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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am relocating to southern Indiana, and, after reviewing the deer hunting regulations I found the following restrictions: a minimum bullet diameter of 0.357 caliber (so far so good), and a maximum case length of 1.80 inches (ahem). I have been looking around the web for some information on trimming .35 Remington brass to meet this standard. I would have to take 12/100ths of an inch off the neck. I've found a few old threads on other forums that suggest there're no problems, that enough neck remains to sufficiently hold the bullet. Surprisingly, however, not one of these threads mentioned the Marlin 336. I am wondering if there would be any feeding issues.

Anyone have any intelligent input on this issue? I would greatly appreciate it.
 

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Sounds strange. Do they want you to use pistol rounds? Not too many rifle cases fit that criteria.

Mark.
 

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I'm not from Indiana, but I was under the impression that the center fire rifle must be chambered in a straight-walled case, not a bottle-necked round like the 35 Remington. Therefore, choices like the 357 magnum, 45 colt, and 44 magnum qualify, but conventional rifle calibers do not.

Perhaps someone from IN will chime in.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
That what they seem to be doing, Oz. I can partly understand the state's position on this as the Midwest is relatively flat and becoming increasingly populated in rural areas, so there's always a chance some stray 7mm Rem Mag could travel do something bad just beyond the tree line. But it's kind of ridiculous at the same time since they have no restrictions on rifles when taking coyotes, feral hogs, or other nuisance animals. I guess that a .25/06 is magically safer when pointed at a coyote than a deer. Also, the state permits modern sabots in shotguns and muzzleloaders, which are on par with the performance of premium .30/30 Winchester ammunition. Strange, but, oh well... just another example of governmental nonsense.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Coss, the guide lists several "examples" of approved cartridges, all of which are straight-walled, but there is nothing in the guide that states bottle-neck cases are not permitted. I wondered the same thing initially, but it is a single paragraph in the guide which I have read about 20x now. Who knows.
 

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I may be wrong, but I seem to remember reading somewhere that they are talking about the normal length of the cartridge in question as opposed to whatever modification you might make to it. Again I may be wrong, but I read that somewhere, possibly on one of these boards, you may want to verify the information.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I guess I'll just have to contact the Indiana DNR... worst case scenario, I have an excuse to by a Marlin 1894!
 
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Thats a pretty dumb law. I don't see why trimming the neck would cause feed issues provided you can get enough bite to crimp the cannelure. You will also need a faster burning powder that uses less volume so as not to cause a pressure spike from the lack of case volume. That LVR powder might be good for that. OR maybe just get a p90 with one of those fishingpole cranks attached to it, that pulls the trigger 3 time per revolution would work. I think it fits the case requirements, but will take a lot of hits to drop anything with it.
 

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I believe the attitude in Indiana is more about the #of people in the woods hunting. Delaware doesn't allow rifles, with the exception of paper cartridge Sharps. I don't think they are aware of just what a paper cartridge Sharps rifle is truly capable of.
 

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I've toyed with the idea also. To the letter of the law it would be ok. But you get that one overzealous possum cop and you could be fighting for your gun back in court just because it says 35rem on the barrel.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Here's the entry in its entirety from the 2011-2012 guide: "Shotguns, handguns, rifles with legal cartridges, muzzleloading long guns, and muzzleloading handguns are legal during this firearm season... Rifles with cartridges that fire a bullet of of .357-inch diameter or larger, have a minimum case length of 1.16 inches, and have a maximum case length of 1.625 inches are legal to use only during the deer firearm season. Some cartridges legal for deer hunting include the .357 Magnum, .38-40 Winchester, .41 Magnum, .41 Special, .44 Magnum, .44 Special, .44-40 Winchester, .45 Colt, .454 Casull, .458 SOCOM, .475 Linebaugh, .480 Ruger, .50 Action Express, and .500 S&W."

And there's this addendum that has just been released for the 2012-2013 deer hunting season: "The maximum rifle cartridge length that can be used in the firearm season has now been extended to 1.8 inches. This means that the .460 S&W, .450 Bushmaster, and .50 Beowulf will be legal to use during the deer firearms season."

