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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I had never heard of it before but found out about soaking rusty traps in vinegar.
Did my first batch tonight, pulled them after a bit less than 5 hours.
Blew them off with a pressure washer, turned out pretty good, especially useful for conibears, 110's or 330's.
They come out pretty "silvery", kinda like when they were new.
Will have to see about time required to get the right amount of rust so they are ready to dye.
It seems like this method is pretty good for coilsprings too, really brings rusty springs back to life.
I'm cheap so I used white vinegar(cheapest out there) and I cut the vinegar 50/50 with water, could probably use 1 gal V to 2 gallons of water.
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
UPDATE.
I'm a believer now. You can use 3 to 1 water to V, let it "cook" overnight, or longer if need be, probably even use more water than that ratio.
Pressure washer saves a ton of time/effort.
Just got done dying traps and they turned out pretty dang good, particularly where the flash rust came back.
They should be even better next year.
Might be helpful if yer lookin' at some used traps.
 

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El Kabong
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Got two words for you

Naval Jelly
 

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I use vinegar all the time. there great on new traps . for new traps I degrease the traps with shotgun cleaner( degreaser) then boil traps in 50/50 water and vinegar. let dry for a day, nice coating of rust. then boil them in oat leafs and crush acorns . they become jet black. HAPPY TRAPPING:)
 

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I had never heard of it before but found out about soaking rusty traps in vinegar.
Did my first batch tonight, pulled them after a bit less than 5 hours.
Blew them off with a pressure washer, turned out pretty good, especially useful for conibears, 110's or 330's.
They come out pretty "silvery", kinda like when they were new.
Will have to see about time required to get the right amount of rust so they are ready to dye.
It seems like this method is pretty good for coilsprings too, really brings rusty springs back to life.
I'm cheap so I used white vinegar(cheapest out there) and I cut the vinegar 50/50 with water, could probably use 1 gal V to 2 gallons of water.
Did not know it cleaned rust.But ,I final wash my floors with white vinegar and fresh water a few hrs after grouting and it takes the haze off like magic.I always carry a gallon on the truck.
 

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HEY PARD whats naval jelly:hmmmm:, sounds like something me and a old girl friend used:biggrin:
You are thinking of KY,lol!Naval Jelly is a product that was designed in WWII to remove rust from the bottom of naval ships.It contains phosphoric acid,which is proven to dissolve rust.White vinegar also contain acid ,around 5% acetic acid.Vinegar is allot less toxic than acid.If it does the job I prefer vinegar.Acid is toxic and can be unpleasant to work with.
 

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I've used vinegar before, and it does work on rust.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I use vinegar all the time. there great on new traps . for new traps I degrease the traps with shotgun cleaner( degreaser) then boil traps in 50/50 water and vinegar. let dry for a day, nice coating of rust. then boil them in oat leafs and crush acorns . they become jet black. HAPPY TRAPPING:)
I've used walnuts before, off the ground, was considering acorns now that I live where there are a lot of them around the house.
good to know, will try, tks.
 

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Considering the volume needed vinegar would probably be cheapest. I have always found CLR to be effective for rust. Years ago my sister had a well with lots of iron in the water which would do a job on sinks, toilets, etc. She used navel jelly with good effect although as noted you must be careful with that stuff. :flute:
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Considering the volume needed vinegar would probably be cheapest. I have always found CLR to be effective for rust. Years ago my sister had a well with lots of iron in the water which would do a job on sinks, toilets, etc. She used navel jelly with good effect although as noted you must be careful with that stuff. :flute:
You'll do well Del, you'll do well.
 

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Caveat! Vinegar and gun bluing do not mix. ( Bluing is in fact a form of rust. ) In fact if you ever want to remove the blue from a gun, soak it in vinegar.

D
 

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You are thinking of KY,lol!Naval Jelly is a product that was designed in WWII to remove rust from the bottom of naval ships.It contains phosphoric acid,which is proven to dissolve rust.White vinegar also contain acid ,around 5% acetic acid.Vinegar is allot less toxic than acid.If it does the job I prefer vinegar.Acid is toxic and can be unpleasant to work with.
Yeah. Naval Jelly is more costly and more difficult to use than vinegar.

Phosphoric acid is used in soda pop, too. Think about that next time you reach for a soft drink. (would you drink a bottle of Naval Jelly?)
 

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It's amazing how many uses there are for that stinky liquid. There are books out extolling the many uses for vinegar, even drinking a small amount every day for health benefits. There are lots of books out there on what you can do with it.
I married a Greek and they think it is a miracle liquid - heck, my mother-in-law uses it to clean furniture - scary!:ahhhhh:

Gr8rtst
 
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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
I like learning about old "tried and true" ways of doing things.
Won't be long, and those ways will be lost I'm afraid..........
 
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I like learning about old "tried and true" ways of doing things.
Won't be long, and those ways will be lost I'm afraid..........
Hopefully not. I recall years ago someone sold a book on TV of thousands of "home tips" people could use. As such having these things in print at some point adds to the likelihood that this "folk lore" will remain with us for a while yet and may even make it onto the internet as we have seen here for all to benefit. :tee:
 

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I've used vinegar before, and it does work on rust.
Vinegar will also help neutralized the galvanizing and preps a galvanized metal for painting. Have done this on car restoration
 

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It's amazing how many uses there are for that stinky liquid. There are books out extolling the many uses for vinegar, even drinking a small amount every day for health benefits. There are lots of books out there on what you can do with it.
I married a Greek and they think it is a miracle liquid - heck, my mother-in-law uses it to clean furniture - scary!:ahhhhh:

Gr8rtst
I thought I was alone in that regard. Wife uses vinegar to clean countertops in the bathroom, kitchen and mops floors with it.

I just use it for cucumbers and onions in a big bowl chilled down in the fridge.
 

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I thought I was alone in that regard. Wife uses vinegar to clean countertops in the bathroom, kitchen and mops floors with it.

I just use it for cucumbers and onions in a big bowl chilled down in the fridge.
Mix vinegar and water, and wet newspaper with it and clean windows....works very well
 
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Vinegar will also remove hard water spots off your car paint and windows, sprinkler got my truck at a buddy's house while we were away on a 3 day huntin trip,googled it, vinegar on a wash cloth took it right off.
 
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