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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I loaded 10 110 gr Sierra Varminter rounds for my 30/30 with IMR 4895 powder at 34.6 grains. I'll try and send them down range on Saturday. I will only load one in the chamber and one in the magazine.

Any ways, here are my questions.

1. I put a little bit of lube on the outside of the case and also used the brush included in my kit to put some inside the neck where the bullet would seat per instructions that came with the RCBS kit. When I was spot checking my powder loads, I found that there was quite a bit of powder (10-20 granules) that would stick in the neck when I was dumping it into my scale. After messing with that once or twice, I decided to use a napkin and clear out what I think was excess lube in the rest of the cases. From that point on, I only had 5-10 granules that had to be tapped out.

I am thinking I got a little generous with the lube...does that sound correct? The bullets seated fine during the rest of the process.

2. When I stand my rounds up on the table, I noticed that the primers do not go in perfectly flush with the case (They are CCI primers in new Remington cases). The lighting has to be just right...but they look like they stick out about the thickness of a piece of paper. I only noticed it because they wobble slightly when set on a flat surface. I noticed that the primers on the Hornady FTX rounds from the factory are actually in further than the end of the case...which made me wonder about my loads.

I tried to get some snapshots, but they turned out useless. Perhaps I'll try again later with a better camera.

Any causes for concern o wise-ones?
Thanks for any tips!
 

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need to seat primers square (flush). Are you seating with press or hand primer? No real need to ever lube inside of neck, but, if you feel that you must...then use a (dry) lube graphite/mica or use Hornady "one-shot" spray case lube. Will not contaminate powder or primers.
 

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1 big hole said:
need to seat primers square (flush). Are you seating with press or hand primer? No real need to ever lube inside of neck, but, if you feel that you must...then use a (dry) lube graphite/mica or use Hornady "one-shot" spray case lube. Will not contaminate powder or primers.
What he said. Seat the primers flush, and skip the lube. It's not needed.
 

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You made 2 good observations.

On the lube, the excess inside the neck isn't dangerous but it's best for consistency's sake to at least wipe it out - when I use lube inside the neck, and I usually do so only when I neck brass up to a larger caliber, like 260 Remington or 308 Winchester to 358 Winchester or 30'06 to 35 Whelen, I wipe it out. If you'll keep a bore cleaning tip with a clean dry cotton patch on the bench as you load you can get nearly all the lube out with a quick turn of the wrist. If you are having trouble getting a bullet started in the cases, then you're not getting the neck expander quite deep enough into the neck. Also, a light chamfer of the case mouth usually eliminates problems with flat base bullets and new brass.

Your primers are too high, but don't try to fix them now - pushing live primers deeper into loaded rounds is just asking for trouble. Your primers should seat deep enough that a gentle fingertip across the top should feel that they are level with or slightly below flush withg the primer pocket edge. Your rounds should be fine single-loaded; I would close the bolt slowly and gently for any rounds with the high primer. High primers are just plain dangerous with semi-auto weapons, but with a lever or bolt you control the bolt's close.

Does that help?
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks for the info guys...I think I will have to really "lean into" the primer loading stage with my Lee Turret press.
The primer gets pressed in on an "up-stroke" on this press...and I thought I was giving it enough pressure...but probably not.

I am really happy with the way the factory crimp die slightly tightened the case around the bullet. I could barely notice a change from the seating die and the factory crimp die. The bullet is very secure though...I tried twisting it...pulling etc by hand and nothing gives.

I am going to press in some more primers and check back shortly.
 

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biku324 said:
...I wipe it out. If you'll keep a bore cleaning tip with a clean dry cotton patch on the bench as you load you can get nearly all the lube out with a quick turn of the wrist.
They also make what is called a 'bore mop,' essentially a patched up bore tip, in various calibers. I would think it would screw into a brush handle, too, and might be easier to use.
 

