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I've got an older 336CS with checkered stock and forend that has some really beautiful wood on it, but has some scratching and dings. I thought about refinishing myself, but also thought it'd be nice to get it done by someone who really knows what they are doing. Any recommendations on stock refinishers? Maybe from previous experirnce. Thanks
 

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Isn't really hard. Just strip off the old finish, wash well with warm soapy water, rinse and dry it well, sand lightly as needed, then soak it down good with a 50/50 mix of boiled linseed oil and turpentine, wiping off excess. Do a few coats. Some like to buff with 0000 steel wool when dry. That's what I do anyway.

If the checkering needs touching up or recutting, that's another story though. Requires special tools and patience I don't have.
 

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I've got an older 336CS with checkered stock and forend that has some really beautiful wood on it, but has some scratching and dings. I thought about refinishing myself, but also thought it'd be nice to get it done by someone who really knows what they are doing. Any recommendations on stock refinishers? Maybe from previous experirnce. Thanks
I refinished the majority of my rifle stocks. As has been previously stated, it's not a hard job, it just takes some time and patience.
I like several coats of Tung Oil followed by Minwax paste wax. It gives a semi gloss finish that makes the woods character stand out. It usually takes me an hour to strip the wood and a day to let it dry. Then I apply the Tung Oil, 1 coat a day for several days or until I get the colorization I like. Once dry apply the wax and buff to a polish.
Andrew
 

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I use Citristrip...works great!
 

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I use Birchwood Casey Tru-oil for all of my stock refinishing. Never given me any trouble in any of the jobs I have undertaken. Just follow the instructions on the label for a top quality finish.

I've had bad experiences using boiled Linseed oil and turpentine. The boiled linseed oil tends to stay 'tacky' for quite some time after it is applied (even in very small amounts), and the mixture tends to darken the wood over time.
 

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If you REALLY want a hardcore, old-school gunstock finish, get some of this and follow the directions. Patience required.
 

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Old school look is easiest with leather dye. Here is a checkered modern Mossberg 410 I made "look old" (color-wise, it's not beat up).

Here in fluorescent lighting
90-D17-CEF-D712-4825-A96-C-BA863408-FB6-B.jpg

Here in sunlight
FD169-B79-4-EA1-4-DDA-8-F9-C-27-F1228-E0-DBB.jpg


9270-DFB4-1-D04-4-A89-80-B1-615-CF12217-F4.jpg
 
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