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About five or six years ago, I wondered the same thing. I bought one of each and installed them in my 1894's. After thousands and thousands of rounds both are functioning perfectly. I used the stock hammer spring, no sense chancing a misfire from a reduced power spring. The titanium firing pin got some bad reviews, but I don't see why. The US Government specifies titanium firing pins in their specs for handguns submitted for testing. My titanium pin works great. So does the steel pin.
While not statistically significant, my example of two rifles is success with either. You do lose the safety feature of the two piece firing pin, but that is a personal choice. I like the simplicity of one piece pins better, less moving parts to malfunction.
I'm sure other members will respond.
 

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last year i bought my wife a spring field EMP 1911 in 9mm, half the time certain brands of primers were not struck hard enough to detonate, a lot of misfires. i did some research and found these guns all had titanium firing pins. the reason, because of some left wing do gooder law, incase the gun was dropped it wouldn't go off! the titanium is real light and does not have enough force to set off some of the tougher primers. i had to pay for a steel firing pin so the gun would work! after i put in the pin the gun works every time. stay away from titanium if you want your gun to shoot every time,,,,,,,,,,,
 

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I fitted a one piece firing pin, steel. The reason was simply that I liked the idea of one piece instead of three. I think its three? Less to go wrong, less to get grit in. I am with rob02049 there. Not that the split design is bad, its not. I just feel less parts are better.

Some would argue the split firing pin is a safety and if uncomfortable loosing that, dont go one piece. Anyway, there is the manual cross bolt safety, locking block and that one most of us have between the ears.

Cant comment on titanium, not sure what they cost and whether any advantage is worth it. What is the advantage? Weight?
 

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I believe there was a old thread here or perhaps on a another forum where someone had blown their rifle up after installing a one piece firing pin.
Following the thread it appeared they may have reassembled the rifle without the locking block.
I think the old Marlins had Marlin Safety engraved on top of the receiver which was referring to that two piece firing pin?
 

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I went with the one-piece pin during the darkest days of Remington ownership. I had a rear firing pin break, and the little flat spring that pushes the rear pin down was also broken. After replacing both with factory (Ilion) parts, the new rear pin broke only two weeks later. I ordered a one piece steel pin from Longhunter, installed it, and have sent a zillion rounds downrange with no problems. My other 1894 is a high round count rifle. Before all the crazy prices took over, I shot 150-200 rounds per week. In a few years you can rack up some big numbers. So this rifle had 20,000 or 25,000 rounds fired and I figured to change out the firing pins as preventative maintenance. Got the titanium pin, same price as the steel pin and installed it. No complaints here.
Another beef I have with the stock Marlin setup is the vertical cut in the front pin that retains the flat spring. A crack will develop there on rifles that get shot a lot. I had this happen, too. The one-piece pin eliminates this cut.
In the final analysis, it's personal choice. As a lifelong Professional Mechanic, I favor fewer parts and simpler designs. The titanium pin in my 1894 fires every time, a Marlin rifle is not a 1911 pistol.
 

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I thought the two/three piece firing pin would not let it fire out of battery which is possible with the one pin design. Not sure but I thought about a one piece at one time then I thought again that the original design is functioning perfectly and safe so why mess with it. I am probably wrong on the firing out of battery possibilities and probably should notr have commented.
 

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None. It is a solution to a problem that doesn't exist. JM got the design right a long time ago but the aftermarket guys are more than eager to take your money.
I concur! No need for a lightweight in a 100 year old design to light the firing pin.

Now, with a 1911 .45acp may be a different deal. A lightweight floating firing pin slamming slamming the slide in an a pistol would be made safer with a lightweight firing pin for sure.

AC
 

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last year i bought my wife a spring field EMP 1911 in 9mm, half the time certain brands of primers were not struck hard enough to detonate, a lot of misfires. i did some research and found these guns all had titanium firing pins. the reason, because of some left wing do gooder law, incase the gun was dropped it wouldn't go off! the titanium is real light and does not have enough force to set off some of the tougher primers. i had to pay for a steel firing pin so the gun would work! after i put in the pin the gun works every time. stay away from titanium if you want your gun to shoot every time,,,,,,,,,,,
Titanium firing pins have some use to decreasing lock time in target rifles. Beyond that they are a solution looking for a problem.

I've not had any problems with my (titaniun firing pin) EMP igniting any brand of primer or ammo.

BUT... It will cause the center of some primers to punch out into the firing pin channel, blocking the firing pin. The titanium pin does not stay in the primer indent long enough for the max internal pressure to dissipate.
 

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I had a problem last week with my firing pin. I fired and the hammer just fell, no bang. Took out the cartridge, no dent on the primer. Tried again, same result. Then I tried it a third time, but with the safety off.
Ru-Roe! Hope it wasn't a life or death scenario ! AC
 

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I thought the two/three piece firing pin would not let it fire out of battery which is possible with the one pin design. Not sure but I thought about a one piece at one time then I thought again that the original design is functioning perfectly and safe so why mess with it. I am probably wrong on the firing out of battery possibilities and probably should notr have commented.
It's the locking block that pushes up the rear piece of the 2 piece firing pin so it's in line with the front part of the firing pin. With the two piece if the rifle is taken apart and then put back together without the locking block it won't fire with a one piece firing pin it will. No locking block rifle fires the whole bolt assembly is coming out the back of the receiver.
 

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I put a 1 piece firing pin in my cowboy action 1894. With lighter springs all around to reduce levering resistance and a happy trigger to lighten trigger pull, I found I did not get 100% ignition on all types of primers. With less resistance in the 1 piece pin I got 199 % ignition with all primers. Because of the safety issue of the replaced pin, I don't hunt with it any more. I use the 308 XLR or 35 Rem waffletop instead.
 

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If you have the titanium 1894 firing pin and want 100% reliability, keep the stock hammer spring. Do not use a lightened spring, you may experience misfires. There's very little advantage in lightened trigger pull and ease of levering gained by using a lighter spring.
To test your titanium pin, load up some .44 Mags with Federal 155 or CCI 350 large pistol magnum primers. If you get consistent ignition with these two, the hardest cups available in pistol primers, you're good to go. The CCI 350 cup is particularly hard.
This thread caught my interest, so I went out back and ran a couple magazines through my 1894 with the titanium pin. All was normal. Firing pin indentations sharp and well defined. A very accurate rifle, better than my old eyesight.
 

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I switched to a one piece (steel) firing pin when after replacing the original (Broken ) I could not get it to reliably fire. I polished I tweaked I replaced the rear flat spring no improvement. the single piece so far is much better. The rifle is a marlin 36 made in 1947 and was fairly badly mistreated before me
my guess is the titanium is ideal for Cowboy action shooters who dry fire and live fire 1000s of times/yr . Titanium is super tough and probably won't break , which is a big advantage in competitions
 

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last year i bought my wife a spring field EMP 1911 in 9mm, half the time certain brands of primers were not struck hard enough to detonate, a lot of misfires. i did some research and found these guns all had titanium firing pins. the reason, because of some left wing do gooder law, incase the gun was dropped it wouldn't go off! the titanium is real light and does not have enough force to set off some of the tougher primers. i had to pay for a steel firing pin so the gun would work! after i put in the pin the gun works every time. stay away from titanium if you want your gun to shoot every time,,,,,,,,,,,
Do they do that with all 1911's? I bought a Springfield 1911 Mil-Spec 45 a couple of years ago. Haven't had a FTF yet.
 
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