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Seems every few weeks I get to enjoy a nice couple hours with the camera, a few guns, and my energetic hound dog beating around the land. Figured a few of ya'll did the same and we could all share and enjoy our little pieces of the pie together :biggrin:


This evening was particularly nice here in NW MS. About 65* and overcast. The grass at the place is ready for the years' first cut but it is nice to watch it flow like a wave with the wind!

Spot pictured here is the front 5 or so acres. Be a nice place for a house some day:





Annie is good at instantly getting into everything & after running in circles for about 10 minutes she needed a break:





Ol' hound pretending she's a pointer:





These are my other walking partners for the day. A restored Winchester '97 with screw chokes, my 696, and a 'hawk a friend made.





You could still see a bit of last nights rain in the back corner. This is the only access to our back 15 acres by truck or tractor.





Hard to beat that fog of fresh honeysuckles in the air!





If you folks have no experience with the locust tree, my tires envy you :)





That little hawk does great work on small trees and path clearing duty.





Annie the trail blazer:





Attempted an action shot but my shutter speed wasn't quite quick enough.







And a final shot of the middle 15 or so acres. Most of my shooting goes on in this area.

 

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Pretty place kinda makes me homesick. I was pretty lucky growing up in E-Texas but I really didn't realize it for a long time. My Dad bought a little farm of 100 acres and had some cows and bailed hay for a living until he got a job of Tax Assessor and Collector for the county and then had a office job for 30 years. I always went out to the farm and shot the 22 and fished until he bought some more cows and needed a bigger place to run them. He leased 10,000 acres with another man and they each ran their cattle on the place. He leased the land from the paper company and back then the lease was very cheap. I had a new place to explore and it was really something although I didn't realize it then. It was about 10 miles from the nearest house and had good roads thru the place but had a big creek on the place and if it rained you had to wait a while for the creek to go down before you could cross it. The creek had long pools in it that were 6 to 8 foot deep and around 60 feet wide and white sand and magnolia trees lining the bank. It was full of bass perch and catfish just begging to be caught. The high banks had caved off at some time and there were huge boulders bigger than a deepfreeze piled up in the water and the water would blast through them and then start a slow eddy into a calm pool downstream where the catfish lay in wait for some food being washed down to them. I can't begin to tell you how serene the place was with no outside sounds except for the occasional airplane that flew over way up high. The place was a game perserve with no hunting allowed but I never saw hardly anyone there except the occasional timber cruiser guy and no one ever ask what I was doing there, I knew most of them or they knew my Dad. There were red wolves, fox, coyotes, bobcats, hogs and all kinds of wildlife. It had the largest chinkapin tree in the United States on it. I think the sign in front of the tree said Allegenny Chichapin-- Crown 68 ft and some more info on it but I don't remember what else it said. The creek was named after a Indian tribe and what bothers me most was I never even thought to look for arrowheads which I am sure were hidden in the holes on the creek bottom an everytime the creek would rise I bet it washed them down the creek and when the creek went back down you could see holes of the dry bottom full of gravel but I never raked around in the gravel, I wished I had. A bunch of times I would go there with my dog and we would spend the whole day just relaxing and fishing and exploring. I can still smell the creek water and remember the memories and that is what keeps most of us going strong. If they ever invented a time machine that is the first place I would return to and this time I would appreciate it more.
 

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Eaglestroker - good stuff. Our old friend, Bestlever (Jim Lawrence) used to post stories and photos like that when he'd spend a day up on his mountain or on his river, usually with his dog. I miss those posts.

Time to time I try to do something similar. Will get back on this. I could see this becoming a sticky if enough folks start posting their adventures.

Regards, Guy
 

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Eaglestroker, thank you for the delightful thread. The pictures make it seam as though I'm on that walk with you. That locust is the honey locust, the deer in this area love the pods, a preferred food source in the fall.
Uncle Sid
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Great day and thanks for sharing the pics. Heckofa better day than I had at the office!

1895gunner
My day at the shop wasn't much better. Sure love the longer days of summer!

