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Discussion Starter #1
I've posted quite a bit here on Marlin Owners about my two model 39s.

About how I just love 'em, and how much I enjoy shooting them, and how accurate they are, and how reliable they are, and how they feel like old friends to me, and Yada Yada, and on and on.

Well, tonight I'm going to say something different.

I bet most of you don't even know I have a model 60.

It's a newer model, probably 2005 or so. It has the short barrel and magazine, the last shot bolt hold open, and the subtle laminated stock.

I've fitted it with a Mueller 4.5-14X40 AO scope. They call it the "All Purpose Variable", or APV.

Here's a pic of it from a while back.



I don't brag on this rifle much. Generally, I prefer shooting the lever actions but that's not to say that this rifle is inferior in any way.

It's been 100% reliable since it was new. In fact, I don't ever recall it jamming in any way.

And it's proven it's self to be plenty accurate. It regularly shoots smaller groups than either of my 39s can do on their best day.

It carries and shoulders well, and the laminated stock is pleasant to look at.

The only thing I have ever had to complain about with this rifle is the dreaded scope creep, and that's a pretty small problem and not about the rifle in the first place. It wasn't even an "Every Time" problem. Usually, this rifle would make two or three trips to the range before I would notice that the scope was moving, and it didn't seem to bother the zero when it moved.

I would just loosen the mounts up, slide the scope back where it belonged, and keep on blasting.

I recently installed a one-piece scope mount in an attempt to make it stay put.

It's a Leapers setup with a huge clamp running the whole length of the top of the receiver. It's got three large Allen Bolts holding it, and I was able to seriously bear down on the thing. I put some Lock-Tite on the dovetail of the rifle before I installed the clamp, so it should be "Glued" on there pretty good.

Here's a crappy cellphone pic.



If this setup works as expected, this may well be an excellent little rifle.

I can't wait to get it out and sight it in. ;D
 

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Ah yes my friend, come bask in the warm light. ;D

The Model 60 is indeed an unsung hero. It is a great rifle and one of my favorites of any design (center or rimfire). I've never understood why it doesn't get more widespread respect... :-\ You get a whole lot of rifle for very little money. Maybe that's part of the reason it's an unsung hero. Maybe a lot of folks just can't believe a rifle that costs so little (comparably) can be so good. Whatever the reason, it's too bad because just as you've discovered, they are great guns.

Lots of folks swear by those Leapers so hopefully it serves you well.

I've said many times, there's a reason the Model 60 is the world's most prolific auto-loading .22LR rifle. :)
 

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Clean fingernail polish holds them 3/4 sliders in place too.. LOL
 

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Eli Chaps said:
Ah yes my friend, come bask in the warm light. ;D

The Model 60 is indeed an unsung hero. It is a great rifle and one of my favorites of any design (center or rimfire). I've never understood why it doesn't get more widespread respect... :-\ You get a whole lot of rifle for very little money. Maybe that's part of the reason it's an unsung hero. Maybe a lot of folks just can't believe a rifle that costs so little (comparably) can be so good. Whatever the reason, it's too bad because just as you've discovered, they are great guns.

Lots of folks swear by those Leapers so hopefully it serves you well.

I've said many times, there's a reason the Model 60 is the world's most prolific auto-loading .22LR rifle. :)
Yep, 13 Million sold since 1960...can't be wrong :)

The much-touted 1022 only has 7.5 million sold since 1963...
 

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I've read your posts and I sure didn't know you had a Model 60. It is very obvious that you love your 39's and with good reason. I have an 1984 pre-safety 39A Golden that is pretty special to me but my 1975 Glenfield M60 will make every shooting trip the 39A will this year. Your M60 is a fine looking rifle and the perfect record of no FTF/FTE is something more people should pay attention to. My M60 just needed a good cleaning to eliminate all previous issues and pumps out those bulk Federal bullets like there is no tomorrow.

13 million sold since 1960 ... that is unreal. I have a couple of good shooting 10/22's I like to shoot but I really enjoy the Marlins more. I won't use the "H****" word in your thread but my new one passed up the 10/22's in my popularity contest.

Thank you for sharing FF.

bjm
 

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I will grant you that the model 60 is a very good .22, but there is nothing in the rimfire world that can compare to the 10-22. I daresay that Bill Ruger could not possibly have imagined that a whole industry would develop around customizing parts for his little carbine. I am well aware of the claim that one needs to spend a lot on 10-22 parts to get one to be a good shooter. But, I've had one that was stock except for a $25 trigger job that I used to win a number of pop can shoots. That rifle has been rebuilt with a bull barrel and now resides in a Boyd's thumbhole laminated stock. I think that the plethora of aftermarket parts for the 10-22 rifles is just one heck of a cool way to build a rifle that fits whatever purpose you could imagine for a rimfire rifle. My most recent build consists of a stainless carbine that I fitted with an aluminum bull barrel with a steel liner, a Boyd's thumbhole stock and a Mueller 8.5 - 25 X 44 scope. I am about to install a Volquartsen trigger housing group on it. The result will be one heck of a lightweight, super accurate squirrel, varmint and small game rifle. Not to mention that it will be a pretty neat silhouette rifle.

