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I have a strange situation and need more information than Brophy offers.

I recently bought a really, really nice 32-40 in what I thought was an 1893. It does not have the usual Model 1893 on the tang but the "Marlin Safety" is on top of the receiver. The 26" octagonal barrel has the patent dates up to August 1, 1893 and "Special Smokeless Steel" stamping with an 1893 style front blade.

The serial number 55xx (bottom tang) was preceded by what looks like a "C" (with an asterisk filling it in) and Parley Baer identified it as being made in 1915.

However take the stock off and it has a coil spring hammer with the adjustment grooves (exactly as seen and described in the Brophy book). The buttstock and plate are classic 1936 as seen in the book but the forestock is the classic 1893 style with the end cap (in contrast to the "fishbelly" style of the 1936). The fore and buttstocks are matching.

My gunsmith, Mad Dane, believes this is a 1936 that was probably converted by the factory using older parts.

Is this plausible? Did Marlin do these conversions long ago (as they do now)? Is this going to increase it's value?

Dirtwater Doc
 

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I'd be surprised if Marlin put an older barrel on a newer receiver. By the time the model 1936 came on the market, the supply of .32-40 barrels would have been long gone. Almost all the model '93 Marlins built after WWI were .30-30 or .32 Special, so no remaining barrels would have been around to convert with.
I've never seen one, but I'd be more inclined to accept it, if it was a model 1893, with a model 1936, or 36 barrel. This would have been a more likely scenario, if someone had an older gun that needed a newer barrel.
My guess would be that someone had this barrel put on, and then had their bulbous forearm slimmed down to fit the 1893 barrel. Hence the matching wood. If it was well done, there's no way to tell it from factory, after many years together.
There's really no way to prove what was done, so value would be decreased by this swap, unless someone, somehow turns up some rare factory record to prove they did this swap. Most people will assume it is a gunsmith swap, as there's no record of Marlin doing this. Sounds like you have an interesting rifle, which should be a great shooter.
 

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I have a round barrel .30-30 Model 1893 made prior to WWI. Sometime between 1936 and 1990 when I bought it, someone converted it to a 1936-style hammer and coil mainspring.

I also have several brand new Model 1893 .32-40 octagon factory 26" barrels that I purchased from Numrich Gun Parts about 10 years ago for $50 each. None of them have ever been screwed into a gun. Most are Special Smokeless Steel but two are For Blackpowder Only. I have used a couple to replace bad barrels on Model 1893s. They screwed right in and the headspace was dead on. That's pretty darned good tolerances considering when they were made! In the same purchase I also got a 24" 1/2round1/2octagon barrel in .38-55 and a 30" octagon barrel in .32 Win. Spec. that was unmaked as to the cartridge it was chambered for.
 

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Sounds like you're sitting on a gold mine Garth! Those are some really desireable barrel lengths, and contours you've got!
 
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