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Discussion Starter #1
Ive been loading ftx bullets in for my 35 remmy with H4895 with good results. Looking to load some rounds for plinking and would like to stay with the same powder if possible. I was looking at Hornady .357 bullets and would like to know the recommended load for these bullets with this powder.
158 HP-XTP
180 HP-XTP

I will be plinking at 75 yards or less. Thanks
Edit: I wanted to add that I have an RCBS FL Die Set and a Lee Classic Cast Press
 

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First H4895 is a bad choice for reduced loads.

8-12 gns of Unique will get you there.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
thanks for the advice, I will pick up a pound and try it out. Anybody else have any others that work well also?
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Swany, could 4895 be used with a normal load with the 158's? If so what sort of load is safe?
 

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Actually H4895 is a decent choice for reduced loads because it can be run at 60% of max. So for a 158 gr load somewhere around 25 gr. should do well.

Also if you have any 2400 around, I get good results with the 158 gr bullets using 18 - 22 grains of 2400. At 22 gr I get a chronographed 2030 fps. 18 gr gets you around 1700 fps.

Check the Hodgdon site under "Data" and Youth Loads for reduced loads using H4895.
 

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deermafia said:
Swany, could 4895 be used with a normal load with the 158's? If so what sort of load is safe?
H4895 and H335 are pretty close in burning rates.

Note that this load should be approached with caution, and it is for the 180gn XTP HP using the data for H335 and a 158gn bullet I would say you could bump it up a little but as always start low and work up.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
thanks, I think I might try the 180g bullet, is the load the same with the 4895 as the 335?
 

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Deermafia, do you have any loading manuals? If not, they should be first on your list of things to buy.

You might also try the Hodgdon website for H4895 loads with 180 grain bullets. I see Hornady doesn't offer load data but their books might. You might also try the other powder manufacturers to see if they list lighter bullets for the 35.
 

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deermafia, you haven't yet said just how fast you want these to go for your plinking loads.

When I think plinking for my own use, I define it as very modest speeds using cheap bullet and light powder charges for fun shooting. Reasonable but not super accuracy is needed while keeping the load inexpensive and not fatiguing to shoot. Low noise, almost zero recoil.

Just what do you want? How would you define it? Do you know it when you see it and not before, or do you have a specific criteria in mind?

That will help dictate your powder choice and where you go from here.

Anymore, jacketed bullets, even jacketed pistol bullets, are so expensive that even plinking with light powder charges is costly. How about a much cheaper lead bullet? A little more effort with a lead bullet can yield very good results at a big price reduction.

I even hunt deer with them. :)
 

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Discussion Starter #10
35 remington:

My thought process is the same as yours, cheap bullet, light charge for fun shooting. I enjoy shooting the rifle but it can get pricey loading it with regular bullets. I have a box of the 158 grain hornady bullets (which I got 100 for $15.99). The furthest I will be shooting the lower powered rounds would be 75 yards. I havent thought about lead bullets, but if its that much cheaper Im game. Thanks again for the advice, and I havent gotten a book yet due to the fact that Im only loading for the 35 at this point, once I start loading for the 270, the 40, and the 45 I'll be making the investment.
 

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Plinking equals low cost powder charge, low cost bullet. See what you can find in that regard.

Paying sixteen cents for the bullet alone, another eight to ten cents for the powder charge, three for the primer and about two to three cents per shot for case amortization means about thirty plus cents per shot. That doesn't seem consonant with plinking but rather bankruptcy. :eek:

Economize to the extent possible for plinking. 75 yards means any speed of 22 long rifle equivalent or more is adequate, and small charges of powder and lead bullets will get you there at a cost savings of fifty percent or more.

Surf the web and see how cheap you can go.

Reduced loads mean those cases are not suitable for full power loads if they are shot more than a few times, or you court a head separation.
 

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deermafia said:
Ive been loading ftx bullets in for my 35 remmy with H4895 with good results. Looking to load some rounds for plinking and would like to stay with the same powder if possible. I was looking at Hornady .357 bullets and would like to know the recommended load for these bullets with this powder.
158 HP-XTP
180 HP-XTP

I will be plinking at 75 yards or less. Thanks
Edit: I wanted to add that I have an RCBS FL Die Set and a Lee Classic Cast Press
YOu might also need a Lee Factory Crimp Die. One of my 35 marlins does not like pistol bullets crimped on the cannelure and will jam with a tube full of cartridges. I need to crimp at something close to the lenth of 200gr corelokt rounds for my 336CS
 

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Problem with that is if there is too much full diameter bearing surface outside of the case when using pistol bullets the typical short throated 336 may not allow the cartridge to chamber fully because the rifling contacts the bullet. Such prevents the lever from closing.

I have one longer throated 336 that will allow longer seated pistol bullets; the other ones won't tolerate it.

As always, when changing how something is done, check to see if the cartridge chambers fully before loading a large batch.

Sessions with the bullet puller and a lot of ammo are to be avoided!

We had a discussion on cartridge overall length and the propensity to jam. In theory, this should not happen as the lifter/tube shouldn't be cartridge length dependent, but in actual practice oftentimes the 35 Remington caliber is sensitive to cartridge length.

I theorize this is because flat nosed bullets allow perfect nose to tail orientation of the cartridge in the tube and do not allow the cutoff portion of the lifter to function as intended. The rub is that the cure (longer OAL) may not allow the cartridge to chamber.

Experiment with feeding to find out for yourself.
 

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35remington said:
Problem with that is if there is too much full diameter bearing surface outside of the case when using pistol bullets the typical short throated 336 may not allow the cartridge to chamber fully because the rifling contacts the bullet. Such prevents the lever from closing.

I have one longer throated 336 that will allow longer seated pistol bullets; the other ones won't tolerate it.

As always, when changing how something is done, check to see if the cartridge chambers fully before loading a large batch.

Sessions with the bullet puller and a lot of ammo are to be avoided!

We had a discussion on cartridge overall length and the propensity to jam. In theory, this should not happen as the lifter/tube shouldn't be cartridge length dependent, but in actual practice oftentimes the 35 Remington caliber is sensitive to cartridge length.

I theorize this is because flat nosed bullets allow perfect nose to tail orientation of the cartridge in the tube and do not allow the cutoff portion of the lifter to function as intended. The rub is that the cure (longer OAL) may not allow the cartridge to chamber.

Experiment with feeding to find out for yourself.
good points.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
I tried out some 158 grain pistol rounds, shot well and no issues with feeding
 
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