Marlin Firearms Forum banner
1 - 9 of 9 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
444 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I know that water jugs might not be considered by everyone to be a realistic test, but when compared with other bullets with a known performance on game, I feel that it might give a reasonable perspective.

That being said, I recently shot the factory-loaded Winchester 375gr Dual Bond into lined-up gallon-size water jugs, alongside two additional factory rounds, the Hornady 325gr FTX and Federal 300gr SP. Shot distance was 20 feet (to simulate close-range head-shooting of black bear bayed by hounds).

Left to right in each pic below are the Hornday, the Federal, and the Winchester (2).

Retained weight was 257gr (79%), 282gr (94%), and 375gr (100%) respectively. The Dual Bond mushroom measured nearly 1.25" in diameter (and looked like something out of a science-fiction movie).

The Hornday was captured in the 7th jug, the Federal in the 5th, and the Winchester in the 4th (both times). (In comparison, and assuming that I remember correctly, the factory Rem 405gr SP will pass through 9+ jugs.)

Only the Win 375gr was shot through a chrony. Speed was 1275 fps from my Guide Gun.







I was somewhat surprised that the Hornady penetrated so deeply. I mistakenly thought it was overly soft (although it did shed the most weight). For my aforementioned application, penetration is too much, as hounds on the offside of a bear could be hit by a pass-through.

Based on prior experience, a "5-jug bullet" is about right for bayed bear (passing through both sides of the skull and lodging under the hide on the far side), so the Federal should serve nicely. And regarding the Dual Bond, I would have confidence that it could get the job done without fear of pass-throughs with a good hit.

Of course, a different application might result in a different perspective regarding appropriate bullet choice.


(And forgive me if this type of info has already been shared. I've been away from the forum for a while.)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,559 Posts
WOW Unforgiven, Pretty impressive.

Those rounds should stop a critter, if they get to the boiler room.

The Winchester REALLY looks awesome.

I have seen the damage cause by the FTX on a good sized White Tail Buck, and being a meat hunter I see it as being way over destructive.

I suspect the other two would also not find my favor. Not talking about effectiveness here, but about meat in the freezer.

Being extremely impressed with the results I'm having with a Wide Flat Nose (WFN) 45/70 cast Bullet of 465gr at 1650fps on deer and elk, You might at least consider that option.

Loooooong and deep penetration very effective and deadly and they leave something to eat.

One way or the other, that Winchester round gives an impressive mushroom even if extremely short on penetration.

I'm reminded of the story about I believe it was Larry Kelly, the originator of the EDM - magnport - process for the muzzle breaks on handguns and rifles. Apparently he and his Alaskan Guide were in a cabin one night when a big Brown came to call. Larry had a .44 handgun close by and the guide some other type of firearm, so the bear's visit was cut short. When skinning the critter, they found the jacketed bullets from the .44 had apparently NOT penetrated beyond the fat layer on the bear.

Larry went on to take a big bear with his handgun, as planned, however during the actual hunt he was carrying some type of cast bullet which gave the needed penetration to get the job done.

Expansion can be fantastic and look great, but if it decreases the penetration needed to properly disrupt the vitals, it can be a bad thing.

Thanks for posting, love the images!

Crusty Deary Ol'Coot
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
444 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
.. a Wide Flat Nose (WFN) 45/70 cast Bullet of 465gr at 1650fps on deer and elk, You might at least consider that option.

Loooooong and deep penetration very effective and deadly and they leave something to eat.
Excessive penetration puts hounds at risk (due to the potential of deflected pass-throughs). Meat preservation is of no concern, as head shots are preferred.

As previously mentioned, the application will dictate the preferred bullet performance. I simply wanted to share my findings so that others could make their own educated decisions for their particular application.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,559 Posts
Unforgiven,

As I said earlier, like your post and photographs.

I also understand your concern for the hounds. I have never been in that situation.

Not a hound man.

Not trying to poke holes in your post, and with your need to protect your hounds, we clearly have different goals in mind.

Here in Idaho, we also are required to have the meat processed or be sited for wastage and were I to again hunt for bear it would likely be over bait.

Hounds are too fast and I'm too old.

Thanks for your clarification.

Crusty Deary Ol'Coot
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,554 Posts
I have used those in .452" from my muzzleloader in a sabot. The bullets weigh 260grs and I have recovered 3 weighing 237grs, 228grs and 232grs. They are excellent bullets.


I wish Winchester would offer those for reloading components.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,368 Posts
That is some pretty impressive expansion. I'm thinking that you would have a reasonably good chance of finding on in a deer.

JD338
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,351 Posts
Good tests, and good photos, thank you.

Looks like the win 375 would be a fancy deer bullet. lots of expansion, not a lot of penetration. I see they list the bullet for Elk on the box. not sure its the best load for them or moose.. For bear hunting I want a bullet that can pass thru from any angle, front to back, back to front.
 
1 - 9 of 9 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top