have my old Lyman Turret that I bought in the early ‘70’s. My uncle had a Herter’s, that is now my cousins! memtb
 

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I have a Lyman All American turret press from the late 60's or early 70's. I do most of my reloading on a Rockchucker IV, but keep 9 mm or 45 ACP dies set up in the Lyman to do runs of four or five hundred at a time.
 

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I do wonder if the new presses offer any advantages over my old Lyman T press? I don't see how they would?
I see a progressive press as being much faster than a 'T' type press. One has to stroke the press at least 3 times to load one round. A progressive, once it goes around produces one loaded round per stroke. JMHO.

AC
 

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I use 5 Lyman Tru Line Jr's and an All American for 85% of my loading and 310 sets for most of the rest .
 

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Discussion Starter #15
I see a progressive press as being much faster than a 'T' type press. One has to stroke the press at least 3 times to load one round. A progressive, once it goes around produces one loaded round per stroke. JMHO.

AC
Thanks for the suggestion, but I had a look at the prices and think I will stick with my 'vintage' press. I realise its slower but first, I dont reload large amounts and second, I have a real problem replacing things that still work. Thats why I still have not replaced my original Leatherman supertool as bought in the 1980s.
 

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As gunscrewguy said clean and lube is the key to long press life. And Tranter I have also got my original Leatherman Supertool, My 5 kids clubbed together and bought it for me for Christmas, I can still see there smiling faces when I opened it. Now I see their kids smiling faces at Christmas, getting older ain't so bad. Gar.
 
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