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Ok Martin...I'm intrigued

After reading your story of collecting lead I think I understand this swaging thing....but let me see.

With a swage press do you load some chamber with lead and then use the pressure exerted by the lever to force that lead into a mold for the desired size/weight of bullet? Copper tubing for the jacket? Seems like a way to recycle old bullets and recovered ones if I'm right.
 

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No its just the way jacketed bullets are made. Recycling old and recovered bullets may lead to core inconsistency, which may not be a problem with plinking bullets, but those used for serious work need a consistent core.
 
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This is my work bench or at least part of it and my old GS the press on the left is a richard corbin multi swage hydro and the press on the right is a wallnut hills swage press
the dies in the background are swage dies from .366 to .700 and i use new medical coil lead wire at .99.97 pure.
 

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Herter's used to sell dies, jackets and lead wire to make your own.

Pa do your dies bleed off excess lead?

You need a cup not a tube for jackets.
 

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All kinds. Enamored of their mechanisms!
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Herter's used to sell dies, jackets and lead wire to make your own.

Pa do your dies bleed off excess lead?

You need a cup not a tube for jackets.
I've got a Herter's 9 ton Bullet Maker for .357, and .44. Still have some lead wire and half jackets. Semi wad cutter punches and hollow point. Adjust the length of the punch for various weights. They bleed excess lead from a pin sized hole/vent in the side of the die. Just don't get the die hole misaligned with it's matching hole in the ram! Lot of work, little return. I just can't seem to let it go. Been with me for almost 40 years. AC
 

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Yes the dies have a bleed hole.
the die extrudes lead from the side
first understand that these arnt for making lead bullets pre say
first die is called a core forming die .
second die is called a core set die
3rd is a point forming die
now understand thats only for 3die sets
the first die ..i cut a section of pre measured lead wire.
place that bit into the core forming die and form it.
next i take a preweighed jacket and heat it with flux (ruby red ) the cores are placed in the jackets
and brought up to temp the lead bonds at this point to the jackets (Butch Hairfield ) makes the jackets
Once the lead cools down all the jacketed bullets are placed into a flux removing bath
its almost the as your clean you would use to clean your copper bottom panes
like Tarnex cleaner .
after all that the bullets go into the second die ( core seating ) die
this forces the lead down tightly into the jacket and exenly sets the height for all the run
and next is the point forming die which puts the type of end - point the person wanted
the 4 and 5 and 6 stage dies go on to do other things to the bullets
like adding a rebate type boattail or standered or if a hollow point is in order then i use
a top punch and a different die or if you wanted a two stage core then
only half the lead is inserted and heated and the inside of the copper jacket is rolled down over the
first core and the second core is fluxed and placed into the jacket and heated up again
cleaned and formed .there are many ways to do this.

PaBullets

ps i only use Richard Corbins tooling not darth Daves
 

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i bought my Herter's Super O press with the intent to swage bullets in the future. It has a shifting pivot pin to short stroke it to increase the leverage plus needle bearings in the linkage. I never made any slugs but the press is still doing it's job= reloading.
 

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The reason I was investigating swaging was that the .444 was a new caliber and there were no jacketed slugs other than the 240 grain .44 mag slugs. I just waited several years and bought a 45-70. Plenty of bullet choices for it.
 

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shame i didnt know you back then i could have made you any size/weight you liked in .429 Diam.
even bullets that you would need to throat your barrel for. anything from a 90 grain washer to a 650 grainer
used to be a bulletsmith comp/ called Swage All they made a cute .429 in a baby boattail in a 300 grainer
not much reason to boattail a rock though..
have you thought about getting back into it as a pass time.
 

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Back in the 90's i made a 600 grainer in .458 but it dropped like a rock in the older 45/70's didn't fair much better in the marlin no matter how close you came to max PSI.
but then a bullet Comp/ called Groved bullets came out with a great 400 grain and a better 500 grainer in there design in .458 and the market kinda died for the bigger slugs.
That was about the same time frame as when we started messing around with the conversion in the BLR'S In 300 win mag to 50 action express or they call it the 50/110
we stared making 535 and 550 just for that conversion.
It's the same time that Alaska bullet works started designing there .510 bullet line. big squabble over design infringement.
.
 

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PaBullets57,
@ 67 years and still working I am lucky to get to my little reloading room once a week for a few hours and maybe go to the range four times a year. Your bullet making sounds interesting maybe you should try making some .375 slugs for those of us that have Marlins in that caliber. Fortunately I bought about 200 jacketed 220 grain when I bought the rifle new and I still have a lot of that bunch left plus a Lyman mould and lots of #2 alloy.
 
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