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Just opened the fridge and spied a nice bone-in ribeye in there, and it got me to thinkin'.

First, who here prefers dry-aged to wet-aged beef, and vice versa? What are the advantages and disadvantages of each?

Second, why is grass-fed beef seemingly getting more popular? I was raised in the mid-west on corn-fed beef. Maybe I haven't tasted any good grass-fed stuff, but my experience generally is I don't like it much.
 

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Dry if you have time and money.
If you ever have properly prepared venison after it's hung in a cooler 10-15 days after being cleaned and skinned, you'll never touch "fresh" meat venison again!
From WIKI:
Dry-aged beef is beef that has been hung or placed on a rack to dry for several weeks. After the animal is slaughtered and cleaned, either the entire or half will be hung. Primal (large distinct sections) or sub primal cuts strip loins, rib eyes and sirloin are placed in a refrigerator unit. This process involves considerable expense, as the beef must be stored near freezing temperatures. Subprimal cuts can be dry aged on racks either in specially climate-controlled coolers or within a moisture-permeable drybag. The key effect of dry aging is the concentration and saturation of the natural flavour, as well as the tenderization of the meat texture. The process changes beef by two means. Firstly, moisture is evaporated from the muscle.. This creates a greater concentration of beef flavour and taste. Secondly, the beef’s natural enzymes break down the connective tissue in the muscle, which leads to more tender beef.

Wet-aged beef is beef that has typically been aged in a vacuum-sealed bag to retain its moisture. This is the dominant mode of aging beef in the U.S. today. Wet-aging is popular because it takes less time: typically only a few days. Moisture accumulates while in the vacuum bag and its amount depends on the timing of aging; thus, there is little weight loss.
 

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I think the grass fed beef is popular primarily with the folks who want to stay away from GMO's. If you mention corn, they automatically assume it's genectically modified, and they want no part of it. Even in their beef.

Wet, dry, grass, or corn. Don't know. But, Medium Rare please.
 

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Well grass fed beef if the beef is grazing on good land has a better texture and such. But with the droughts that been plaguing the midwest or cattle growing areas then the pasture land is not that good of shape and they tend to graze on what my dad use to call stubble and that aint good for the taste of beef.

The best beef I ever ate was what my dad did. We rented a farm house when I was a small lad and had about a 100 acres if I remember correctly and my dad ask the owner if he could use about 15 acres to raise some steers on for butchering. The owner agreed and my dad fence off 15 acres into 4 sections. he then seeded them 4 sections with red clover and let it grow, sorta of 30to 40 percent clover and grass coverage in each section.
Then he got about 3 calf steers at the local sale barn and after doing the milk thing(lord I hated them early morning milk feeding lol) after weaning them he let them graze a section at a time till they was good and ready for slaughter.
Well after the local butcher tried to rip my dad off he decided to slaughter his own beef. That where I learned about skinning:biggrin:. But to the point that beef was the best tasting and after slaughtering my dad had a neighborhood bbq and man people really loved the beef. We even had some Texas A&M people come up to see what my dad did. We lived there for several years and that is when I started into raising a small amount of pigs for FFA shows and meat and sale and chickens for eggs and meat and my dad raised about 100 rabbits for sale and meat to. We never had to buy our meat:biggrin:. I really miss them days as a young-un.
 

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To me I think the cattle should be raised on grass and then fattened with grain right before slaughter so you can get good marbling in the meat. I try not to let my family have any go products as well. Hard to do these days though. It's in everything!
 

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Grass fed and finished beef is healthier. It is higher in conjugated linoleic acid, vitamin E, and omega 3 fatty acids. It is the food cows evolved to eat. Feeding them starchy grains like corn upsets the PH and flora of their digestive systems, resulting in less of the above mentioned nutrients.
True, you get less marbling and overall fat content, but the omega 3 to omega 6 ratio is vastly superior. Methods to imcrease the overall fat content while maintaining the omega 3 content are being developed.

Eat Wild - Health Benefits
 
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Cattle can handle some grain. Others like sheep and goats it really does no good. In the cattle the grain that turns to fat in the meat (marbling). In goats and sheep the fat just turns into layers of fat that will be removed in order to eat. In regarding eating beef my family only tries to eat it only occasionally. We know the sheep and goats we raise are completely natural and the deer we eat are mostly naturally fed (since they eat some of the gmo corn and soybeans here in the Monsanto Midwest!)
 

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the ones we tried on corn and or sweet feed developed the scours and tasted like it, the ones we killed off grass or winter wheat tasted great
 
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There is/was a great restaurat in my old hometown that would dry age their beef. They made the best steaks I ever had in my life. I don't buy expensive steaks these days.



Mike T.
 

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We always fed them out on grass, then two weeks or so before slaughter we'd put them in a stall and feed them grain and hay to "clean 'em out". Sure was good eating.

I'm not a fan of the grass fed beef you buy in the store. It don't taste right to me.
 
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