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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've been a Marlin fancier for just about ever and I own nine Marlin lever action rifles. My dad had a Winchester Model 62 .22 pump that I always liked. I read through my Marlin book and decided that the Marlin Model 37 pump was the .22 of my dreams. I already had a Marlin 39M .22, but a pump would remind me of my dad's neat old Winchester. I wanted a Marlin instead of a Winchester. I looked and searched and inquired (pre-internet days), but never found a Marlin .22 pump of any model in any kind of condition.

Then I went to a CADA gun show. My eyes were focused on .22 caliber pump actions only. I saw tons of Winchesters. Model 1890s, 1906s, and 62s were everywhere. The prices were very high too. I saw Remington pumps as well. Some with hammers, some without. But the Winnys and Remmys did nothing for me. I was going to hold out for a Marlin .22 pump!

In the last row, in the corner was a Marlin 37 on the table. Seriously, the last table at the show! It was in fabulous condition too. I asked if I could examine it and the owner with the table told me to go ahead. I hefted the long, thin rifle. It felt delicate with it's lengthy barrel. The wood was in great shape with some nice grain to the walnut. The butt plate was intact. The blue was beautiful. I asked to check the bore and fished out my battery operated bore light from my pocket. The bore was mint and bright and shiny! Wow. The action worked fine.

The price tag hanging from the trigger guard said $325. Winchesters were three times that price in this 95%+ condition. Remingtons were twice the price. No haggling needed. How do you put a price on a gun that is hard to find? I bought it.

Once I had the gun home, I brought it to a Cowboy Action Shoot where there was a .22 caliber side match. Ten Ritz crackers at 50 feet held by clothespins on a supported 2x4. The winner with the best time hitting the most crackers would get half of the $5 entry fee money paid for the side match. I hit all ten crackers in a hair over 11 seconds with my new/old Marlin 37! I won $25, which in my mind brought the price of the rifle down to just $300.

I just looked on Gunbroker. There are over 300 Winchester 1890, 1906, and 62 pumps for sale on just that gun auction site right now. There are well over 150 Remington .22 pumps on there as well.

There is just one Marlin Model 37.

Going through the Marlin pump .22s in Brophy's Marlin book, there are the 18, 20 (and 20A and 20AS versions), 25/25S, 29/29N, 37 and 47 in exposed hammer guns. There are also Model 32 and 38 hammerless pumps (as well as hammered 27 and 27S in .25-20, .32-20, and .25 Rimfire versions).

Right now, there are a grand total of 2 other Marlin pump action .22 caliber rifles on Gunbroker. That brings the grand total of Marlin .22 pumps, hammer or hammerless, of any model made from 1906 to 1932 to 3!

Wow! Hundreds of other makes and models (we won't even talk about Taurus or Henry pumps!) offered for sale, but very, very few Marlins. And I must say, the three on Gunbroker are in pretty lousy condition too.

So how rare is a Marlin .22 pump? Obviously, on the open market they are very rare. Easily 100 to 1 or even 200 to 1 compared to their old competition (Win and Rem). The serial number on my Model 37 is 1417. Brophy's book states that reported serial numbers for the Model 37 have ranged from a low of 490 to a high of 12255.

We have all heard that "gallery guns" were used rather hard. The advertisement for Marlin's last pump action .22 rifle, the Model 37, stated, "Everybody needs a .22 Repeater - the universal rifle - for rabbits, squirrels, hawks, crows, foxes and all small game and target requirements." These were often working guns and they were far, far from what we now refer to as "safe queens."

Mine has the 24-inch round barrel and the genuine ivory bead front sight with flat top rocky mountain rear sight and is chambered for .22 short, long, and long rifle cartridges.

















 

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Hey MM,

A great looking Model 37!

Good for you!

Later, Mark
 

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She's a beauty, I have a 20A that looks like it. Those Octagon, barrels are to die for. You got that gun for a steal, in that shape around here, you would be paying triple that.
I also have a 25S, 29N, and 4 38's. At work, will discuss how rare they are later.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
















As you can see by the photos of my Marlin, it has a really nicely figured walnut stock. It's even more amazing in person and in the sun! The action is very mechanical and easy to work. I would not say that it is smooth. It goes, "Cuhlunk, clunk!" Unlike a lever action, working the action while the rifle is shouldered does not cause the sights to come off target with an "up and down" motion. That's why I was able to win the .22 side match against all the other .22s...they were lever guns. This slim little .22 pump is easy to shoot and very accurate.

