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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've used Tru-Oil a couple times but have never tried spraying it.
I have this little airgun sprayer that I have never used and have been toying with the idea of shooting my M60.
I've googled around the net and have heard different thinners being used from Lacquer Thinner to Mineral Spirits. Mostly Mineral Spirits.

Someone want to recommend a thinner and ratio for Tru-Oil ?
 

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I would vote for paint thinner/mineral spirits, laquer is a completely different base....
 
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I'd try the spray but I have a couple unopened bottles that I want to use.

furlong
Any ratio on the thinner?
I've got both Mineral Spirits and Paint Thinner
 

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I thin mine with mineral spirits... But, I'll say that I've never tried to spray it on. Still re-finish stocks the old way, by hand and lots of rubbing. Mineral Spirits in Tru-Oil reduces the working time considerably (less than 20 minutes after application), makes for a shorter overall duration of the drying time, and seems to help make for a more uniform covering. Down side of thinning and hand-rubbed Tru-Oil finishing is that instead of getting by with two or three coats, I opt for four or five for a more uniform finish.

Last stock that I did, I thinned it one part of Mineral Spirits to two parts of Tru-Oil - - but again, that was for hand-rubbing, not spraying.

336C Before_1_1[2].JPG 336C During_1_1[2].JPG 336C Finished_1_1[2].JPG

Those photos are from my 336C (L. to R.): Before, During, and After.
 

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the ratio will depend on the sprayer/pressure/ tip size etc....start with 2truoil:1thinner and if its not right add a bit of the appropriate product-stir well....thinner material requires lighter coats the biggest mistake most people make on their first try is - too thick a coat-(not moving the sprayer fast enough) you get runs, if you catch the run immediately just wipe it off with your finger...you can clean up your gun by running thinner through it and a thorough ...thinner washing rag wipe down....paint thinner and mineral spirits are pretty much the same thing...turpentine is to....just a little practice and it turns out perfect...by the time you get a few coats on you'll be a pro....
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
It sure would be easier to just do it the hand way.

What I want to do is not disturb the oil/dye that I've already put on the stock, so I sort of thought it would have less impact to mist on some Tru-Oil and sort of seal it up.
I've got a zillion coats of Watco Danish Oil and Tanstint Dye which is drying now (for a few days) before I proceed.

I read that you can muddy up the finish by disturbing the oil/dye by rubbing on it so I'm trying hard not to do that. I also read that it's not good to mix the spray can Tru-Oil and the hand rub Tru-Oil, otherwise I could just go buy a spray can and start with that.

Jump in here if you think my information/thinking has gone askew
 

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be patient and let the watco cure until it has hardened....then gently apply tru oil by hand...when that cures you can rub it out with steel wool and reapply...be sure to get the tiny steel wool fragments cleaned off...

when putting the tru oil on watch for any smearing or blurring of the color - muddy -...if this happens its the truoil blending with excess color on the surface of the wood....wash it down with thinner and a lint free rag removing the truoil and the excess color...then tru oil it when it dries...the wood will only take so much stain then it collects on the surface and mixes with the next product...thats where the muddy or blurry look comes from...

laquer will get cloudy when the humidity is exceptionally high but have never had it happen with an oil base product...
 

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Lacquer thinner is basically acetone, not suitable for an oil base finish. Mineral spirits, as others have said, or turpentine (gum spirits) will thin tru oil.
 

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"be patient and let the watco cure until it has hardened" Once again ignorance spoken on the internet. Danish Oil does NOT harden. It is absorbed in the wood. I have been using danish oil since 90.
If it hardened there would be no need for a hardened finish like tru-oil.
 

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"be patient and let the watco cure until it has hardened" Once again ignorance spoken on the internet. Danish Oil does NOT harden. It is absorbed in the wood. I have been using danish oil since 90.
If it hardened there would be no need for a hardened finish like tru-oil.
nice fella....
 
