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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Has any one sent a gun back to Marlin because they were not happy with the fit of the stock?

I bought my Marlin 1894, 44 Mag, about six months ago and noticed when I got it that the fit of the stock wasn’t perfect but not too bad. Well after six months “not too bad” is all I notice when handling or shooting the gun. So should I send it back to Marlin or just sent it to a third party?

Is this a warranty issue or my problem because I bought the gun when I should have put it back on the shelf and looked at another one?

Thanks, Scott
 

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I dont think they could do any better if you sent it back right now anyways. If it were me Id either give it to a good woodsmith or tinker with it myself.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks for getting back to me. I thought a woodsmith wound be the way to go but I was hopping Marlin would want to make it right. Since I'm going to be paying for it myself, I think I'll see about having the checkering removed for the old school look.
 

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I purchased a few new Marlins last year that have wood fitting problems. Just about all that I have seen the last couple years have have some sort of "inletting issues" that you would think the factory would not let ship, but quality is not #1 anymore.
I ended up sending an 1895SBL back to the factory December 2010 because of a poorly fitted stock and a swivel stud mounted off to the side and so crooked that I could not believe it. It also had a problem with the front sight and needed to be replaced. I was very reluctant to send it back, but I figured it was the best option to see what would come of it. (I bought the gun off of GB and it was not the one pictured in the auction, but I later found out that they already sold the one pictured in the auction) (Note to anyone using GB: be sure and first ask if the gun pictured is the one you are buying -I always learn the hard way!)
I received the gun back about 2 wks. from the day I shipped it out. They replaced the front sight and the buttstock. The buttstock is much better than the original one, with the swivel stud being straight and the fit to the receiver is better, but still needs improvement. It looks like the days of a properly fitted buttstock from Marlin are long gone.
I have some new walnut stocked Marlins that I would like to have the buttstocks replaced with properly inletted ones, but I am just not ready to take the chance sending them back to Marlin. I think that with some work with some inletting chisels, one could get the fit much better around the tang and receiver area. One of the problems that I can see on some of mine is that there is high wood in some areas and this creates a problem with the finish and checkering. It looks to me like the only solution is to inlet the stock properly, re-checker (if checkered from the factory), and refinish.
Quality control is just not what it used to be at Marlin.
 

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Marlin made their stocks in-house when they were still in CT.

Now that they are at the Remington facility in NY, the stocks have been outsourced.

You can call Marlin/Remington and they should send you a replacement stock. They did for my 1895CB but be warned, there's a good chance the replacement won't be any better. Mine wasn't. ::)
 

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Jayhawkhuntclub said:
Any chance we could get some pics of these poorly fitted stocks? Thanks.








Large scratch...


It also had to of been put on with a mallet as it would not budge when I went to change it out. It took me an hour and a LOT of work and choice words to get it off of there. Then I spent four hours re-working the inletting on the replacement stock because it would not fit on the rifle.

And don't get me started on the shoddy bluing, scratches, and dents...
 

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I'd say live with it considering where Marlin is right now, but you could get a better fit on your ends yourself. Where the stock ends at the receiver you can tighten that joint up real nice with relative ease. You will have to extend the dado that the tangs fit in only at the rounded end. This can be accomplished with a in channel gouge or regular gouge with a real tight curve.
There is really nothing you can do in the width of the machined wood (side of tangs) it won't grow the extra wood!
Unfortunately, Marlin just isn't making the quality wood to metal finish the way they used to. China could do a better job unfortunately. :( :'( :mad:
As long as it shoots ok and has the JM proof on the barrel, keep it.
 

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Get some Arcaglass Gel. Mix a little of the brown color in it to match the staock and follow the directions. You will then have a perfectly inletted stock and it will be nicely bedded to boot. Cheaper than the shipping back to marlin, and you get a nice bedding job too.

I would say it probably adds more value to your Marlin as well, especially since what I see in teh picture isn't any worse than my 44 Mag, 357 CB, or my 45-70.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Thanks for all the great information. After reading all the replies and doing a good bit of web research I think I’m going to try to correct the stock fit my-self. Most of my displeasure is that this wood is not flush to the stock so the problem is sanding it down to fit level with the tang. If I take it slow and recheck the fit often I should be set. I was thinking about going with a True-oil finish, I still have time to make that decision. Between work and the family this could take a couple of weeks but that’s not a big deal. After I finish that project I was thinking about send it off for a new finish.

Thanks again for all the great information but be warned, more stupid questions to follow.

Scott

Go Packers
 

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STM said:
Thanks for all the great information. After reading all the replies and doing a good bit of web research I think I’m going to try to correct the stock fit my-self. Most of my displeasure is that this wood is not flush to the stock so the problem is sanding it down to fit level with the tang. If I take it slow and recheck the fit often I should be set. I was thinking about going with a True-oil finish, I still have time to make that decision. Between work and the family this could take a couple of weeks but that’s not a big deal. After I finish that project I was thinking about send it off for a new finish.

Thanks again for all the great information but be warned, more stupid questions to follow.

Scott

Go Packers
Do some research before you begin. Scroll down to the Gunsmithing forum, I believe in the Woord Working section and find a post by Leverdude about Bedding a Stock.

I don't know how much you need to remove to get things flush but you don't want to end up with your tang bolt hole misaligned.

There is also a thread in there on refinishing stocks (under my name).

NEVER hesitate to ask questions around here! That's what this forum is all about. :)
 

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STM said:
Thanks for all the great information. After reading all the replies and doing a good bit of web research I think I’m going to try to correct the stock fit my-self. Most of my displeasure is that this wood is not flush to the stock so the problem is sanding it down to fit level with the tang. If I take it slow and recheck the fit often I should be set. I was thinking about going with a True-oil finish, I still have time to make that decision. Between work and the family this could take a couple of weeks but that’s not a big deal. After I finish that project I was thinking about send it off for a new finish.

Thanks again for all the great information but be warned, more stupid questions to follow.

Scott

Go Packers
If its just high you can scribe a line with the stock mounted & remove material until the line is just barely showing. Its good to leave the wood slightly proud (high) of the metal. If you need it to slide in more thats not hard either but can get tedious. Its often hard to determine just whats holding it back. Get some inletting black, or lipstick works too. Apply it to the metal around the tangs & where the wood will abut the metal. Then slide the stock on & you should be able to see where it makes first contact with the metal. Remove just enough to erase the mark & try again. Doing it like that you can get it VERY snug. Or you can just get it as close as you like and then bed it with acraglass to get a perfect fit. Beyond asthetics a perfect fit prevents any wobble or movement at all, always a good thing if you care about acuracy. I generally bed any stock I fiddle with. Most of the time you almost dont even need the screw it gets such a perfect fit.
 
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