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Discussion Starter #41
As I have said before it's the lack of manual safety that is bothersome. Yes keep your finger off the bugger hook. However they usually have a very light trigger. Who in their right mind would carry your bolt action rifle around loaded without the safety on? Any movement at all of that trigger while its in your holster pointed at the jewels are very nerve racking. A cocked and locked 1911 is much more safer IMHO.
 

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Striker fired pistols have whats called a "striker block". This striker block (blocks the actual guns firing pin!) completely prevents any chance of any round ever being fired until the striker block is disengaged. This striker block is disengaged ONLY BY PULLING THE TRIGGER. EVERY striker fired gun is built this way. Meaning? ....the gun will NEVER FIRE EVER until you pull that trigger, PERIOD
A "striker block" is not a safety. Carrying a loaded striker fired pistol is just like carrying a fully cocked revolver. The "striker block" doesn't provide any more safety than you get fron a "hammer block" in a revolver. I do not carry revolvers with the hammer back and, for the same reason, I do not carry striker fired pistols.
 

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My fault, I have done a poor job of explaining how a striker fired gun works, mainly because there are SO MANY variations. MANY striker fired guns are NOT FULLY COCKED until you PULL THE TRIGGER. You are not carrying around a gun with a round in the chamber and a 2.5lb 30-06 style trigger at all.

MANY striker fired pistols DO HAVE a full external safety, similar to the beloved 1911, along with a trigger safety that will not allow the trigger to be pulled until depressed. These all work in tandem with each other to produce a very safe to carry firearm. For me, I would NEVER carry a cocked and locked 1911, THAT is a hair trigger relying on a big safety lever to keep you from blowing your leg off, I carry mine hammer down, I am very comfortable with carrying the double action over the single.

On the above "many variations" comment.... there are quite a few striker fired pistols out there where the trigger pull is LONG AND HARD, just like a double action revolver, the Kahr brand comes to mind. It has a long strong trigger pull, yet is striker fired. My point? There is a striker fired handgun made out there to suit EVERYONE'S taste. I can guarantee I can blindfold you and put a striker fired trigger on your finger that you will swear is a double action hammer fired revolver until you take the blindfold off and see it for yourself.

I'm not dumb enough yet to try and convince anyone to change their mind on what they like or dis-like, but everyone that reads this thread should at least know what is available out there for THEM to research and decide whats best for them.

DR
 

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A "striker block" is not a safety. Carrying a loaded striker fired pistol is just like carrying a fully cocked revolver. The "striker block" doesn't provide any more safety than you get fron a "hammer block" in a revolver. I do not carry revolvers with the hammer back and, for the same reason, I do not carry striker fired pistols.
Striker pistols are not fully cocked. You actually cock it when you pull the trigger. 1911 models cannot be fired unless the hammer is cocked. They are carried cocked and rely on several safety devices to prevent an accidental discharge. The only safety I need to rely on is the one between my ears.
 

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Yes, there are variations. But in general, the kind of mechanism most people are referring to as "striker fired" is the mechanism Glock made famous. In those pistols, the firing pin spring is compressed as the slide moves forward. The firing pin is held back with the spring under tension, i.e. the pistol is cocked. It remains cocked until the trigger is pulled, releasing it.

 

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Most of us old revolver and 1911 guys prefer a hammer pistol, but I have no qualms about carrying my PC Shield or fullsize M&P chambered.
Both of mine have thumb safeties, but I only use them for holstering. Once the pistol is in the holster, the small safety comes off.

One big advantage of a striker fired pistol is a much lower slide to hand axis, which equates to less muzzle flip and perceived recoil.
Getting back on target quicker is a good thing. Check out the pic comparing an M&P slide with the massive H&K USP slide.
 

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Yes, there are variations. But in general, the kind of mechanism most people are referring to as "striker fired" is the mechanism Glock made famous. In those pistols, the firing pin spring is compressed as the slide moves forward. The firing pin is held back with the spring under tension, i.e. the pistol is cocked. It remains cocked until the trigger is pulled, releasing it.

Thank you for making my point. Watch the video and notice that by pulling the trigger you are pulling back the striker, in effect "cocking" it. The striker remains uncocked as long as the trigger isn't pulled.
 
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If one prefers a hammer and low bore axis, CZ or EAA Witness, actually a number of handguns offer it as so many brands have copied the CZ's.

Jack
 

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Thank you for making my point. Watch the video and notice that by pulling the trigger you are pulling back the striker, in effect "cocking" it. The striker remains uncocked as long as the trigger isn't pulled.
Thank you Bobshouse, saved me the trouble. :smokin:

Until you disassemble and reassemble many variations of handguns and rifles, you really just don't understand how they all operate.

