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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Thought I'd post this, in case someone else ever has a similar problem.
A friend brought a model 12 Win. stock over today. He's was going to refinish it, and saw what looked like an imperfection near the wrist on one side. When he started sanding it, a hole broke through the side! Seems the fellas at Winchester got off track while boring for the stock throughbolt, and nearly came out the left side! It's quite a hole, being about 1" long by 1/2" wide, and triagular shaped.
He wanted to see if I could fix it, or find another stock. After looking it over pretty well, I decided we might fix it, and make it unseen for the most part. I found another old broken stock, with similar walnut, and cut a small piece out of it, trying to match the grain. I did a rubbing of the hole size and shape, with a soft lead pencil and white paper. I then transfered the rubbing to the small piece of scrap wood. After that I cut the piece out, staying a little oversized. With a file I worked the piece down until it almost fit the hole. I then wrapped a piece of steel tubing with masking tape, until it just fit inside the stock throughbolt hole. I covered the tape with paste wax, to prevent sticking, and pushed it into the stock, until it covered the hole inside. I then put wood glue on the patch, and tapped the repair piece into the hole. It is a very close fit, but after drying overnite, it does have a few small imperfections around the edge. I sanded the patch down close to flush, and using more wood glue, I mixed the dust into the glue, and forced it into the imperfections. After a couple hours of drying, I rough sanded it down flush, and the result is a patch that is almost invisible!
I'll take it back to my friend tonight, and he can continue his restoration of the rest of the stock.
Hope this helps anyone who might have a similar situation sometime.
 

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This is a good fix as I've done afew stocks before and liked the way they came out.

QUESTION MM93...........
After sanding stock down and getting most of old finish off. Using sanding sealer and sanding afew times what can be put on to give that (SHINY) finish?Is there a can spray or oil rubbed? What to get that shiny fiish back? All I've done are satin oil type finish and then wax. I just picked up a Winnie#70-338Win.Mag and the stock has some blemished in the outer finish and afew gouges which I know can get out with iron. The shine is the mistery?

SpikeMaster49 8) :lol: 8) :lol: 8) :lol:
 

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Tru-Oil gives a tough finish that can be left glossy or hand rubbed to the satin finish of your choice. Tung oil gives excellent results in the same fashion. I have done 4 or 5 stocks with tung oil and hand rubbed them for a satin finish. MM93 should be able to help you more as he has done much more woodwork than I! At this point, I have enough woodworking knowledge to make myself dangerous! I am in the process of finishing my first semi-inletted stock for a Model 1893. It has been a learning experience! Good luck.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Roundsworth is right. Tru Oil does give a nice shiny finish, if it's not sanded or dulled. There are things like polyurethane finishes that also give a high gloss shine, but they usually result in a finish that is tough to keep looking good, as shiny finishes chip and marr easily.
I use Permalyn Sealer exclusively any more, as it is easy to control the amount of sheen. Permalyn also goes over any remnants of the old finish, and never has a problem drying properly. It may take up to 12 coats to get a high glossy shine on raw wood, but that's what I like about it, because it builds up so slowly. It's watery thin, so it penetrates well, and is easily touched up, if your stock has an accident. I usually stop when it gets to a "hand rubbed oil" look, as I prefer a satin look, over a high gloss.
I don't use sanding sealer with Permalyn either, as it is a sealer and finish. I generally apply a few heavy coats, wet sanding them into the finish. This works to fill all the little pores in the wood, with what would normally be wood dust, so the finish seals and fills. After the first few coats, I simply wipe the sealer on, and let it sit, then wipe the excess off about 10 minutes later. When it gets to the proper sheen I want, I let it dry 24 hrs. and then finish sand it with 600-800 grit.
For that really lustrous finish, I hand rub it with Minn Wax paste after it's dried for about one month. This will bring the sheen up slightly, and get the stock ready for the inclement weather.
Hope this helps.
 

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THANKS::
Roundsworth and Marlinman93

I'm gonna play with the tru-oil way and the Parmylan way. Have afew pieces of different type woods to try out on. Heres another question-Where do I find Parmylan? I am sure I have spelled this wrong so I'll look at the web again to get the spelling.Thanks again for afew different ways to try this stock finishing fellows.

SpikeMaster49 8) :lol: 8) :lol: 8) :lol: 8) :lol:
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
The only place I know that sells Permalyn is Brownells. It's not cheap, at about $20 a pint, if I remember right.
 
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