One of these days, I'd like to order an aftermarket receiver and build a 10-22 on which the only Ruger part will be the magazine.

A large variety of aftermarket parts is just part of the fun of having a 10-22. I don't see how this could be seen as a negative factor. If one would go to the Rimfire Central forum site, one could see pics of the huge variety of custom rifles of all types, from hunting rifles to all out benchrest models, that have started life as simple little Ruger carbines. And, most of the custom modifications, if not all of them, can be done without the aid of a gunsmith. Except for the all out custom benchrest stocks, all one really needs to make a custom 10-22 is a set of screwdrivers and some punches and a brass hammer.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
while I can see how some folks might like a rifle that has to have every part replaced with good parts to get it to shoot, I'm just not a 10-22 fan.

Here's a full magazine from my model 60, fired at 50 yards.

Purchase price of rifle: $135 plus tax at Academy.

Modifications: Zero.

Extra Parts bought to rectify problems in original rifle's design or construction: Zero.

15 shot one hole groups: Priceless!



Sorry about the fuzzy cell phone pic, but you get the point.
 

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You're not alone Frank. Our friend Brian is of the finest sort he's just not realized the beauty of the Model 60 yet. ;D

Frank, you seem to enjoy writing and I reckon more than a few folks would like to see a review on that Leapers mount, how's about giving it a whirl? We have a Product Review forum here that is always looking for more good objective input. Here's a link to the "rules" for the forum" http://www.marlinowners.com/forums/index.php/topic,78527.0.html

It doesn't have to be long just pertinent. Pros and cons are welcomed as are pics and links to vendors.

Whaddya say? No worries if not. :)
 

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I am going to get a model 60 someday in stainless. I have shot friends model 60s and they are accurate, dependable and never heard bad about them. Walmart has a stainless with a birch stock that looks like it would be a good one for 285.00. Is that a good price?

I did have a 10-22 back in 1973 and it was the worst gun I ever owned. I must have got a lemon cause it was a terrible shooter and very bad about jamming, and it was unsafe at that. It would fire without pulling the trigger just by bumping it. I got rid of it and only to happy to.
 

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I have both a Ruger 10-22 and a Marlin model 60, both shoot very well and the 10-22 that I have I modified by changing the stock, but it shoots just as well with the original. I guess I modified both by putting a scope on both of them.

It was a very windy day the day these two rifle were fire at the targets under each.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Eli Chaps said:
I reckon more than a few folks would like to see a review on that Leapers mount.
Whaddya say?
I might be willing to write it up, but I feel like I really ought to shoot it a little first.

There's a set screw in the top, and I'm supposed to drill a receiver hole in the top of the rifle for that screw.

With it fixed in place that way, it will surely stay put.

I'm gambling on it staying put with just the clamp. Drilling a hole in the top of the rifle is an "Only If I Must" sort of thing.

Let me experiment with it a little, and I'll keep you guys informed.
 

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Fast Frank said:
The only thing I have ever had to complain about with this rifle is the dreaded scope creep, and that's a pretty small problem and not about the rifle in the first place. It wasn't even an "Every Time" problem. Usually, this rifle would make two or three trips to the range before I would notice that the scope was moving, and it didn't seem to bother the zero when it moved.
Just a quick note on the easy way to prevent sight / scope creep. Simply put loctite where the grips grab the rail. Have done this with both Tech sights and a scope on a 795 and a 60. Never had a creep problem. With the blue loctite, you can still remove it and the force required is not enough to damage anything. But it takes enough force you can be sure it won't move on it's own.
 

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If it's a .22 and works the way it should they are all my heroes. I have to date built and given away more youth oriented .22s than I'd ever need in my lifetime. I do like making them so our future generations will have that experience.

My last model 60 required a good soaking in solvent about every 50 rds until it got broke in. I would usually start jamming before and only required a squirt of WD or some such until I could clean it up.

If you own a .22 you should have a soak tank that fits the guns metal workings.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
If you own a .22 you should have a soak tank that fits the guns metal workings.
Interesting observation, Swany.

Being a mechanic by trade, I have access to a parts washing vat at work.

It's basically a big sink that recirculates a light mineral solvent with a pump.

The solvent in there cleans .22 goo just fine, and doesn't hurt the blue or any plastic parts.

I can pull the action off the bottom of the receiver, wash it, blow it dry with my air hose, rinse out the receiver and bolt, lightly lube a few choice places, and have it back together in just a few minutes.

Because it's so easy to do, I clean my .22s every time i shoot them.

Generally, I leave the bore alone unless accuracy starts getting weird.

I think the fact that my model 60 is kept clean has helped it be so reliable.
 
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