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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have always used Remington brass due to local availability, but recently ordered some Starline brass due to the price...(Remington brass has went up in price...$47.95 per 50 locally)

I know many of you use Starline...would you please tell me about it?


Longevity, OAL from the package....anything you think is relevant.
 

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I use Starline brass in 45-70. They were a perfect length when I got them. After I think the third loading I trimed them. All has been well and some are on their fifth loadings with no signs of giving up! Just remember about the case capacity on these which I know your aware of already Ridgerunner ;)
 

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Last weekend I annealed the 100 I have, as Starline skips the final anneal after case forming. They say it’s to keep the case stronger for HP loading, I call BS, they do it to save cost.

Try them first, but I could never get them to seal in the chamber.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Rowdy said:
Last weekend I annealed the 100 I have, as Starline skips the final anneal after case forming. They say it’s to keep the case stronger for HP loading, I call BS, they do it to save cost.

Try them first, but I could never get them to seal in the chamber.
Thank You Rowdy...I don't much like the idea of having to anneal them, but I ain't paying nearly $1 each either. ;)

Do they also exhibit the PRE? And, at what appx. pressure are you using them?
 

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Ridgerunner665 said:
Thank You Rowdy...I don't much like the idea of having to anneal them, but I ain't paying nearly $1 each either. ;)

Do they also exhibit the PRE? And, at what appx. pressure are you using them?
Mine show PRE and that is normal even at 28,000PSI. I have shot some at ~40,000PSI, but most have been at ~30,000PSI
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
lever addict said:
PRE? Can you please explain?
Its not an exact science...and its filled with some opinion.

But, in definition...PRE is the expansion of the brass a little above the rim (appx. 1/4 on an inch above in the case of the 45-70 in a Marlin chamber)
 

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Is annealing a must for accuracy or just to prolong case life? I mean if there is blow by or soot on the neck of the case then I imagine annealing is a must. Is it possible to not ever have to anneal? I'm sure it's a pain in the butt and I would just go buy new brass, but if it's the difference between 3.5" groups at 100 yards and cloverleafs then I am interested! This is something I have to really read up on!
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Annealing is not that big of a deal...just an added step in the process ;)
 

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I use only Starline brass in my 45-70. Have never had a case failure or signs of stress. The cases have been reloaded at least 20 times. I anneal after every third firing or once a year which ever comes first. I anneal for two reasons, one is extended case life the other is an attempt to get exactly the same bullet release for every round which in theory means more accuracy. Does it do that? I know it extends case life but I have no proof that it makes for more accuracy other than 20 rounds in a 2 inch circle at 100 yards, off a bench with metal sights. Annealing may be just a wasted step in my reloading process, but to get back to your original question, in my opinion Starline is an excellent brass.
 

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I have been using Starline Brass exclusively for all of my .45-70 reloads. My current batch has been reloaded about ten times and trimmed twice. I have never annealed the cases -or even thought about it- until I read this thread. Accuracy has been excellent all the way.

I have had no signs of case failure. I load most of my cartridges to “Marlin level” in terms of pressure -but I do start about ten percent below listed start load and work my way up due to case capacity.

I did a Google search on this topic a while back, and I couldn't find many who where disappointed with the brass from Starline. I do like to bee on the safe side, so I've ordered a new batch of 200 cases and plan to retire the ones I have.
 

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lever addict said:
Is annealing a must for accuracy or just to prolong case life? I mean if there is blow by or soot on the neck of the case then I imagine annealing is a must. Is it possible to not ever have to anneal? I'm sure it's a pain in the butt and I would just go buy new brass, but if it's the difference between 3.5" groups at 100 yards and cloverleafs then I am interested! This is something I have to really read up on!
Here is what they say on Widener's about annealing the Starline brass. I don't think it is just a gimmic.

