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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi all,

I have a 1894 in 44 Mag. The birth year is 2001 if I read the ser. # correctly. Anyway, I had someone tell me recently that the stock on my gun is birch, not walnut, and as a result is somehow a less worthy gun, and possibly a non-stock, stock.

So my question is, did Marlin make these with birch stocks? And if so, does that make it a "red-headed step-child" compared to a "real" walnut-stocked Marlin?

Thanks for your insight/opinions, I was feeling pretty pleased with this gun until now.:(
 

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I have never seen a Marlin 44 Mag with a birch stock. If it has a Marlin bullseye in the buttstock--it has to be walnut.
 

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So, it sounds like it's just a variation, similar to the "Glenfield" Marlins? Although it does have all the Marlin markings, including the "JM" stamp that I have read is desirable….
 

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I have not seen any 1894's that were Birch. If it is birch the wood is actually very light and would have to be stained with a red or brn Walnut color. The inside areas would be white. Nothing wrong with a Birch stock. You can always upgrade it with a custom Walnut set and use the Birch for hunting or cowboy shoots.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I looked at the threads mentioned above, and that is what mine looks like. I can post pics, if it matters.

Cowboy23*, can you recommend a reliable place to get walnut stocks for the 1894? I'm not stuck on having the walnut, I think the birch looks fine, but it's nice to have options!
 

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firstbassman:
I'm building a project rifle,and I'm in the market for wood. If you get walnut,and want to sell the birch stock and forearm,I'd buy them to help you finance the walnut. If you're interested,shoot me a PM. Thanks.

Rob
 

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As Troy correctly said, marlin did make 1894's with birch stocks. The bullseye, or lack of, will tell you right away. It is a JM Marlin in every way and yes, it is like a Glenfield or the more recent 336A's and W's. If it is a using gun, don't sweat it for a second. Birch is an excellent and durable gun stock it just isn't as pretty as walnut. And ya won't care so much if you scratch it. ;)
 

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Hi all,I have a 1894 in 44 Mag. The birth year is 2001 if I read the ser. # correctly. Anyway, I had someone tell me recently that the stock on my gun is birch, not walnut, and as a result is somehow a less worthy gun, and possibly a non-stock, stock.So my question is, did Marlin make these with birch stocks? And if so, does that make it a "red-headed step-child" compared to a "real" walnut-stocked Marlin?Thanks for your insight/opinions, I was feeling pretty pleased with this gun until now.:(
Yes, there were birch-stocked 1894s, locally they were retailed by Big 5 Sports stores for 4-5 years in the "off-season" until there WAS no "off-season" in spring-summer, don't know if they were sold elsewhere by other chains. At that time, the original advertised price was $195, gun show price for new Marlins was $450-500 for anything on the table. They are in no way "seconds", just have hardwood instead of walnut stocks. There's no difference in serials, nothing added or subtracted mechanically. It's as carefully finished as any other gun off the production line. I have one, I've shot maybe 50 deer with it since I got it, none of them complained about the stock. If it shoots well, don't fuss about the stock, if not, then the stock doesn't matter at all. Chances are a replacement won't fit nearly as well as the original, unless you're prepared to sand it flush with the action in place, separate the two and reblue the action. That's the way it was done at the factory, sanded to match before finishing. Since these are low-production variants, they might just be worth extra to a collector some day. If there's no bullseye in the butt, the stock is either a replacement or it's hardwood. You can pull the tang screw, separate the receiver and see if the wood is white in the inletting. Marlin never finished the inletting on any of their guns. The birch stock is perfect for a hunting gun, there's not as much concern if it gets scratched up going through brush.Stan S.
 

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Heres what I know because I own various models. At some point Marlin stopped putting the "bullseye" on their walnut 94 stocks, I have several of these recent ones with no bullseye. On newer models with checkering I can say there are at least four types of variations. The blued models I've found are brown or a light golden pecan look, walnut not birch. The Stainless models are a redish tint brown. I even have a SS without bullseye and its a pretty piece of walnut.

The only birch I've seen on 94's is stained a real dark brown with very little graining. The only lighter tone birch I've seen is on the 336.

So what I'm trying to say is, the bullseye is not a good indicator on the recent 94's as to whether its walnut.

You have to know your wood. The "pecan" toned versions I have are absolutely beautiful with pretty grain and I'd almost swear it to be pecan but its walnut.

I have some of the smooth stock 70's and 80's versions too. They have bullseyes. My CB has a bullseye with a slightly slimmer stock.

I'm quite the gunaholic and my business routes take me past hundreds of gunstores here in Texas, Louisianna, Arkansas, and Oklahoma and I've seen tons of 94's. I think there might be more of these guns here than anywhere in the world?
 

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I have never seen a Marlin 44 Mag with a birch stock. If it has a Marlin bullseye in the buttstock--it has to be walnut.
Mine has a Birch stock. One thing I did not notice when buying it of Armslist. Kind of disappointed but it still shoots and functions fine. More disappointed in the Marlin oversize bore.
DSCN0605.JPG
 

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Mine will stay birch. If I were to replace the stocks with walnut it would have to be real cheap or I would do it from the plank. I and OP would be better off selling and buying a walnut stocked gun then going with any of the replacement wood. I don't know what he paid but mine would not be worth the cost.
 
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