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deermafia, you haven't yet said just how fast you want these to go for your plinking loads.

When I think plinking for my own use, I define it as very modest speeds using cheap bullet and light powder charges for fun shooting. Reasonable but not super accuracy is needed while keeping the load inexpensive and not fatiguing to shoot. Low noise, almost zero recoil.

Just what do you want? How would you define it? Do you know it when you see it and not before, or do you have a specific criteria in mind?

That will help dictate your powder choice and where you go from here.

Anymore, jacketed bullets, even jacketed pistol bullets, are so expensive that even plinking with light powder charges is costly. How about a much cheaper lead bullet? A little more effort with a lead bullet can yield very good results at a big price reduction.

I even hunt deer with them. :)
 

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Plinking equals low cost powder charge, low cost bullet. See what you can find in that regard.

Paying sixteen cents for the bullet alone, another eight to ten cents for the powder charge, three for the primer and about two to three cents per shot for case amortization means about thirty plus cents per shot. That doesn't seem consonant with plinking but rather bankruptcy. :eek:

Economize to the extent possible for plinking. 75 yards means any speed of 22 long rifle equivalent or more is adequate, and small charges of powder and lead bullets will get you there at a cost savings of fifty percent or more.

Surf the web and see how cheap you can go.

Reduced loads mean those cases are not suitable for full power loads if they are shot more than a few times, or you court a head separation.
 

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Problem with that is if there is too much full diameter bearing surface outside of the case when using pistol bullets the typical short throated 336 may not allow the cartridge to chamber fully because the rifling contacts the bullet. Such prevents the lever from closing.

I have one longer throated 336 that will allow longer seated pistol bullets; the other ones won't tolerate it.

As always, when changing how something is done, check to see if the cartridge chambers fully before loading a large batch.

Sessions with the bullet puller and a lot of ammo are to be avoided!

We had a discussion on cartridge overall length and the propensity to jam. In theory, this should not happen as the lifter/tube shouldn't be cartridge length dependent, but in actual practice oftentimes the 35 Remington caliber is sensitive to cartridge length.

I theorize this is because flat nosed bullets allow perfect nose to tail orientation of the cartridge in the tube and do not allow the cutoff portion of the lifter to function as intended. The rub is that the cure (longer OAL) may not allow the cartridge to chamber.

Experiment with feeding to find out for yourself.
 
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