Marlin Firearms Forum banner

1 - 20 of 61 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
769 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I know some cannot talk about there time spent in Vietnam. I myself have no problem. I speak of these times for those who cannot. It is good too let people that have the wrong ideas of what really happened over there know the truth.

So......... lets hear some memories

You guys remember the Fuku Lizards LOL.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
9,038 Posts
I enlisted July 10,1972, I did not go to RVN. To all my Brother vet's who did, WELCOME HOME!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,919 Posts
I was there in '66-'67 and I spent most of my time at a place called Khe Sanh. At that time we could not talk about "the war" when we came home so I did'nt. The folks who were in the VA were all WWII guys and they were impossible to deal with. I used every bit of self restraint I had one day when I went to a VA office to check on what I needed to do to get an up-dated DD-214. I was told that I was not in a "real war", I didn't know what combat was and I was nothing but a g.d. hippy trying to scam a freebie off the taxpayers. I never went around the VA until a few years ago when my doctors had me go to be checked for agent orange exposure. At this age and stage in my life I have had time to review past experiences and reflect on the actions of others and it is my opinion that those VA guys who gave me such a hard time were suffering from PTSD, which was unknown in their day. Dosen't excuse how they were but it does explain it. Only in the past few years I have been able to talk about my experiences, not because they were so horrible, but because we were conditioned to keep our mouth shut by the protestors and the general public when we got home. To me, the folks who went to Desert Storm and showed the whole world what the U.S. Military could do vindicated all of us. When I was in Viet Nam myself and every one else were flabergasted at the way the war was conducted. Christmas "truces" when the NVA could re-supply and re-position them selves with NO interference from us, no firing on relegious structures where artillery was hidden, aircraft who had to fly in a combat zone but had to make visiual recoginition of another aircraft before they could fire on it. Every one over there, from Generals to privates all said that if we were allowed to fight the way we were trained with the assets we had on the ground we would have the place cleaned up in two years, max. We spent ten years there and then gave up. We had the North Vietnamese on their knees, ready to quit but some of our politicans told them to hold out for a few more weeks and we would have a new president and we would negotiate with them on their terms. (Socialism started a long time ago in our politics.) The same thing is being done to our troops now as far as fighting in "the sandbox" goes. At least they are shown respect by the public when they come home. This may sound like the ramblings of a crybaby, but I am proud of my time over there with the guys I served with and the things we did and the way we did them. I can now talk objectaively about incidents and happenings but I still hold some things back because they don't need to be talked about. If I were fifty years younger and fifty pounds lighter, I'd do it all over again.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,167 Posts
I was in Army artillery from mid 69 to mid 70. I was in Viet Nam at the beginning of the end; when I first got into country over 200 Americans were dying a week, when I left it was less than 100. I started out on a firebase on Hwy 19 in between An Khe and Pleiku. I was on the guns for a couple of months and then became a Forward Observer: we were in First Field Forces Group Artillery and the officers stayed on the firebase playing round-robin in the fire direction control bunker so the F.O.'s were all trained enlisted men.

Halfway through my tour the battery was transferred down to Nha Trang to be the "palace guards". By that time Vietnamization was in full swing. One day there was a rocket attack aimed at the air base and fuel dumps; we cranked up the howitzers and started to return fire and, after a very few rounds, were told to "check fire". It seems that the Vietnamese in charge of the Installation Defense Command hadn't give the battery clearance to fire. It was about a week before we were cleared to fire on the point of origin of the rockets. Never knew, except that it gave the NVA/VC time to clear their equipment out of the bunker.

I had a number of friends that had spent time in the jungle, everything from base camp warriors to infantry, we'd get together, drink, smoke dope and talk, so we all had a pretty good idea of what went on, but we were a little reticent about talking to everybody. Nobody I knew ever joined the VFW - the old men didn't want us. My son is in the Air Force, he did some time in both Afghanistan and Iraq. We were in a Home Depot down in NJ and the clerk noticed his ID card and said that he had a 10% discount - huh, nobody ever gave me a 10% discount (except the airlines, who gave me 50% if I flew standby in uniform). Although, last Veterans Day Home Depot & Lowes were giving 10% to all veterans, I just needed to bring my DD-214. Maybe some of the country is feeling a little guilty.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
11,750 Posts
Thank you all for your service. I was blessed in being a little younger and not graduating high school until 1976. I have two older sisters and of course many of their friends and my brother-in-law served in Vietnam. It has been a long time now but it was on the news and in the news everyday for the first 15 years or so of my life. Bless the families that sent their kids over there for this country. As I father I can't imagine what it most have felt like.