Eaglestroker - good stuff. Our old friend, Bestlever (Jim Lawrence) used to post stories and photos like that when he'd spend a day up on his mountain or on his river, usually with his dog. I miss those posts.

Time to time I try to do something similar. Will get back on this. I could see this becoming a sticky if enough folks start posting their adventures.

Regards, Guy
Hey Guy, those posts must have been before my time. Sure wish I had my own mountain or river (especially river, really) but a little green and some trees is just find.

Look forward to your contribution!

Eaglestroker, thank you for the delightful thread. The pictures make it seam as though I'm on that walk with you. That locust is the honey locust, the deer in this area love the pods, a preferred food source in the fall.
Uncle Sid
Thanks Sid! The deer do love the locust pods and our game trails snake through the woods from tree to tree. They make pretty good fence posts too.

Pretty place kinda makes me homesick. I was pretty lucky growing up in E-Texas but I really didn't realize it for a long time. My Dad bought a little farm of 100 acres and had some cows and bailed hay for a living until he got a job of Tax Assessor and Collector for the county and then had a office job for 30 years. I always went out to the farm and shot the 22 and fished until he bought some more cows and needed a bigger place to run them. He leased 10,000 acres with another man and they each ran their cattle on the place. He leased the land from the paper company and back then the lease was very cheap. I had a new place to explore and it was really something although I didn't realize it then. It was about 10 miles from the nearest house and had good roads thru the place but had a big creek on the place and if it rained you had to wait a while for the creek to go down before you could cross it. The creek had long pools in it that were 6 to 8 foot deep and around 60 feet wide and white sand and magnolia trees lining the bank. It was full of bass perch and catfish just begging to be caught. The high banks had caved off at some time and there were huge boulders bigger than a deepfreeze piled up in the water and the water would blast through them and then start a slow eddy into a calm pool downstream where the catfish lay in wait for some food being washed down to them. I can't begin to tell you how serene the place was with no outside sounds except for the occasional airplane that flew over way up high. The place was a game perserve with no hunting allowed but I never saw hardly anyone there except the occasional timber cruiser guy and no one ever ask what I was doing there, I knew most of them or they knew my Dad. There were red wolves, fox, coyotes, bobcats, hogs and all kinds of wildlife. It had the largest chinkapin tree in the United States on it. I think the sign in front of the tree said Allegenny Chichapin-- Crown 68 ft and some more info on it but I don't remember what else it said. The creek was named after a Indian tribe and what bothers me most was I never even thought to look for arrowheads which I am sure were hidden in the holes on the creek bottom an everytime the creek would rise I bet it washed them down the creek and when the creek went back down you could see holes of the dry bottom full of gravel but I never raked around in the gravel, I wished I had. A bunch of times I would go there with my dog and we would spend the whole day just relaxing and fishing and exploring. I can still smell the creek water and remember the memories and that is what keeps most of us going strong. If they ever invented a time machine that is the first place I would return to and this time I would appreciate it more.
Sounds like a wonderful way to grow up. You talking about your old stomping grounds reminds be a lot of my fiance's grandmothers cabin/surrounding area in the Ozark foothills. Her neighbor up the mountain is a big time arrowhead collector and builds knives made of stone. He told me that he's discovered and plotted several hundred indian campgrounds in the area along with collecting a large rooms worth of artifacts to back his claims up. It was amazing to me as I'd have no idea what I was looking for!

The cabin is nice with about 80 acres that are hers. The neighbor lets us take the horses on his 2,000 that surrounds the whole area. These are some old pictures but serve the purpose. Appreciate you sharing!

This is the cabin, my fiance, and our two 'kids' about 3 years ago. Was actually the first weekend I had adopted my hound dog Annie.





One of two large food plots on her part of the property:





The original homesteaders left their wagon - they were the fella who still owns the places' great great grandparents. There are the remnants of a chimney in the same area where they built the first cabin.






Horse is always the easiest way to get around. This creek is great for fishing & swimming in the summer time.






