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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Heard this mentioned several times but I'm not familiar with it. Pictures often make things easy but, short of that, would somebody who has a knack with words please describe the process?
 

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It works on my 1895 but not on my 336.

I take my finger (always get pinched on the first one) and push the gate all the way open with it and a round will pop out of the tube, I then can use the round in place of my finger. I'm not good at this yet and like I said, I can push on the gate all day with the 336 and it don't happen with that one. I'm used to putting my thumb between the hammer and receiver and levering them out.
 
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I just put on the CBS and rack em out.. :lol:

My luck trying the loading gate thing will get one smacked in the kisser. :D
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks. I didn't think it was anything complicated but could not get shells to pop out into the gate from the magazine so thought maybe there was some small detail I was not getting.

Swany,
Good video. My 1894 FG still won't unload into the gate using the technique on the video. I did discover, though, that if I hold the gate down with a finger of my left hand wrapped around the bottom of the receiver as shown, I can get the last cartridge in the magazine to pop loose and up into the loading gate if I give it a quick push forward with another finger. It seems that the edge of the cartridge rim stays held against the front edge of the gate no matter how hard I push the gate down, but relieving the magazine spring tension on the cartridge frees it and allows it to come back out the way it went in. I'd bet that, with enough careful examination, a fellow could determine what part of the front edge of the loading gate was holding the cartridge and could relieve that edge with a dremel tool. Of course that would require some re-blueing. I'm not sure it's worth the effort. Maybe someday when I'm desparate for something to do......
 

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I'm with Gunjunkie on this issue. That CBS is always on as "insurance" when I operate the lever to unload. Using the loading gate is some new form of mis-use of the loading gate and will eventuall take its toll on the leaf spring that maintains the tension.

Why would anyone have a NEED to unload in that manner?
 

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I use the tip of a bullet to depress the loading gate as you need to get the base of the one in the tube on top of the gate from that point they push themselves out just hold on to the one coming out so the base of the next one is on top. I do this with my 450 all the time. Have not tried it with any of the others.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Buckskinner,
I don't know about any actual NEED. Personally, I've been carefully running them through the action and doing fine, with due care, and the rifles with CBSs definitely help with the safety issue. The idea of being able to remove rounds from the magazine without first setting them up in the chamber with a cocked hammer behind the firing pin has some appeal. I can recall, through the years, hearing about many accidental discharges occurring at loading/unloading of leverguns. Many of those go back to pre-safety days and one can always say that, without sloppy gun handling, they would never have occurred in the first place. This was just a technique that I heard about for the first time and I wanted to fully understand how it worked before passing judgement. No endorsement of the technique by gun manufacturers gives one pause, too.

Your thoughts about wear and tear on the loading gate spring make sense and bear consideration.
 

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My comments were only meant to be "thought provoking" aimed at young or new hunters who favor the LAR. Personally, I have no problem with the technique, but do have concerns about breaking the leaf spring through over-use.

My 1894 holds 13 rounds and the idea of a faster un-loading technique such as this one does have a certain amount of appeal to it, but I rarely load more than 3 or 4 cartridges for 99% of the reasons that I use this rifle. In a situation that required that I use my "poor man's assault rifle" for defense, then I will fill her to the brim and worry about the "other" un-loading method! :wink:
 
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Buckskinner said:
I'm with Gunjunkie on this issue. That CBS is always on as "insurance" when I operate the lever to unload. Using the loading gate is some new form of mis-use of the loading gate and will eventuall take its toll on the leaf spring that maintains the tension.

Why would anyone have a NEED to unload in that manner?
COMPLETE BULL ****.

Unloading through the loading gate takes some getting used to - there is a learning curve there; once learned, is much better and safer than working the action to unload.

Just did a search - the link above shows how it is done . . . .

http://kotisivu.mtv3.fi/boolitcorner/loadunload.avi

I'm not as skilled as Finn, but with some practice, we all should learn this technique.

