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HeltonPrecision said:
Just wondering what do I need to do too decrease the trigger pull on my Marlin 39A Thanks allot , Neel
Unless you know what you're doing, you should take it to a good gunsmith. Get refs.
 

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Get a Wolff reduced power spring from Brownell's. Part #969-000-018 @ $7.49 as of 11/04. Gave me a 40% reduction in trigger pull. Down to around 3 lbs. Had mis-fires with Blazer ammo (which also misfired on a Ruger MkII) but worked fine with everything else I tried. If you can separate your 39A, you should be able to install it. It is not hard.

Good luck.
 

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The reduced spring idea may have some merit. Before going into that, I'd check the trigger/hammer engagement surface for burrs. Sometimes polishing of these parts will help a lot. Getting the hammer and it's spring guide rod out of the frame can be a little tricky- I followed J.B. Wood's disassembly instructions in his rimfire rifles assembly/disassembly book. I think this one is still in print, but it's getting hard to find.

I posed a similar question to one of the contrbutors on the collector's page here. One of the things he said that can be done is slightly bending back the trigger spring- this is the little one at the bottom of the frame behind the trigger. Be careful not to bend it back too far- if you do, it will have to be removed from the frame to be straightened. You can also try cutting a coil off the main hammer spring. I'd tread carefully here- if you take off too much, a new replacement spring will be required.

As a last resort, the bottom engagement notch on the hammer can be reduced/reshaped with a knife sharpening stone. The steel is very hard on this notch- as a consequence, it's easy to get carried away and take off too much. The end result is a dangerous trigger- one that will set off from slight jarring. I've resurfaced this notch on a couple of old Winchesters that had too much taken off- not fun, and a heckuva lotta work....

Best bet would be to talk this over with a gunsmith- his fee for doing the work will be entirely worth it if you go that route- and about the safest...

Regards,

Doc Sharptail
 

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I think that spring replacement does little towards a quality trigger. Marlin over-emphasizes sear angles to make sure that triggers remain servicable for the longest period of time, and to keep their lawyers happy. The one true way to a quality trigger is to rework the sear angles and that's not an amateur's task. Get it to a good ( genuine) gunsmith and let him/her work the magic. A good trigger can be had with the factory mainspring in place -look at all the older guns that have very nice triggers. That should be the goal you shoot for. Good luck. ~Andrew
 

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Personally, I'm not all that sure I'd want to alter the hammer spring in my rifle- it has the heaviest pin strike of all my .22's, and I use it for touching off FTF's from the other guns. There are very few that don't light up under that hammer....

Polishing the notch and trigger surfaces with #600 wet/dry automotive paper, and lubing with anhydrous graphite seems to take a lot of grit off the pull...

Regards,

Doc Sharptail
 

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For less than $10.00, the Wolff spring is a good starting point. :roll: You can always revert back to the original one if it is not to your liking. :wink: To my understanding, sears are hardened, and need to be re-hardened after any grinding or polishing, particularly if material is removed. :? THAT is definitely gunsmith work.

Polishing the sides of the trigger and the hammer, as well as the various pins and screws where the trigger, hammer and finger lever pivot also helps smooth things out and are not too difficult to do if you're careful and so inclined. 8)
 

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Hardening

From what I've seen so far of lever action triggers, a lot of metal will have to be removed before re-hardening is required. Polishing the engagement surfaces won't remove enough to get through the hardened steel. At any rate, the gunsmith's advice is tops when it comes to these triggers.

Regards,

Doc Sharptail
 
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