DR
 

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Maybe I'm misunderstanding your terminology. Maybe I'm not very good at explaining things.

In a cocked revolver the hammer is to the rear and under pressure from a compressed spring. The hammer would slam forward if it were not physically prevented from doing so by the sear. Pulling the trigger moves the sear out of the way, allowing the hammer to fall.

Likewise, in the loaded Glock, the firing pin (striker) is to the rear and under pressure from a compressed spring. The firing pin would slam forward if it were not physically prevented from doing so by the trigger bar. Pulling the trigger moves the trigger bar out of the way, allowing the firing pin to strike the cartridge.

Those are the similarities I was trying to explain between carrying a cocked revolver and a loaded, and thereby cocked, Glock. Both are ready to go with a simple, light pull on the trigger and no safety other than protecting or controlling the trigger to prevent a discharge.
 

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Maybe I'm misunderstanding your terminology. Maybe I'm not very good at explaining things.

In a cocked revolver the hammer is to the rear and under pressure from a compressed spring. The hammer would slam forward if it were not physically prevented from doing so by the sear. Pulling the trigger moves the sear out of the way, allowing the hammer to fall.

Likewise, in the loaded Glock, the firing pin (striker) is to the rear and under pressure from a compressed spring. The firing pin would slam forward if it were not physically prevented from doing so by the trigger bar. Pulling the trigger moves the trigger bar out of the way, allowing the firing pin to strike the cartridge.

Those are the similarities I was trying to explain between carrying a cocked revolver and a loaded, and thereby cocked, Glock. Both are ready to go with a simple, light pull on the trigger and no safety other than protecting or controlling the trigger to prevent a discharge.
But where your wrong is that the glock striker isn't under pressure until you pull the trigger. The act of pulling the trigger causes the striker to pull back until it is released.
 
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But where your wrong is that the glock striker isn't under pressure until you pull the trigger. The act of pulling the trigger causes the striker to pull back until it is released.
The Glock striker is under compressed spring tension and nearly all the way to the rear before the trigger is depressed. In pulling the trigger the striker is pulled back only a small additional amount in order for it to clear the firing pin safety. It's pulled back just enough for that and no further. Once the safety moves to allow a clear path for the striker, the striker is released.
 

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All my Glocks came with triggers in the 6-7lb range. Granted it’s not 14lbs and a mile long like a DA revolver but you can’t just bump a 6lb trigger and make it fire.

A friend is a big 1911 guy and most of his guns have light 2.5-3lbs triggers, they came that way. He’s a cocked and locked guy, safety make’m safe ya know. He drug out his 1911 he’d carried all day and showed it to me, loaded, cocked and the safety off, carried it all day like that. In and out of the car, bumping into people as he passed them at his job, all day loaded, hammer back and the safety off.

He carries a Glock now.
 

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That's the "not recommended" way to carry a 1911!

Sure ain’t.

He either dropped the slide and stuck it in his holster without engaging the safety or thumped, bumped and adjusted it and knocked it off safe at some point, he couldn’t answer the question of why on the...... would he carry a 1911 cocked and the safety not engaged.
 

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Discussion Starter #59
Sure ain’t.

He either dropped the slide and stuck it in his holster without engaging the safety or thumped, bumped and adjusted it and knocked it off safe at some point, he couldn’t answer the question of why on the...... would he carry a 1911 cocked and the safety not engaged.
Still have to engage the grip safety to fire. I wouldn't carry that way but even with just the grip safety engaged you couldn't accidentally pull the trigger unless it was depressed. Still safer than a striker with no safety.
 

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He wasn’t carrying that way on purpose, he forgot to engage the safety or knocked it off.


You made mention of not wanting a cop pointing a Glock at you earlier, how would you feel about this 1911 that he thought the safety was on but it wasn’t in a tense situation. I personally don’t want any gun pointed at me.

I would not want to be in a room with a guy that unholsters a 1911 cocked and ready, light trigger because when it comes out your hand engages that safety on the grip, it doesn’t take much to get a 2.5lb trigger to go. I say absolutely not safer than a striker fired.


Keeping your finger off the trigger works regardless if it’s striker fired, single action or a match lock. Being careless is dangerous no matter what you’re packing.


There’s a guy that frequents a local gun shop that hates striker fired guns, he’s afraid they’ll just go off. He carries a with a cold chamber, hammer down, safety on in a holster with a top strap that holds his gun in place.


You see and hear strange things around gun people.
 
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