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Discussion Starter #1
Recently I did a little touch-up work on a 39A using 44-40 Bluing. It applied fairly well, looked OK right after, but one week later it has turned brownish; seems like I did read somewhere that cold bluing does not protect from rust. Now I guess I will trry to re-blue the same area; can anyone recommend a way to keep from the touch-up looking fresh? How about a thin layer of Rem-Oil as soon as possible after the bluing sets? Would appreciate any tips -
 

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marlinmounter said:
Recently I did a little touch-up work on a 39A using 44-40 Bluing. It applied fairly well, looked OK right after, but one week later it has turned brownish; seems like I did read somewhere that cold bluing does not protect from rust. Now I guess I will trry to re-blue the same area; can anyone recommend a way to keep from the touch-up looking fresh? How about a thin layer of Rem-Oil as soon as possible after the bluing sets? Would appreciate any tips -
I've used 44-40. I tend to get blotchy results but I think that is more reflective of my novice attempts than the product. ;D

But, it has held up well. I've read a lot about cold bluing not being as effective as hot bluing but I often wonder...I mean, when a smith does a barrel re-crown or other small work, they use cold bluing and no one thinks twice about it.

Maybe yours is a surface prep issue? Just tossing something out there is all.
 

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Make sure the area that is to be blued is degreased, heat under a heatlamp or toaster oven if a smallish part, do multiple coats and when done, oil the area.

Hip
 

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I use Birchwood Casey Perma Blue and my process is as follows:

I degrease with denatured alcohol, heat the part in boiling water and remove quickly to the work area (any water on the part will flash off). I apply the solution with a cotton ball well soaked. Keep the solution on and moving for 60 seconds then rinse. Buff lightly with degreased 4 aught steel wool and repeat the process 3 or more times. The last application, I do not buff, but instead drop the part into a container of motor oil and let it pickle for at least 24 hours. Then I remove, give it the final buff (with the oil still on the part) wipe it off and decide if I'm happy. Usually I am, but if I'm not, I start again.

For most steels this gives me a decent depth of finish and reasonable durability.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Guys,

I appreciate all the pointers...I did not heat the area, nor did I do enough coats. Will start over and do 'er again with your sugestions...
 

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The oil pickling after final application is very important. Don't be shy. If the part is too large to drop in a bath, really slather it on. Dripping excess is what you're looking for and at least 24 hours before you disturb it.
 

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Some good gun oil when done will stop the bluing process. With out it I think is why it's turning brown. Yes do degease I use brake cleen and heat with a hair dryer then blue.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Guys,

After my first poor attempt at cold bluing, I took all your advice in, used Imashooter's method (the touch-up was the rear sight dovetail - I installed a Skinner peep, removed factory notch rear sight, and unfortunately buggered the blank trying to fill in the empty dovetail slot). So, I used a small fine file, smoothed the blank down almost flush with the barrel, but unavoidably left a few scratches on the barrel. I taped off the area to be reblued, degreased as per Imashooter's instructions, heated barrel with hot hairdryer per Leveraddict, and used a cotton ball to put the bluing on the dovetail blank and adjacent barrel scratches. Then repeated 2 times, lightly buffing with 0000 steel wool between applications, and soaked a cloth in RemOil and BreakFree, laid on top of the barrel, and the next day, I can hardly tell where the professional bluing ends and my amateur bluing blends in...might degrease and try 1 or 2 more coats to make perfect, but it really looks great now, and no brown has appeared I would assume due to the heavy oil treatment.

Gunsmith I am apparently not, but you guys saved the day...Thanks! You are why I love MO!
 
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