And just some ol' cattle grazing land. Sure is a fun place to explore!


 

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Hey Eaglestroker, Thanks for the story and back up with the pic's, really enjoyed it all, like other's it takes you back
to a place you new of or lived on. It did me, New Mexico ranch!, how I enjoyed that area and would love to
just spend a few hours there again looking around but a little to broke up and little to far down the slide of life.
Thanks for the memories.


Team 40-70 #1214
John



"This is America," "Everyones's got a bone to pick."
 

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Here's a few photos of favorite places I've rambled. Sometimes on foot, sometimes via 4x4, motorcycle or occasionally horseback:

Fly fishing for steelhead, here in Washington:




Wild turkey here in Washington earlier this spring. Before season of course...


I dearly love taking a walk during mule deer season!


My son snapped this one of me on a 10 mile hike through "our" Cascades last summer:


He's my favorite hiking, hunting and fishing buddy. Someday he'll be too busy for his ol' dad, but not yet:


I'm sitting here at home nursing a real sore back. Fell this morning while packing up to head out for a day at the pistol range. Ice & ibuprofen are my friends right now. When I heal up, I'll post a current walk, instead of this old stuff.

Regards, Guy
 

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Hey Robert,

Regular slice of Paradise!

Later, Mark
 
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This could for sure be a great thread to keep going!
 

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This could for sure be a great thread to keep going!
i like seeing pics of your wilderness areas. Some very pretty places with big dense forests. Always looks peaceful when its green. The trees here are all canopy,not much foliage close to the ground. Makes it easier to get around thou'.
 

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Love the stories along with pics!
 
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We only have five acres here--and in the city limits to boot, but we do have a small patch of woods with a nice creek. Our place used to be outside of town and we have a cool old barn where my wife has chickens, a llama, and a few alpacas (eggs and yarn). As is almost always the case, where there are chickens, there are coyotes. The murderous dogs have nailed a few of her chickens resulting in a declaration of war. Last night we sat in the blind below, constructed specifically for coyote control, and called for a couple of hours with a crossbow. No coyotes, but we called in a bunch of birds, rabbit, a cat, and two huge owls--one of which glided through the woods and landed about ten feet from us. Wonderful and peaceful night even without the pelt...

View attachment Blind Apr 14 The Victims Perspective.jpg

Another from a hike in Yellowstone National Park several years ago.

View attachment October Meadow Yellowstone 2010.jpg
 

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Hey Robert,

Great pictures and a great thread to start!

Gare
 
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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Hey Eaglestroker, Thanks for the story and back up with the pic's, really enjoyed it all, like other's it takes you back
to a place you new of or lived on. It did me, New Mexico ranch!, how I enjoyed that area and would love to
just spend a few hours there again looking around but a little to broke up and little to far down the slide of life.
Thanks for the memories.
John, glad to put you in another place for a bit! Such is the pace of life and 'progress'!

Eaglestroker - Yes, Jim passed away unexpectedly, but peacefully, a few years ago.

http://www.marlinowners.com/forum/silent-gun/59043-sad-news-bestlever-has-passed-away.html

It's worth looking up some of his old posts. Great reading, mostly about his adventures along and above the Rogue River, Oregon.

Guy
Thanks Guy I will look into those!

Robert and Guy great photos. Thanks for the escape from everyday life here. I enjoyed it! Mark.
Glad Mark!

Hey Robert,

Regular slice of Paradise!

Later, Mark
We only have five acres here--and in the city limits to boot, but we do have a small patch of woods with a nice creek. Our place used to be outside of town and we have a cool old barn where my wife has chickens, a llama, and a few alpacas (eggs and yarn). As is almost always the case, where there are chickens, there are coyotes. The murderous dogs have nailed a few of her chickens resulting in a declaration of war. Last night we sat in the blind below, constructed specifically for coyote control, and called for a couple of hours with a crossbow. No coyotes, but we called in a bunch of birds, rabbit, a cat, and two huge owls--one of which glided through the woods and landed about ten feet from us. Wonderful and peaceful night even without the pelt...

