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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm into about my 4 month of reloading, learning alot. I think I
have figured something out concerning max velocity tables...

According to Hornady, the max allowable loads for their 170 grn
bullets is 28.5 grns IMR 3031. In reading info on this forum I have learned
that is at the low end for most reloaders. I myself found
the best load to be 29.5 grns of IMR 3031. I want to be safe as possible
but this load shows No pressure signs in either my 336 or 94's

in reading the Hornady tables I noticed that their test barrel is of
the 24 inch variety. Is this the reason why their max listed load
is 28.5 grns?? my 20 inch barrels don't allow me to reach the velocities
or pressure as a 24 inch barrel does, Am I right in this thinking?
 

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bytor
What is the caliber?? :roll:

D.D.444
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
OH shoot, sorry 30-30 is the caliber
 

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bytor

the speer reloading manual #13 list the IMR 3031 at the minium charge of 25.5 and maximum load at 29.5 for the 170 gr. bullet.
So your load should be safe but it is a maximum load ..And I wouldn't want to go any higher with it. At the least you could lose a good gun and at the worst you could die.With that said...
They used a 20 inch test barrel with a 1 in 12 twist
And they listed that your loads veloicty at 1975 fps. But every rifle is different And yes barrel lenght does effect velocity.I hope this helps you out.

D.D.444
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
thanks for the info Deerdown. I don't plan on goin up on
that load. it is accurate, and should be effective on deer
at ranges up to 125 yards.
 

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The .30-30 is a mid-pressure round. Do not look for the classic pressure signs like flattened primers, and hard extraction. I don't see pressure signs in my .338 Win Mag which runs at 54,000 CUP, which is way beyond what your lever gun should be run at. The .30-30 has been doing the job for over 100 years and with today's better bullets and powders there is no reason to push the limits.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Hi round slammer, I agree with ya, I am just wondering if, when
hornady prints their max loads, is it due to their 24" barell they
used for testing.
 

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The length of the barrel has no effect on how much pressure the cartridge and gun can handle. Pressure signs include the sound of the gun and the fact that the bullet exits the barrel so you are "reading" some pressure signs. What is difficult is reading the maximum allowable pressures for the gun and cartridge you are using. It is difficult, if even reliable, even for very experienced reloaders. I would definitely not recommend going over the published maximums for a particular bullet. Once you are familiar with and comfortable with all the factors involved in assembling your components exactly as shown in tested loads you may be able to make minor changes to more closely replicate the published results. You have good questions - no sense in making some of the same foolish mistakes others have survived if they are lucky.

BTW, I would not use a maximum published load assuming it is "low" since you see many on the 'net who consider a certain load as a starting load. (There surely must be angels as only angels dare to tread where some fo.....lks go.) A chronograph does seem to have some closely correlating data to help you push to the maximums if you use it with and in alignment with the factors detailed in published data (identical components, overall length, type or weapon, etc.) You really need to learn these details and become comfortable with them before you start making variances.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I know what you mean Golsovia

But on this and other forums, 99% of the guys list their 30-30
reloads for 170 grn between 30 to 32 grns of IMR 3031.

aparently that was the standard in the Hornady manual for years
up until recently. If memory serves me, I read on the forum a
few months ago, that Hornady dropped it down to 28.5 grn 3031
about 4 years ago... no one has explained why. I am perfectly
content with 29.5 grns of 3031. It met my liking when my son
took down a 250 lb black bear last month at 60 yards. No need
for me to take it up any more. may even it out to 29grns. see how
it shoots.
 

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Like everything in this world companies are bought and sold, and sometimes the composition of a powder is changed as well. I do not know if that is the case with this powder, but you may want to find out if there were changes before you load based on an older manual. I mention this as the issue of pressure can change significantly with small changes in the powder.

Does anyone know if that may have happened with IMR 3031 or is it just someone reducing the max on advise of their lawyer/technical staff.
 

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Some loads came from when we went to school, we didn't take history because there wasn't any. It was found that the copper sleeve crush method missed some pressure spikes. The pressure data now is far more accurate than in the past. Also I have seen a lot of data that included the statement about the loads not being pressure tested, but were safe in the test rifle. I have a Hodgdon manual that lists 76 grains as max with one of their powders when used with a popular bullet weight. They now list a maximum of several grains less. It is not just lawyers, but new test results that bring down some of what we used to do.
 
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