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Discussion Starter #1
So, I finally got the help I needed to get this little project started. I've been tinkering with this idea in my head for a few years now and finally this past weekend, the first step was taken.
The backstory: My wife's parents own (with 2 of my MIL's brothers) a small hunting/recreational cabin. Its a really great little hole in the wall for all of us to enjoy and get away for a weekend or just about anything else we want to do. And of course, as most stories like this go, there is this often forgotten jon boat just sitting there next to the wood shed. There is nothing special about it, it's just a 12' Grumman with a modified v-hull. As often as the cabin gets used by the owners, family and friends, I can only remember one time where I have seen this boat out on the water. I know I would really enjoy taking it out, but unfortunately, there is always an excuse to get in the way. One of those excuses bothers me more than most though: Because it sits there unused, it is generally treated as just something in the yard and would require a weekends worth of work just to put it on the water for a couple of hours. So this is where I've decided to take some action. Originally my plan was a bit bigger, I saw some videos of modified jon boats with all the bells and whistles of a regular bass boat and I thought it would be great to take this jon boat t that level. I even did quite a bit of research on materials, costs etc... After mulling this over for a couple years I've come down to reality a bit and really just want this thing to be water ready.

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The Plan: As you can see in the photos, the boat is actually in decent shape. A good pressure washing and I wouldn't be afraid to put it on the water. With that said, there is some rotten wood on the transom that will need to be replaced. The trailer on the other hand needs quite a bit of work, the good news is that the frame and axles seem to be in good shape, so it is mostly the bolt on items that need to be replaced.

Thank you to anyone who has read this far. I'm posting this thread as a kind of diary, so as I make progress on the project, I will update accordingly, though it is a spare time project so no guarantees updates will happen at regular intervals. Thank you if you've read this far, I do appreciate it, I hope I didn't ramble too much.
 

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Just remember a boat is a money pit!

Now enjoy yourself and take your time. I bet it will work out good for you.

ca'jun56
A big hole in the water you pour money into...
 

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If that tandem trailer the boat is on is the trailer for the boat, you have 4 times as much trailer as you need for that little Jon.
Could you possibly sell that trailer using the money to buy a smaller handier trailer for the boat and maybe have some cash left over to refurbish the boat?

Tried to dlete post, finally saw the little trailer underneath the boat....nevermind!.........
 

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I just finished putting a Lund aluminum row boat back to useable condition. Other than a few hours of hull cleaning and painting, I replaced the wood seats and added a carpeted floor. I have maybe $150 in materials in it.
The nice thing about small boats like this, is that someone doesn't need to spend a lot of money to get on the water.
Andrew
IMG_0052.JPG
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Wait, you mean I don’t need a tandem axle trailer for my boat? Just Kidding. The big trailer is just to get the whole works home so it’ll be easier to work on. Till all is said and done I figure we will end up spending about $300-400 to get the boat and trailer to a functioning state, with the trailer using up most of that budget. What I haven’t factored in yet are the accessories that will be needed. There is an assortment of life jackets, paddles, etc.. in the shed at the cabin, but I haven’t been to concerned to sort it all out yet.

There is a 9.9hp motor and an electric trolling motor at the cabin. I’m told the gas motor is good, but I’ve never seen it leave the shed in the last 14 years I’ve been welcome at the cabin. Hopefully it doesn’t need much to get it running again. I know the trolling motor works and we have several family members that work at the local Deka plant, so a new battery is nothing more than a phone call.
The trolling motor is more important anyway. Most of the lakes/ponds this boat will be used for are electric only.
 

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Wait, you mean I don’t need a tandem axle trailer for my boat? Just Kidding. The big trailer is just to get the whole works home so it’ll be easier to work on. Till all is said and done I figure we will end up spending about $300-400 to get the boat and trailer to a functioning state, with the trailer using up most of that budget. What I haven’t factored in yet are the accessories that will be needed. There is an assortment of life jackets, paddles, etc.. in the shed at the cabin, but I haven’t been to concerned to sort it all out yet. There is a 9.9hp motor and an electric trolling motor at the cabin. I’m told the gas motor is good, but I’ve never seen it leave the shed in the last 14 years I’ve been welcome at the cabin. Hopefully it doesn’t need much to get it running again. I know the trolling motor works and we have several family members that work at the local Deka plant, so a new battery is nothing more than a phone call. The trolling motor is more important anyway. Most of the lakes/ponds this boat will be used for are electric only.
If the 9.9 has not been run in 14 years, that could be a project all by itself. Good thing you'll be fishing electric only lakes.
 

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Break
Out
Another
Thousand
:top:

Looks like a fun project. Boats like that are actually very cost effective to fix up and keep on the water. so you're not having to sell the children to finance the work! The engine is where all the money will go. that;s gotta be reliable! then all the little accessories can be added over time.
 

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As J Bobway said, Go for it.
Our boy and his son are in the process of refurbing his Grandads old boat that has been stored here at my place. We slid the boat off the trailer a few weeks ago and he took the trailer to his home. My grandson is sanding and painting it (his summer project). The new wheel bearings and wheel studs came in this week. I helped out by cleaning and repainting the hubs. Check around you might find a kid, son, nephew or niece that might like to help out.
 