Vietnam Veterans Memorial Wall - The Virtual Wall (TM)
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
349 Posts
Thank you all for your service...it is an honor to listen to your stories and learn what you have to say...thank you
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
712 Posts
Wow, brings back some memories never talked about. I got there in 1971 when units were starting to stand down and go home. I served with an Assault Helicopter Co. in Chu Lai then the 7/1 Air Cav Squadron in Vihn Long in the delta, 2 extremes in terrain for sure. We sure could have won the war given the chance but hard to do when told not to return fire when fired upon. I remember coming home and taking off my uniform in the bathroom of the airport as soon as we landed so I didn't get pointed at as baby killer as I had on the Americal Division patch. I am glad that most of our Veterans from Iraq and Afganistan? are getting the recognition they deserve and I thank them and all that came before them for my freedom.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,912 Posts
God Bless You for your service back then.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
700 Posts
I went in with the advance party of the 173d Airborne Brigade off Okinawa early May 1965 and ended my third tour in Oct 1971. Returned thru San Francisco after the first tour and harmed two hippys who spat at me in the SF airport. Cop hid me out until flight time so I wouldn't get arrested for seriously damaging the one dumb ass - never start a fight with a real paratrooper unless you are ready to get seriously injured or dead. I had been out of the weeds about 48 hours and these guys attack me - stupid. The war was a total screw up from day one. North Vietnam was attacking South Vietnam. So instead of us denying the north security of its homeland, we went to the South and let them whack at us at their leisure. Figure out how well that would have worked with Germany and Japan in WWII ! Haiphong Harbor was not mined/blockaded until very near the end. Our Navy was required to watch war supplies from Russia and elsewhere sail by on the way into the North's only real harbor. Why wasn't Hanoi demolished like Berlin and Japanese cities? What the hell were Pres Johnson and Nixon thinking? We never lost a battle against the N. Vietnamese forces, their vaunted Tet Offensive was an unmitigated disaster for the VC and the NVA but they were allowed to go into Cambodia, Laos and N. Vietnam to lick their wounds, refit and come back again. Why? The US was drafting our young men to fight in the South Vietnam. The resources to fight were all coming from the US but the S. Vietnamese units were never put under a unified command structure as was done in WWII and Korea, and the South did not fully mobilize it's manpower to fight. (Their draft was nothing like ours). We were not allowed to use the US Army Reserves or the National Guard in significant numbers to flesh out the manpower and especially the leadership ranks of officer and NCOs. We had to use drafted "shake and bake" NCOs and OCS officers (again from the same draft pool for the most part). We totally watered down the leadership of the Army all the way through the war. Even the US command structure in Vietnam was totally screwed up with MACV responsible for some things and USARV responsible for others so that a unit had to satisfy the requirements of both. Plus we couldn't fire until some dufus Vietnamese province commander could be found to authorize use of firepower. Over the three tours I served as an Infantry platoon leader, company commander and on a Corps General staff. We were at all levels frustrated with the stupidity of command structure and with the political gutlessness of our elected officials. Last straw was Sec Defense McNamara writing a book long after the war admitting he was all wrong - thanks a helluva lot A-hole! Several of my best friends' widows really needed to hear that plus the families of about 50,000 more young men with names on the black wall. And I want to thank all the protesters who so vigorously support the anti war movement. Despite all the dumb leadership acts we still really had pounded the N. Vietnamese to their knees but you lifted their spirits and can consider yourselves responsible for at least 50% of the US casualties by helping the enemy string out the negotiations for at least half of the war. If I were among you I would not be able to look myself in the mirror ever. Oh, I am considering renting a tanker truck to send it around the country to gather urine from all the vets who wish to contribute. One of these days Jane Fonda will die and the truck will be emptied on her grave, or sprayed over where ever her ashes are scattered. Should have been hung for Treason!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
67 Posts
Enlisted the Jan. before Saigon fell, the Drill Sgt's had us all pumped up about going back as our govt. had promised the South help should things go to hell. Well they did go to hell and our congress said no as to going back. I am a Nam Era Vet and I am proud to say that the finest bunch of NCO's I had the honor of serving with were Viet Nam Vets! Welcome home to all of you who were there. I do not know if it is still the case but at one time there were more people claiming to be VN vets than there were vets who had served in VN.

DSCN2234.JPG
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
24,974 Posts
I was very lucky to have been trained by several Vietnam Vet NCOs during my first tour in West Germany (1984-1988) as a Field Artillery soldier. Those lessons served me well during Kosovo (1999) and Iraq/Afghanistan (2002-2004). Even as I type this as a defense contractor deployed to Afghanistan--I still use some of those skills today--paying attention to detail and staying alive! I offer thanks to ALL of you Vietnam Vets--don't care what anybody said about you back in the day--YOU GUYS/GALS ARE THE BEST!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,024 Posts
I graduated high school in 1974 and never served in any branch service. I was one of the fortunate ones a farmers only son. I am proud to know those who served in those days and could never understand why anyone could turn their nose up at any vet. unless they were one of the braggard's that claimed to be in action over there. In my youth you could easily tell the ones who actually served over there from one who didn't. The ones that talked about being there where liars and the one who didn't where really there. I am proud to be an American now days only because of those who protected me while at home enjoying my youth.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,742 Posts
Of Sweat and Blood USMC 1969.jpg MPC Vietnam 1969.jpg MPC Vietnam 1969 Back.jpg

A few memories from RVN. The MPC was used instead of greenback for in-country troops. Periodically the currency would be changed leaving the local Vietnamese with a load of useless bills.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
505 Posts
I am a Vietnam era Veteran 1964-1967, however I did not serve in Vietnam, I served in North East Africa.

I would just like to say that I am a proud American that has a very very high respect for those Vets that served in Vietnam.
I have a high respect for all military people serving this great country in the past, today, and in the future.

jic

US Army Aviation 1964-1967
 
1 - 20 of 61 Posts
Top