View attachment 104325

Another from a hike in Yellowstone National Park several years ago.

View attachment 104326
Thanks for sharing! We have one that is extremely large hanging around the grandads place, but he's a smart one. First time he slips up we will be ready :)

Hey Robert,

Great pictures and a great thread to start!

Gare
Thanks Gare!


Here's a few photos of favorite places I've rambled. Sometimes on foot, sometimes via 4x4, motorcycle or occasionally horseback:

Fly fishing for steelhead, here in Washington:




Wild turkey here in Washington earlier this spring. Before season of course...


I dearly love taking a walk during mule deer season!


My son snapped this one of me on a 10 mile hike through "our" Cascades last summer:


He's my favorite hiking, hunting and fishing buddy. Someday he'll be too busy for his ol' dad, but not yet:


I'm sitting here at home nursing a real sore back. Fell this morning while packing up to head out for a day at the pistol range. Ice & ibuprofen are my friends right now. When I heal up, I'll post a current walk, instead of this old stuff.

Regards, Guy
Guy, great photos! I should have suspected we had a few fishermen amongst us; usually have the best stories :biggrin:

My dad was fortunate in that he didn't lose me as a fishing partner. He gained my brother in law and my lovely better half who are fishing fools. Courtney goes after them with aggression and is deadly with a filet knife! These aren't the best photos but are a sampling from the past few years.

We taught Courtney the way of the fly rod this trip and she's been hooked ever since. She's got nicer equipment than myself now but that is how it usually goes! Dad is on the far left.




Courtney nailed this monster brown in February about two years ago. He was a 12-13lb body fish in 9lb trim after the spawn.




Girl can work an offshore line, too.




And a little catfish for cookin'. Did I mention she LIKES to clean them? Every man should be so fortunate.

 
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buster 014.JPG buster 015.JPG buster 025.JPG buster 343.JPG buster 425.JPG



well I been living near lots of woods, from tracts of over 50,000 + acre to smaller tracts to some even bigger
I spent most of my days growing up walking my Butt off, exploring, and that need to be outdoooors never left me, I have been taking a walk in the woods almost every day my whole life
when I got my labrador retriever, I think we used to walk about 20 miles a day for the first 8-9 yrs of his life, traveled acros the USA a few times stopping to hike all over, then he got older and got injured in an accident and the walks had to get short, some days a few hundred feet
after he passed it took the thrill out of walking about for me
now a few yrs since he's been gone, I started walking again, but its not the same, seems all the places I go, were places I walked with that dog
we sure did se a lot of things over the yrs, from things we found(air plane propellers to money LOl)
and all teh critters we came up on, and got to enjoy
I think that's what's missing in today's world, folks getting to enjoy the outdoors, far too many people, not just kids spend way too much time indoors if you ask me
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
well I been living near lots of woods, from tracts of over 50,000 + acre to smaller tracts to some even bigger
I spent most of my days growing up walking my Butt off, exploring, and that need to be outdoooors never left me, I have been taking a walk in the woods almost every day my whole life
when I got my labrador retriever, I think we used to walk about 20 miles a day for the first 8-9 yrs of his life, traveled acros the USA a few times stopping to hike all over, then he got older and got injured in an accident and the walks had to get short, some days a few hundred feet
after he passed it took the thrill out of walking about for me
now a few yrs since he's been gone, I started walking again, but its not the same, seems all the places I go, were places I walked with that dog
we sure did se a lot of things over the yrs, from things we found(air plane propellers to money LOl)
and all teh critters we came up on, and got to enjoy
I think that's what's missing in today's world, folks getting to enjoy the outdoors, far too many people, not just kids spend way too much time indoors if you ask me
Nice post! The four legged friends are the most loyal which makes the loss that much tougher. I've always had more than one at a time so they don't let you be upset long. I'd wager your right on the last part, too. Your pup in the creek reminds me of our yellow. Thanks for sharing the photos and memories.
 
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