So in conclusion, fellow Marlin Owners, I make the case that the Marlin pump action rifles are just as good (if not better) than their Winchester and Remington brethren. I also believe that the Marlins are much, much, much more difficult to find (in any condition) than the other brands. We all know the reasons why Winchesters command a high price. Of course, this is sort of good for us Marlin fans when we're searching for a particular version of our favorite rifles because they prices are lower. However, I really believe that Marlins should be MORE valuable than the other brands based on rarity.

Of course, we all know that rarity is only one aspect of collectibility. There are plenty of "rare" guns that are still not desirable.

One thing I know for sure is that I feel very lucky to have found this gorgeous Marlin Model 37 pump and that I really enjoy shooting it.
 

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I hope you know, that you can only use Standard velocity ammo. This is one clue as to why the Marlin's are hard to find. The Mag tube is the other.
Feed it properly, and treat it nice, and it will last a lifetime.
 

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Very nice, great Pictures. Thanks for sharing.
 

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mm6mm6,

That is a beauty. Can't wait to hear how it shoots.

I stumbled across a Marlin 37 this week at a local pawn shop, their photo -

Model37_zps13640d9c.jpg

Now it's on layaway. Not nearly as nice as yours, but it's not too bad and the price was too good to pass up.

Neat little rifles. Should make a fun shooter.

B
 

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325 ? don't you feel as if you belong in jail? nice rifle!!!!!!!!
 

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mm6,
You're preaching to the choir buddy. Been searching for a decent Marlin pump for a while now and have concluded that they're scarce as hens teeth (bigger too).
I'd be crowing my head off after finding one as nice as yours. Very nice pick. And speaking of picks. Brian, are you gonna leave anything for the rest of us?
 
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That's a great looking Marlin pump, and as you've discovered they truly are hard to find, especially in that condition! I gave up on Marlin pumps when I was collecting just pump action rifles early on. I could find dozens of Win. and Rem. pumps for every single Marlin pump found. That's a crazy low price too!
 

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Anything and everything I have ever seen in Marlin pump guns are parts guns at best. That is beautiful--------if only we could purchase that quality, new, and off the shelf today.
I have all but given up also---unless I stumble on to one like you did.

Steve
 

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Marlin pumps scarce in NV too. And if I do see them, they have the drug behind the wagon look. Have presumed not many places sold them back in the day.

Marlin seems to have chased the boys rifle market size wise.
 

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Very nice photos and excellent write-up. Guys like you give people Marlinitis. :tee:
 
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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
I was duck hunting today (day three since the season opened) and it got very, very slow later in the morning. So out came the .22s! My buddy had an old High Standard .22 Short "Flite King" semi-auto pistol. It was fun to shoot! I had my 6" S&W 617 revolver and we dinged my steel spinner target with that one too.

But then the real fun came when I removed my Marlin Model 37 from its rifle case. We loaded up .22 Shorts and .22 Long Rifles (old standard velocity ammo) in it and pumped the action. With one round chambered, the Model 37 holds 20 rounds (1 in the chamber and 19 in the magazine tube). Keeping the ivory bead down in the semi-buckhorn rear sight, we couldn't miss.

Here's a slo-mo video recorded with my iPhone 6 in the new slo-mo mode. Kinda fun, be sure your volume is up and look closely at the ejected cases! (Click on the photo below)

 

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Very Good Write up...

Very nice Marlin 37 Pump. It looks like the Model 37A Take Down model.
Yesterday (17 Jan 2015) at a gun show, came across this model that was in pretty good condition. It was displayed on the table (much like your experience, the last table) in the take down and IN IT'S ORIGINAL GUN CASE. (A Suitcase with the original green felt and cartridge boxes from 1929) Bought the rifle for a little more than most are paying for the little pump, $600, but that was because it had it's original presentation suitcase. After we get the rifle cleaned, thoroughly inspected, we will be taking it to the 3J Range and test it out.
I have several Marlins (25 Glenfield Bolt, 60SB Autoloader Stainless, 1894 in .357) but had not considered getting a little .22 Pump, but I am now!
 
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Great write up, great pics, great steal deal!
 

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That's b...ee....aaaa... uuu...teefull!!!!!!
 
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