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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
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"be patient and let the watco cure until it has hardened" Once again ignorance spoken on the internet. Danish Oil does NOT harden. It is absorbed in the wood. I have been using danish oil since 90.
If it hardened there would be no need for a hardened finish like tru-oil.
Ahem...

Danish oil is a 'long oil' finish: a mixture of oil and varnish, predominantly of oil. A typical Danish oil is around one third varnish. The function of Danish oil is to provide a hard-wearing finish, rather than a particularly fine or high-gloss finish. Compared to oil, it is hard-wearing. Compared to a varnish, it is simple to apply. As the finished coating is not glossy or slippery, it is a suitable finish for tool handles, giving some additional weather resistance.

Danish oil is a hard drying oil which provides a tough, water-resistant finish. It can be used as a finish, or as a primer or sealer on bare wood before applying paint or varnish.

You might want to let the Watco folks, that made my can of Danish Oil, know that they are wrong... I copied this from the back of the can.

Danish oil, does in fact "harden" - - not like a polyurethane, but it does harden - - because of the amount of varnish that is in it. It is a bit tougher to repair on gun stocks that get scuffed, scratched, or scarred than a straight oil finish is, and that's the primary reason I don't use much of it in this application anymore.

Tru-oil is a blend of 56% Mineral Spirits, 33% "Modified Oil" (a proprietary drying oil that has likely been polymerized), and 11% "Linseed Oil" (again, proprietary, but I reckon it's a polymerized version of BLO).

Comparing Tru-Oil to Danish Oil, Danish Oil has roughly equal parts of these: Drying Oil, Varnish, and Mineral Spirits, whereas Tru-Oil has 1 part BLO, 3 parts "Modified Oil" (effectively a varnish), and 5 parts Mineral Spirits. So from that, Danish Oil should produce a slightly harder finish than Tru-Oil.

FWIW, some of us have been refinishing gun stocks and such since the 70's, and most of us have been there, done that - - more times that we can count. We all have subtly different methods for re-finishing, and that is based on years, nay, decades of experience, and re-re-finishing our mistakes. Hopefully most of us have learned a little something, here and there, along the way from our mistakes... Hence this sharing of info.

So... Before some folks decide to go and get all finger-pointy about someone else's comments and declaring ignorance, they may want to do some more research... That's the problem with pointing fingers - - most folks have three pointing back at themselves, and that part of it is self-inflicted... Just sayin'. :biggrin:
 

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FWIW......when i refinish a stock after prep i start with tru oil mixed with #1 grade paint thinner mixed 50-50, apply liberal amount, wet sand with 400 till i get a little slurry, wipe the slurry off across the grain, let it dry, sand lightly with 400, reapply till the pores are all filled then use 1 coat of straight tru oil for final coat. I can't speak to spraying tru oil, i have no experience doing that.........Mike
 

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Over on the Rimfire Central forum, there's a bunch of stuff a guy posted there about his stock elixir. Basically, instead of thinning tru-oil, what you do is use original formula Armorall. You rub it onto a section of wood, and then immediately follow with a hand rubbed coat of tru-oil. You repeat this a couple of times.

After two or three coats, you end up with an astonishingly beautiful finish. It really works. A number of other folks posted pics of their results and it is impressive.

The guy who discovered it doesn't know why the Armorall/Tru-Oil combo works like it does, but others have speculated about the ingredients and possible chemical reactions that could be going on. Bottom line is it works really, really well.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Over on the Rimfire Central forum, there's a bunch of stuff a guy posted there about his stock elixir. Basically, instead of thinning tru-oil, what you do is use original formula Armorall. You rub it onto a section of wood, and then immediately follow with a hand rubbed coat of tru-oil. You repeat this a couple of times.

After two or three coats, you end up with an astonishingly beautiful finish. It really works. A number of other folks posted pics of their results and it is impressive.

