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Just got back from my first range trip with my new 1894 csbl.

It shot great. I love it. Smooth action and my difficulty with the stiff magazine/loading gate seems to have worked itself out.

When I went to clean it, I sliced my finger right open on the upper side of the reciever (the upper part just above where the bolt runs parallel to). It was as sharp as a knife.

My question is this:

Can I lightly file it down at all? Or does it need to be exactly flush with the bolt like it came from the factory. The corner of it is literally as sharp as a knife as it is.

Have any of you experienced this issue with any of the other newer stainless steel models?

Thanks!
 

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Just got back from my first range trip with my new 1894 csbl.

It shot great. I love it. Smooth action and my difficulty with the stiff magazine/loading gate seems to have worked itself out.

When I went to clean it, I sliced my finger right open on the upper side of the reciever (the upper part just above where the bolt runs parallel to). It was as sharp as a knife.

My question is this:

Can I lightly file it down at all? Or does it need to be exactly flush with the bolt like it came from the factory. The corner of it is literally as sharp as a knife as it is.

Have any of you experienced this issue with any of the other newer stainless steel models?

Thanks!
Cwenk,

Congrats on a 1894 that seems to be working out of the box. You are experiencing what I call, CNC Fresh, parts.

You are on the right track. You just need to add a little finish work no longer furnished by the Mfg. I would recommend a small triange or square arkansas stone to lightly work the sharp edges your hands will come in contact with. The back of the bolt and the inside edge of the feeding gate are two other areas that can cause you to leak blood on your new rifle. A file is more than you need to dull the edge.
 

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If you do the penny trick it's best to use one minted before 1982. They have a higher copper content than the newer ones which make them softer and easier on the guns finish. I think I have about 20 of the older ones for just that purpose.
 

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There is a tool made for burnishing sharp edges. It is about the size of a ball point pen with a tungsten carbide piece used to burnish the sharp edges of metal objects after cutting them. I think you would ask for a "de-burring" tool when shopping. I used one on a marlin. There is a razor sharp edge at the bottom of the receiver when you remove the bottom plate. Watch out for that one, it can lay you open good.
 

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The hammer on my 1894CSBL has really sharp edges, too. It's actually bitten me a couple of times just running the lever quickly.
 
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