...yes, every example they are supplying is a straight-walled case, but is there anything in the text that restricts bottle-neck cases? And by the way, the .450 Bushmaster, .458 SOCOM, and .50 Beowulf are not handgun cartridges.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
I've toyed with the idea also. To the letter of the law it would be ok. But you get that one overzealous possum cop and you could be fighting for your gun back in court just because it says 35rem on the barrel.
Yeah, I thought about that. It's not that I want to challenge the agency by trying to find loopholes... I'd just like to use my 336. But I keep asking myself if this would be more trouble than its worth. I think I would definitely have to save the fired brass and have plenty of handloads on hand as evidence in the event such a "possum cop" was encountered.
 

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Here's the entry in its entirety from the 2011-2012 guide: "Shotguns, handguns, rifles with legal cartridges, muzzleloading long guns, and muzzleloading handguns are legal during this firearm season... Rifles with cartridges that fire a bullet of of .357-inch diameter or larger, have a minimum case length of 1.16 inches, and have a maximum case length of 1.625 inches are legal to use only during the deer firearm season. Some cartridges legal for deer hunting include the .357 Magnum, .38-40 Winchester, .41 Magnum, .41 Special, .44 Magnum, .44 Special, .44-40 Winchester, .45 Colt, .454 Casull, .458 SOCOM, .475 Linebaugh, .480 Ruger, .50 Action Express, and .500 S&W."

And there's this addendum that has just been released for the 2012-2013 deer hunting season: "The maximum rifle cartridge length that can be used in the firearm season has now been extended to 1.8 inches. This means that the .460 S&W, .450 Bushmaster, and .50 Beowulf will be legal to use during the deer firearms season."

...yes, every example they are supplying is a straight-walled case, but is there anything in the text that restricts bottle-neck cases? And by the way, the .450 Bushmaster, .458 SOCOM, and .50 Beowulf are not handgun cartridges.

You could take a 500 S&W and neck it down to 35 cal.and have a snappy little round!!!
 

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This discussion comes up now then about Indiana's hunting laws for rifles that are chambered for pistol cartridge only. The last time a thread like this was posted I looked it up. The law could have charge since then and if I hunt in Indiana I would make it my business to know. Getting back to the 35 Rem. case being trimmed down to 1.880" from 1.920" in my pinion it's still wouldn't make it legal because the rifle's chamber is chambered to fit a 1.920" case and that's what the law will go by. Any game warden that know his/her job will arrest or fine you or both. If I remember correct is the LAW IS FOR STRAIGHT WALL PISTOL CARTRIDGE RIFLE ONLY and in the printed info. available it also states the name of the pistol cartridges. Strangely enough you can hunt with rifle cartridge pistols.