"SL4570 Starline 45/70 Unprimed Brass $20.00 per 50 45-70

Has been tested at elevated pressures suitable for Magnum Heavy Hunting Loads in adequate gun systems. When loading with black powder, annealing of mouth may be necessary to allow case to properly seal chamber due to lower pressures generated by these loads. Reason being case is produced very strong to withstand high pressure loads associated with smokeless hunting loads and since the only way to make brass harder is to work the material our only option is to leave them stiffer and the customers can anneal for specific application."
 

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rhendrix said:
Here is what they say on Widener's about annealing the Starline brass. I don't think it is just a gimmic.

"SL4570 Starline 45/70 Unprimed Brass $20.00 per 50 45-70

Has been tested at elevated pressures suitable for Magnum Heavy Hunting Loads in adequate gun systems. When loading with black powder, annealing of mouth may be necessary to allow case to properly seal chamber due to lower pressures generated by these loads. Reason being case is produced very strong to withstand high pressure loads associated with smokeless hunting loads and since the only way to make brass harder is to work the material our only option is to leave them stiffer and the customers can anneal for specific application."
This is interesting.. The worst by far in terms of sooty cases I have used has been factory loaded 405gr Remington. They came out black a good ways down the side of the case. I have both Starline and Remington brass and load in the lower velocity range, usually between 24 and 28gr of 5744 and both Rem and Starline brass stay perfectly clean. I have begun experimenting with Unique and just went through 20 using Starline and loads ranging from 12 to 14gr with 350gr and 405 bullets. The brass is clean afterward. I am wondering, since Unique is a fast burning pistol powder that the pressure spike is such that it expands even the non annealed case enough. Also 5744 is relatively fast as well compared with a lot of the rifle powders used in the 45/70 so again, I wonder if it is the pressure there as well.
 

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I have been using Starline brass in my 45-70 for 12 reloads, trimmed once, due to trim now. I don't have a problem with chamber sealing.
I had some Remington cases in 6.5x55 Swedish and they needed to be annealed quite often. It is a pretty simple proceedure really, those who know can skip this bit, but if you have not annealed just stand them up in a tray of water filled to halfway up the case. Heat the necks up with a blow torch (or similar heat source) until they are red and just tip them over in the water. It is as simple as that. This is the way I was shown how to anneal when I was just a nipper, by my grandfather. The annealing process will leave a slight stain on the cases, so if you have a case cleaner, now would be a good time to use it.
Don't forget to be sure the cases are dry (inside and out) if you plan to load soon afterwards. The whole process is just common sense.
Hope this helps.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
moofy07 said:
I have been using Starline brass in my 45-70 for 12 reloads, trimmed once, due to trim now. I don't have a problem with chamber sealing.
I had some Remington cases in 6.5x55 Swedish and they needed to be annealed quite often. It is a pretty simple proceedure really, those who know can skip this bit, but if you have not annealed just stand them up in a tray of water filled to halfway up the case. Heat the necks up with a blow torch (or similar heat source) until they are red and just tip them over in the water. It is as simple as that. This is the way I was shown how to anneal when I was just a nipper, by my grandfather. The annealing process will leave a slight stain on the cases, so if you have a case cleaner, now would be a good time to use it.
Don't forget to be sure the cases are dry (inside and out) if you plan to load soon afterwards. The whole process is just common sense.
Hope this helps.
Actually....its a bit more complicated than that.

If you're heating them until they are red you are over-annealing them (they are forever weakened)...here is a pretty good read on annealing.

http://www.6mmbr.com/annealing.html
 

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Thanks RR,
It was the way my Grandfather showed me. I will definately be having a good look at that link.
Always willing to learn more.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Its a lot like casting boolits...the temperature is very important.

Brass not hot enough by just a few degrees...and its doesn't do anything at all (you're just killing time)

Brass too hot...they are forever weakened, and even ruined (unsafe) if the temp is high enough.
 

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Ridgerunner665 said:
Its a lot like casting boolits...the temperature is very important.

Brass not hot enough by just a few degrees...and its doesn't do anything at all (you're just killing time)

Brass too hot...they are forever weakened, and even ruined (unsafe) if the temp is high enough.
Sounds complicated.. ??? ::)
 
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