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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Is it necessary to tumble clean brass after sizing? I'm setting up my Dillon 550 to load 45-70 and if I need to tumble after sizing then it would require a separate priming step. I'll be using One Shot for lube. Do you run into problems if you don't tumble them after sizing? Thanks in advance for your opinion.
 

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I tumble before sizing out of the fear of denting necks if i tumble after sizing

just my opinion
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks for the replies. I think I'll just wipe them off so I can size and prime at the same time. If I were loading on a single stage press this wouldn't be an issue.
 

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Thanks for the replies. I think I'll just wipe them off so I can size and prime at the same time. If I were loading on a single stage press this wouldn't be an issue.
I've done exactly this on mine 550b without any issues.
 

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When the loads are complete, you do want to wipe away any lubricants remaining on the case. A lubed case, does a poor job off gripping the chamber sides when fired and leads to excessive bolt thrust, on levers and other action that lock to the rear, this needs to be kept to a minimum to help avoid excessive case stretching. Completed rounds should not be tumbled or vibra cleaned, done to excess this can lead to break down of the powder grains to literally a powder, which can radically effect the load itself perhaps creating an unsafe condition.
 

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Read what graymustang wrote. Sage advice.

Whether shooting smokeless or Black Powder, I deprime via the sizing die, then wash/tumble the cases-- depending if they are straight or bottle neck -- in ceramic or stainless steel media. Primer pockets are cleaned and all powder residue is removed along with the residual case sizing die lube (either Imperial or RCBS lube from a lube pad).

As an aside, I load my rifle calibers on a Redding turret press; pistol on a Dillon 550B. I do not primer on the Dillon as I had a few high primers that have tied up a revolver. Instead, I rely on the ol' "Tried and True" Lee old-style hand priming tool for rifle and pistol. I can feel when the primer "bottoms out". Priming that way as well as chamfering the inside the case primer flash hole, cutting the primer pocket depth to a uniform depth as well the flash hole diameter have increased the accuracy in my rifles and pistols.
 

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I don't care much for cleaning media outa primer pockets---so rounds that I use carbide dies on--tumble first-then resize & deprime------my 38-55 rounds--not carbide dies must use case lube-----I removed de prime pin from die---lube &resize-----wipe em down w/alcohol-----when dry tumble em---got 2 Lee Turret presses---use Lee universal deprime die----prime em w/ hand primer---then back to normal load sequence------may be little more working but it does good for me!!
 

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I always tumble after I size in corn cob media. I use Lee and Hornady Lube. I also use a single stage press and prime with the handheld primers most times. So, doing it this way is just normal. I hear you on the primer flash holes and clear them when I'm cleaning the primer pockets. It actually goes very quickly and works well and keeps the lube outta my seating dies and chambers where it doesn't belong. God Bless
 

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I tumble to clean my rifle brass before sizing it. Couple of hours or so until I remember that I left the tumbler running...

Then I lube, decap, and size. And depending on how lazy I'm feeling, and how many cases I intend to reload, I'll either wipe down the brass or put it back into the tumbler media to clean off the sizing lube. Takes about 10 minutes. I can do this while I changing the dies over, getting out the powder and bullets, and checking the reloading manual and my records. If your medium is small enough, say Lizard Litter from a pet supply, the granules don't get stuck in the flash holes.

Then recap, drop powder, seat, and crimp.
 
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For myself, the only rifle caliber I load on the Dillon it .223. Those cases get tumbled/cleaned, then FL resized on a single stage press (utilizing RCBS "X" die), then back to dry corncob media cleaning. The cases are checked for proper length, etc. (The RCBS "X" die really limits bottleneck case growth. I have gotten one for EVERY bottleneck case I load for - cause I HATE TRIMMING BRASS.)
I prime on the Dillon, but the 1st station has a universal decapping die - no media in the flash holes!
This way, I've got nice clean cases to load, no sizing lube to be concerned about fouling powder OR primers, AND, when they come off the Dillon - they're ready to shoot!
 

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I usually de-prime and size rifle caliber. just de-prime pistol, then tumble with SS media. This is due to the fact the 30-30/32 special depriming also resize the bullet in one step while case is lubed. Easier to do this upfront and tumble to clean. the primer pockets and inside brass is spotless. I usually check the rifle brass for length and trim after tumbling prior to the reloading step. For the 45 Pistol the brass is sometimes very dirty so I use the lee universal deprime die and tumble these. Then use the carbide re-sizing as one of the 4 steps in the reloading for those. I usually check the rifle brass for length and trim after tumbling prior to the reloading step.

I guess we all have our own processes.
 

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I usually tumble before. Sometimes I'll tumble before resizing and then about an additional hour after brass prep to remove the residue of lube and any brass shavings that may have gotten into the case. If I tumble after, I check the primer pockets and brush the necks again to remove media dust frim inside the case. Tumbling after makes them shiny too.
 

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I'm worse than you folks. I do not reload large volumes anymore. I just run mine through the dishwasher, neck down on the divider posts and call it good after they dry. Very few require additional touch up.

Jack
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I'm worse than you folks. I do not reload large volumes anymore. I just run mine through the dishwasher, neck down on the divider posts and call it good after they dry. Very few require additional touch up.

Jack
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That reminds me of the old days when I loaded shotgun shells really hot and heavy. I'd get one of those mesh net nylon laundry bags with the draw strings. Then I'd load all my hulls up in the bag and tie the drawstring really good. After that, I'd throw them in the washing machine, with a handful of detergent, and put them on regular wash. When done, the bag went into the dryer with the setting for no heat, just cool air, and tumble them for an hour or so. This made some really nice clean shotgun shells ready for reloading.

PS: No dryer sheets were harmed in the making of this post.......:biggrin:
 

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Not necessary, but I do. Brass gets a quick tumble when I get home from the range, just to knock off any dirt or sand that could scratch my dies. After cleaning I size, trim and deburr if needed, then expand the case mouth if I'm going to be loading cast bullets. After all that's done, my brass goes back into the tumbler for the real cleaning. It cleans the brass, removes case lube, smoothes out the case mouth on trimmed cases, and leaves the brass with a protective coating of NuFinish car polish. Priming gets done as a separate step using a Hornady hand priming tool. That way I can prime while sitting with my family in the evening.

papabear, please tell us that you have an old dishwasher mounted out in your garage that never sees anything you eat from. Even if you only shoot fmj ammo, there's toxic lead in the priming compound.
 

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I don't tumble I use a vibratory machine. I run the brass through before any loading steps. Heck sometimes I run them through they after they are loaded.
 
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