hunting.IN.gov
6 Firearms: Shotguns, handguns, rifles with legal cartridges, muzzleloading long guns and muzzleloading handguns are legal during the firearm season. Only muzzleloading firearms are legal during the muzzleloader season. It is illegal to have a silencer while hunting. Laser sights are legal for hunting deer.
Hunters may carry more than one type of legal firearm when hunting during the firearm season only.
Shotguns must be 10-, 12-, 16- or 20- gauge or .410 bore loaded with slugs or saboted bullets. Rifled slug barrels are permitted. Combination rifle-shotguns are not allowed.
Muzzleloading firearms must be .44 caliber or larger, loaded with a single bullet of at least .357 caliber. Saboted bullets are allowed, provided the bullet is .357 caliber or larger. A muzzleloading firearm must be loaded from the muzzle. Multiple-barrel muzzleloading long guns are allowed.
Rifles with cartridges that fire a bullet of .357-inch diameter or larger; have a minimum case length of 1.16 inches; and have a maximum case length of 1.625 inches are legal to use only during the deer firearm season. Some cartridges legal for deer hunting include the .357 Magnum, .38-.40 Winchester, .41 Magnum, .41 Special, .44 Magnum, .44 Special, .44-.40 Winchester, .45 Colt, .454 Casull, .458 SOCOM, .475 Linebaugh, .480 Ruger, .50 Action Express, and .500 S&W.
Handguns for deer hunting:
Handguns, other than muzzle loading, must have a barrel at least 4 inches long and must fire a bullet of .243-inch diameter or larger. The handgun cartridge case, without the bullet, must be at least 1.16 inches long. Full metal-jacketed bullets are not permitted.
Handguns are not permitted on any military areas.
Some types of handgun cartridges legal for deer hunting include .357 Magnum, .41 Magnum, .44 Magnum, .44 Special, .45 Colt, .45 Long Colt, .45 Winchester Magnum, .35 Remington and .357 Herrett. Some illegal handgun cartridges for deer hunting are .38 Special, .38 Smith and Wesson, .38 Colt New Police, .38/200, .38 Long Colt, .38 Super, .38 ACP, .38 Colt Auto, .45 ACP, .45 Automatic and .45 Auto Rim. All .25/.20, .32/.20 and .30 carbine ammunition is prohibited.
Muzzleloading handguns are allowed. The muzzleloading handgun must be single shot, .50 caliber or larger, loaded with bullets at least .44 caliber and have a barrel at least 12 inches long, measured from the base of the breech plug excluding tangs and other projections to the end of the barrel, including the muzzle crown.
Carrying firearms:
An individual must not possess a handgun while hunting deer or while accompanying the youth hunter during the youth season unless the individual possesses a valid unlimited license to carry a handgun issued under IC 35-47-2; or is not required to possess a license to carry a handgun under IC 35-47-2-2. It is not legal to take a deer with a handgun except during the firearm and muzzleloader seasons and in compliance with DNR regulations.
Archery equipment:
Legal equipment includes long bows, compound bows or recurve bows and arrows. The bow must have a pull of at least 35 pounds. Arrows must be tipped with broadheads that are metal, metal-edged, or napped flint, chert or obsidian. Poisoned or exploding arrows are illegal.
Bows drawn, held or released by means other than by hand or hand-held releases may not be used. No portion of the bow’s riser or any track, trough, channel, arrow rest or other device that attaches to the bow’s riser can guide the arrow from a point back beyond the bow’s brace height. The common overdraw is still allowed as long as it does not extend beyond the string when the bow is relaxed.
Crossbows:
Crossbows are legal hunting equipment during the late archery deer season and can be used to harvest deer of either sex only in the late archery season. Crossbows must have a minimum 125-pound pull and a mechanical safety.

T:hmmmm:NY
 

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what happens if you use it shot and the game warden measures your empty case and finds it just over the legal limit? See if you can russle up an 1894 in 357mag.
 

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The 458 Socom is about as good as it gets for Indiana. I'd love to have an AR for that if I lived there.
 

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Here's the entry in its entirety from the 2011-2012 guide: "Shotguns, handguns, rifles with legal cartridges, muzzleloading long guns, and muzzleloading handguns are legal during this firearm season... Rifles with cartridges that fire a bullet of of .357-inch diameter or larger, have a minimum case length of 1.16 inches, and have a maximum case length of 1.625 inches are legal to use only during the deer firearm season. Some cartridges legal for deer hunting include the .357 Magnum, .38-40 Winchester, .41 Magnum, .41 Special, .44 Magnum, .44 Special, .44-40 Winchester, .45 Colt, .454 Casull, .458 SOCOM, .475 Linebaugh, .480 Ruger, .50 Action Express, and .500 S&W."

And there's this addendum that has just been released for the 2012-2013 deer hunting season: "The maximum rifle cartridge length that can be used in the firearm season has now been extended to 1.8 inches. This means that the .460 S&W, .450 Bushmaster, and .50 Beowulf will be legal to use during the deer firearms season."

...yes, every example they are supplying is a straight-walled case, but is there anything in the text that restricts bottle-neck cases? And by the way, the .450 Bushmaster, .458 SOCOM, and .50 Beowulf are not handgun cartridges.
The .38-40 and the .44-40 are not straight walled cases.
 
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