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Thanks for sharing your boat project, and best of luck to you!

I bought a 16ft 1974 Sears V-hull row boat with trailer a few years ago. The boat and trailer needed work, but I was able to do the work myself. It never had a wood floor in it, so I decided to keep it that way. Talk about a great little boat, and virtually maintenance-free. I have a fish finder on it, a 45lb thrust electric trolling motor, a 3.3hp Evinrude 2-stroke motor, and some rod holders. I even have 2 manual Penn downriggers on it for trolling our deeper lakes.

Looking forward to seeing your progress :tee:
 

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Your comment about electric only lakes got me wondering. There are a few electric only lakes around here, mostly inside the urban areas.
This has me "pipe dreaming" about the future when battery technology catches up and there is the possibility of having small electric outboard motors.
For instance, White Rock Lake is inside Dallas city limits and is electric only. It is a marvelous lake to cruise the shoreline on a calm summer day, and would lend itself perfectly for an electric, say 5 horse motor.
Clean, quiet, No oil/fuel in the water. And considering the pitiful quality of gasoline these days electric may be a maintenance godsend.
My last boat was several decades ago, and had a 150 horse motor on it, so maybe I don't see something here, but I'm thinking that some of the large trolling motors aren't that far away from being small outboard motors. Thoughts?
 

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Your comment about electric only lakes got me wondering. There are a few electric only lakes around here, mostly inside the urban areas.
This has me "pipe dreaming" about the future when battery technology catches up and there is the possibility of having small electric outboard motors.
For instance, White Rock Lake is inside Dallas city limits and is electric only. It is a marvelous lake to cruise the shoreline on a calm summer day, and would lend itself perfectly for an electric, say 5 horse motor.
Clean, quiet, No oil/fuel in the water. And considering the pitiful quality of gasoline these days electric may be a maintenance godsend.
My last boat was several decades ago, and had a 150 horse motor on it, so maybe I don't see something here, but I'm thinking that some of the large trolling motors aren't that far away from being small outboard motors. Thoughts?
The big trolling motors are usually 36 volt units that require 3 large boat batteries to run, which are usually found on the big bass and walleye boats. Not practical on a small boat like this one.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
When you get upwards of 55lb thrust you start getting into 24v and 36v trolling motors. Ballistics04 is right, those things are overkill for my little boat, however, they would somewhat equivalent to a small outboard as the primary propulsion.

I have seen some videos of electric outboard motors, so the technology is being developed. I don't remember who the company was, it was some impressive power output, but the price was ridiculous. I agree that battery technology is the limiting factor though. The advantage that keeps fuel engines on top right now essentially comes down to range; it only takes a few minutes to refuel the gas tank and then you're off again, but on the flip side even the best batteries still require a substantial charging cycle, plus batteries large enough to equal the range of a typical gas counterpart generally come at the cost of extra weight.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
As J Bobway said, Go for it.
Our boy and his son are in the process of refurbing his Grandads old boat that has been stored here at my place. We slid the boat off the trailer a few weeks ago and he took the trailer to his home. My grandson is sanding and painting it (his summer project). The new wheel bearings and wheel studs came in this week. I helped out by cleaning and repainting the hubs. Check around you might find a kid, son, nephew or niece that might like to help out.
I've got four kids of my own that will be helping out, whether they want to or not. My 19yr old has already volunteered to help with sanding the trailer.
 

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Your comment about electric only lakes got me wondering. There are a few electric only lakes around here, mostly inside the urban areas.
This has me "pipe dreaming" about the future when battery technology catches up and there is the possibility of having small electric outboard motors.
For instance, White Rock Lake is inside Dallas city limits and is electric only. It is a marvelous lake to cruise the shoreline on a calm summer day, and would lend itself perfectly for an electric, say 5 horse motor.
Clean, quiet, No oil/fuel in the water. And considering the pitiful quality of gasoline these days electric may be a maintenance godsend.
My last boat was several decades ago, and had a 150 horse motor on it, so maybe I don't see something here, but I'm thinking that some of the large trolling motors aren't that far away from being small outboard motors. Thoughts?
Elcow and Torqeedo are two companies that make actual outboards that are electric. They are rated in horsepower and require up to four 12V batteries.
With a small boat, the batteries could be laid out and secured, so that the boat floats and planes evenly.
Andrew
 

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I do a lot of trolling while casting for bass with an electric motor. I use a 45lb thrust on my 16 foot Lund Deep V and it lasts most of the time I am out. I keep a spare battery for it. On my 14 foot rig I have a 40 lb thrust. Wind is the biggest factor as they have an issue bucking wind but often I just motor up wind then kind of drift and fish with the wind. I have a good charger so I keep the batteries charged. I have one lake that I could survive on Electric motor only. Personally I would consider a tandem motor set. A larger 50-55 thrust motor for getting there and a smaller 40 pound or even 30 pound for trolling. Tiller steered transom motors are pretty inexpensive as compared to the electronic marvels some now have mounted on bass boats.

DEP
 
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