Went back and looked at this in slow motion, frame by frame, he uses his middle finger to push back the cartridge a bit, while pressing the gate down, just gets the cartridge over the lip.

His Marlin looks to be a custom rifle - note how the lever is dehorned and the finish looks to be epoxy - it ain't no factory Marlin.
 

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Have been un loading both my Marlins and my Winchesters by this method since the 1950's, and most of my Marlins are 1893's and 1894's manufactured in the 1890's, all have the original loading gates, and show no signs of weakening. My newest 1895 was manufactured in 1899. I can see no reason to change my method of un loading at this point in time.

Lee L.
 

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Nanook 450,
I have no concern what-so-ever how you un-load your lever action rifles, or of you're opinion of what I think about it. You belong to a group of "thinkers" that have it all figured out....Do not fail to enlighten US when ever you feel it necessary.

And the next time you see the word, "bull-****"? don't be too surprised if its aimed at you.
 

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BY THE WAY,
Lever action rifles have been around for well over 100 years, and suddenly, all you "intelligent" thinkers have discovered something about using one that no body else did? I have been around for 49 years and the majority of that time has been spent learning to shoot and learning to handle weapons. During that time, It had never been suggested that anyone un-load thier lever action rifle through the loading port. I geuss that you have it all figured out?

I have not looked at the "new" way of un-loading a lever action rifle that you posted as a web site. Some of us were smart enough to figure that crap out long ago and see the that if it were a viable and intelligent alternative, the gun manufacturers would have it listed in the OWNERS MANUAL that they provide with new guns. Obviously though, there are a bunch of you out there that are smarter and better schooled.
 
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Buckskinner said:
BY THE WAY,
Lever action rifles have been around for well over 100 years, and suddenly, all you "intelligent" thinkers have discovered something about using one that no body else did? I have been around for 49 years and the majority of that time has been spent learning to shoot and learning to handle weapons. During that time, It had never been suggested that anyone un-load thier lever action rifle through the loading port. I geuss that you have it all figured out?

I have not looked at the "new" way of un-loading a lever action rifle that you posted as a web site. Some of us were smart enough to figure that crap out long ago and see the that if it were a viable and intelligent alternative, the gun manufacturers would have it listed in the OWNERS MANUAL that they provide with new guns. Obviously though, there are a bunch of you out there that are smarter and better schooled.
Well, double BULL **** - what a ridiculous dude - you are two (2) years older than I am - I started shooting a lever at age 9. You might learn something new? Man, must be tough - again, unloading through the gate is faster, safer, smoother, smarter and easier than working the lever.

Did you watch the video buckskinny? Afraid to admit you could learn something?
 
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M1894 said:
Have been un loading both my Marlins and my Winchesters by this method since the 1950's, and most of my Marlins are 1893's and 1894's manufactured in the 1890's, all have the original loading gates, and show no signs of weakening. My newest 1895 was manufactured in 1899. I can see no reason to change my method of un loading at this point in time.

Lee L.
Respond to this Buckskinner . . . whoever taught you, did not teach you everything . . . you are here to learn - you have your dumb way to unload, this is a smarter way. No, not somthing learned in college. Best way to unload at the range or in the field.
 

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Hey, Guys quit turning your charms up, before Larry closes the thread. I'm 58 and just learned this technique last year, been hunting with levers for a long spell, and it don't hurt to pass this little jewel to anyone that wants to use it. Since I learned it, I've taught everyone I know the method, some like it some don't.
 
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For some reason, I got this notice via e-mail.

Been a year - still think that unloading through the gate is better practice that racking the lever.
 

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I don't see what all the fuss is about and I won't mention my age. :oops: I have used both ways and prefer the loading gate to flippin them all over the bed or catching them one at a time.I just push down with my thumb and they pop out one at a time.

No biggie boys,both ways get your rifle un-loaded,I just prefer one way and others prefer another.

Dang some of you are "OLD"..

Jayco :lol:
 
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