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deltaecho said:
I am going to press in some more primers and check back shortly.
I never really liked my press-mounted primer mech on my RCBS, it was difficult to really tell what was going on, and the leverage was such that you could really smoosh a primer.

Although I'm not a big Lee fan, I do have a Lee hand primer and it works wonderfully (in fact, I used it last night capping 500 7.62mm cases while watching Blackbeard's Ghost with the family... but I digress... ) It's not very expensive, but you will have to buy specific Lee shellholders to use in the hand primer.
 

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I haven't used the on-press priming tool on the Lee press in some time, but i do remember that it gave a good "feel" when you seat the primers. Don't worry about setting them off, they need to be mashed into the pockets without over-doing it.

The FCD is good for bullets without a cannelure, but just as good for those with one. It sounds like you have plenty of neck tension to begin with, so it's not actually necessary in your case.
 

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1895Gunner said:
I use my lee hand primer for all primer insertion duties. It does a great job of seating them correctly (assuming you are cleaning primer pockets before re-priming).

Lee Web Site
I agree, in fact, I have two Lee hand primers, one for small primers and one for the large primers. They work better than anything I have tried.
 

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The good news is that CCI primers are usually a little on the hard side...not the hardest ones out there, but not very soft, either. It should be okay for now as long as you figure out how to seat the primers properly in the future, just be gentle with firing them as biku324 suggested...single loading them is definitely a good idea, too, probably don't want to put these things in a tube mag.

Always try for flush or sub-flush primers. You might have some out of spec cases, there, hard to say for sure. If you cannot seat them flush you may want to either try another brand of primer or just throw away the cases. You should be able to feel when they are fully seated, when you have a little experience under your belt.

Like the other guys I use a hand-held primer, I use the RCBS one and it does the job just fine.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
YES!!! ;D I just loaded another primer with the Turret press and this time I made sure that I used good pressure...not cave-man but firm. It is slightly in...just like the factory load.

On the case lube...why does the outside of the case need to be lubed if I am using the Collet die? If I am understanding things correctly...doesn't that only shape the "mouth" of the case?

I'll go back to my reloading book for another pass through.
Thanks again!
 

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I guess we assumed you'd be full length sizing. It's not particularly common to neck size for lever action rifles. But yes, if you're only neck sizing, no need for lube on the body.
 

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I may have missed it but are you loading new brass? Primers should seat nice and smooth. If it's reloaded brass, make sure you dont' have a carbon build up from previous shots. You can get a fancy tool to do it or just use a small flat screwdriver.

For priming, go with a hand primer. I haven't used it but you've got a couple recommendations for Lee. Mine is a Hornady.
You get a better "feel" on if the primer is seated right.
 

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I messed with the Lee Auto-primes for years, but finally gave up on them, the stupid handles kept breaking under my manly grip. I bought a Hornady unit a year ago, and while it has its own idiosyncrasies, it's a lot better. The worst part is having to turn the top around to use large or small primers. That, and it's picky about which brand of shellholders it will use. ::)
 

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papajohn said:
I bought a Hornady unit a year ago, and while it has its own idiosyncrasies, it's a lot better. The worst part is having to turn the top around to use large or small primers. That, and it's picky about which brand of shellholders it will use. ::)
So is my Hornady brass trimmer... :mad:

You really gave up on the Lee hand prime?
 

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I used Lee Auto-primes for twenty plus years, I bet I broke a couple dozen handles, and while Lee always replaced them for free, it wasn't worth the hassles. I broke three in a six-hour span, and I wasn't even even doing anything strenuous with them. I finally gave up, bit the bullet, and bought a Hornady. I think it's a better mousetrap, and gives good feel and leverage. Now I can do a thousand pieces of brass in a sitting and not worry about losing my thumb or getting gashed when the handle breaks.

And no, idiosyncrasies aren't contagious, but they are quirky. 8)
 

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It's the pot metal handles papajohn...I've had one break on me, but dozens...you are manly.
 
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