The guy who discovered it doesn't know why the Armorall/Tru-Oil combo works like it does, but others have speculated about the ingredients and possible chemical reactions that could be going on. Bottom line is it works really, really well.
weird....
 

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One of the famed stock makers of the past, cant recall which one, once quipped, "I have never applied a finish on a stock, that I was perfectly happy with". And after having done several handfuls over the years, I can concur with the man.

Its a deal, of Its not what you got, its what you do with what you got type thing. There is no magic finish, an impatient guy can ruin a stock, a patient worker can do miracles with something found at a paint store advertised for coffee table finish.

All tru oil is, is linseed with driers added. One can make their own, with japan drier, available from an art store, added to a can of linseed oil found at lowes, and a whole lot cheaper, now that CA has banned tru oil, and yes, I am serious about that.

Tru oil is one of the most over rated products ever put into a bottle as far as what most pros use. Its simply too thick even to rub in for the most part, to spray it would be a chore even thinned. It simply drys too quick in most environments. given that, I know pros that use it. Again, any finish can be learned by the user to do what they want.

For a good durable finish the urethanes have any of the oils beat like a red headed step child. They are more water proof by far, and seal head and tails above the oils. Same with good old spar varnish being more durable. but again, it all depends on how its applied.

I have sanded in watco danish oil to a built up finish, and yes, its "hard" Done the same with tung oil, varnish, linseed, and urethanes and minwax too boot. One can get pretty much what ever they desire, if they keep dinking with what ever finish they choose.

There is no 5 simple steps for a perfect finish, Every chunk of wood is different, every environment the finish applied in is a bit different. One reason the old linseed got such a reputation, was cause the didnt have any thing better. Its for sure one good way to really ruin a good piece of wood by covering up any grain the wood ever had. And then it soaks up water about the same way.

Thus "tru oil" and "lins peed" were born to try to get the best of both worlds, a quick finish, that an amateur could make look pretty good in less than a months work.:biggrin:

If ya have a gun that actually gets used and carried, and sweated on, one realizes pretty quick, how poor the "classic oil finish" is for durability. I can see it in a couple of my squirrel guns, some one used tru oil type finish on years back. Around the grip and cheek piece, and where the forend sits on the front rest bag, is pretty thin and grungy.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
So today is the day

I got out my oh-so-cheap Harbor Freight HVLP spray gun and associated stuff. It's a model 47016
I was going to rig up a Lazy Susan and get real fancy but then I stopped and asked myself why.
So I went to Home Depot and bought enough stuff to do the job. Thought I would show what I came up with.

Picture one
I had this 2x12 column laying around that I had used for a temporary telescope mount so that became my table.

That's a 10" angle bracket.
I drilled a hole through my plywood stock mounting sheet and ran a 5/16" carriage bolt through it and used a couple nuts and washers for my bearing assembly. I have to tighten up the nut every once in a while as they are only hand tight
Normally the plywood is what I use to screw my stock(s) to, to hold the stock vertical while I put the finish on by hand.
I used a c-clamp to hold the spray gun stand to the top of the work bench

Picture two
I use the butt plate screw holes and separate the stock from the plywood with a couple nylon spacers.


I am able to apply a pass and grab the plywood and rotate it a bit and do another pass.

I don't know how well this is going to come out.. I'm not a very good sprayer.
I've got a little orange peel going right now, but it sure will be sealed up, even if I have to sand it back and try again.

So far so good

View attachment 108608

View attachment 108609
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
From when I took the pictures....
I tried mixing the Tru-oil 1 Tru-Oil to 2 mineral spirits. Didn't wait long enough between coats and got runs.
Let it dry and sanded it back. I found that I could take my jack-knife and scrape lightly on the runs and they would sort of roll off.

Sanded back to 600 grit.
Sprayed again this time using 2 Tru-oil to 1 mineral spirits allowing an hour in between coats on an 80° day
No runs

Now letting it dry

I also bought a 10" bench buffer and might try some light buffing in a couple weeks.
 
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