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I am planning on using my new 336W this year for elk hunting. Any recommendations on factory ammo? Righ now my plans are to use the remington core-lokt 170 grain. Anybody else out there on this site bag an elk or even a moose with a 30-30? Please post ammo you used. Also if you know a site that has pics of some game recovered 30-30 bullets, please post.
 

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A decade or so ago my grandson took a large cow on a youth hunt with a 30/30 170 grain gas checked Lee bullet that I cast with wheel weight alloy using a Savage 340 bolt action. Just over 50 yards and dropped where she was standing. Bullet was not recovered.

Range you are going to encounter will influence the cartridge you should use, but bullet placement is always the key! I would not recommend using a 30/30 for a larger bull with the ranges they are usually shot here now.
 

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In Alaska, moose are routinely taken by .30-30 factory loads. Ranges are usually short (under 75yds or so). Alaskan moose are massive (up to 1550lbs) but not terribly "tough" to kill and they generally don't take off after the first hit like a whitetail.

Even though I'd prefer a .45-70...

If I took my Savage 1899H (which is disgustingly accurate) and loaded it with factory Federal 170gr Nosler Partition loads featuring (about $35/box), I would have few qualms about going after elk at short ranges.

BUT...I would pick my shot and stay under 75yds.

Mario
 

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If you are going to spend that much money for license and tag plus camping etc. etc. etc. Take a gun that give you a chance not just a hope and a prayer.

"fk"
 

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Like others said, watch your range and keep it close. 30-30 will kill an elk but you are limiting your effective range in comparison to most other high powered rifles. What terrain are you going to hunt would be the deciding factor for what to use but if using the 30-30 I would stick with a 170 grain bullet and be very good at bullet placement like Tom in Arizona said.
 

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I've shot a few elk with my 336c over the years. I used Remington's 170 grain Core Lockt factory fodder on all of them. They didn't exactly get up and moan and whine about getting killed with something other than a 7mm, .300, or .338 Magnum. Some died on the spot. A few trotted off 50 yards or so , wobbly-like, and then collapsed.

There is more to teminal ballistics than foot pounds of energy. The .30-30 doesn't start off with a surplus of that to begin with and sheds it fairly quick due to the round nosed bullets typically used. Yet, in my experience using it over the years, it kills a lot better than a ballistic chart would have you believe it would.

Velocity is squared in energy calculations and the .30-30 isn't a high velocity round in the modern sense, but in spite of this, it'll dig in deep, making long straight wound channels that pierce vitals and take them out of commission. Think about the old Kynoch .275 Rigby / 7mm Mauser loads used in Africa back in the day -there, you had a 175 grain round nosed soft or solid bullet leaving the muzzle around 2,300 ft/s and that loading was renowned for deep digging penetration. Or, think about the old 6.5mm Mannlicher Schoenaur which definitely wasn't a powerhouse round but accounted for plenty of critters much more bulletproof than our elk are, back in its day.

The .30-30 kills better than paper ballistics would have you believe for the same reason that the old 7mm Mauser and 6.5 mm Mannlicher do and did. A bullet with relatively high sectional density at modest impact velocity is a sure recipie for straight, deep-digging penetration.

Keep the range reasonable, and the .30-30 will quickly kill an elk as dead as they can be killed.

T-C
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I live here in Colorado and the area I hunt is mostly timbered. I plan o keeping my shot distance less than 100yards, and it would be more like 50-75yards max. Thanks, now anyone know any good sites that show recovered 30-30 bullets from game?
 

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[quote="fk" ]
If you are going to spend that much money for license and tag plus camping etc. etc. etc. Take a gun that give you a change not just a hope and a prayer.

"fk"
[/quote]

BIG +1 on that!! :eek:
 

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[quote="fk" ]
If you are going to spend that much money for license and tag plus camping etc. etc. etc. Take a gun that give you a change not just a hope and a prayer.

"fk"
[/quote]

So leave the Marlins home and take a Rem 700 in .338 Mag, then? Or perhaps the .340 Weatherby? Nah, just cut to the chase and take a .375 H&H...cuz them old cartridges in them old leverguns are just ineffective. ::)

There is nothing wrong with his choice as long as he knows it's limitations (and his). Just like anyone that hunts with a bow or traditional muzzleloader.

Mario
 

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30-30's have piled up mountains of game, big and small over the years. I think you will be just fine. Everything I have shot with a 30-30 dropped in sight. I have an old book on Grizzly bear hunting written in the early 1900's. The authur used a 44-40 winchester on his first few bears and killed them with neck shots before switching to a bigger gun. The 30-30 has alot more power than that round.
 

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:-X ;D
 

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[quote="fk" ]
If you are going to spend that much money for license and tag plus camping etc. etc. etc. Take a gun that give you a change not just a hope and a prayer.

"fk"
[/quote]

I once spent a pile of money on license and tag, plus the gas to get me and my nag from California to New Mexico, plus who knows how many other incidental expenses, along with an expenditure of time that I'll never get back, for the privilage of trying to take an elk with a muzzleloader. I went home with no meat and an unfouled bore. That didn't stop me from doing it all over again the following year, when I took an elk at 50 yards with my .50 Lyman Great Plains Rifle shooting a patched round ball. My 336 is a howitzer by comparison, and the enjoyment of doing a successful hunt with a more traditional caplock, patched ball rifle more than made up for getting the skunk the previous season.

If all I were looking for out of my hunting was meat on a pole, the supermarket is just around the corner. The hunt is more than a meat gathering expediition to me, so if I have to pass up on a shot that I could easily make with a different gun, so be it. For me, the .30-30 adds more to my hunting experience than it takes away, so the next time I go elk hunting, you can bet that I'll be taking my 336c with me.

T-C
 

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I agree with this "What terrain are you going to hunt would be the deciding factor" mainly due to the possibility of a long range shot, not because a 30-30 won't kill an Elk at 200 yards, because it will with Leverevolution without a doubt. Another caliber might be the edge you need trajectory wise for that 350 yard shot.
 

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30-30 will and has killed everything in North America.. use it and don't look back... 170's Rems or Winnys will do it .. Leverevloution will also..
 

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I've mentioned before that I've got a relative who took elk regularly with his .30-30 Win 94 & iron sights. I believe he told me that he shot them all at 60 yards or less, and he had no problems filling the freezer. He had a real sweet deal, living in an orchard, where the elk would come to feed. Believe he shot most, or all, of them from the single-wide he was living in at the time.

He didn't bother keeping bullets, just meat.

When I went, hoping for a big bull up in the Wind River Mtns, I took a scoped 7mm mag with 175 gr Partitions. No recovered bullet there, just antlers & meat!
 
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